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650l cylinder head wasted what to do

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I just found out the top end on my 07 650 l hasn't been getting oil ,do to the oil filter housing and a crack from the previous owner installing the filter backwards. When I got the bike it had 2000 miles on it and a small rattle in the top end with a fresh oil change ,I was assuming the valves needed adjusted and was to lazy to get to it. after another 1000 miles. One of my buddies who has the same bike with 18000 miles on it said I should get it because his bike didn't make any noises like that .so I adjusted the valves and checked the oil line up to the top end and no oil coming out of it .so I took it to a mechanic and found out its around 1,600 to fix any suggestions go oem,used,aftermarket our do a big bore kit thanks I want to get back on the road bad thanks

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That sucks man, sorry to hear that. As I have been finding out on my own project/headache all previous owners are borderline retarded, TT members excluded obviously. 

 

You need to figure out what you're willing to put into the bike first before you go about figuring out what to change out. Best case scenario is that you only fried your cam, cam bearings, and rockers which all told is probably north of $400 just in OE parts. It only gets more expensive once you open up the motor and find out the reality of the damage.

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You may be pleasantly surprised at how little damage has been done to it. The top end is always the first casualty of an oiling problem with these engines (I just had a cam meltdown about a month ago...). The bottom end seems to hold its own as most of the moving parts ride on roller bearings. So... before you throw in the towell, pull the valve cover off and see for yourself how bad things really are. Take pictures and ask for help. Even if the head is damaged, there are shops that will repair them. A late model XR600R head will also fit on an XRL, so eBay is also an option. Here's a possible scenario:

eBay stock cam: $50

Rockers: A place on eBay sells them for $100 a set. I can't vouch for the quality of them. I just bought one new rocker at the local Honda shop for $40 so $160 would get you a set of OE rockers.

Head gasket (assuming you will want to pull the head to check the condition of the piston and cylinder): $30 for a good quality Cometic... don't use their base gasket though... they leak!

The bike is low mileage so as long as the bore is not scuffed up, you can just hit it with a hone and throw on some new rings. Rings run about $20.

If the head is damaged, that will of course add cost, but as you can see, you may well escape for less than $300.

 

If you want to go big while you have it apart... you can do big bore with a compression ratio bump. A new piston will run about $200. The local machine shop here will bore a cylinder for about $50. You will probably want to get your cam reground also.Megacycle is in California... not sure where you are, but you might be able to deal directly with them. They can use your stock cam and rockers as cores so you will not have to buy new. You'll be into them for somewhere between $550 and $600 for a reground perfomance cam and hard welded rockers.

If you want to do the full monte, you can pull the engine completely apart and stuff in an XR600R countershat (so you can ut a kicker on it) with an FMX 5th gear and NX 2nd gear.

 

There is a guy that lives in San Francisco who works almost exclusively on RFVC motors. If you dont want to do the work yourself and want it to be done by someone who won't screw you, but will do it right, let me know and I can see about connecting you to him.

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Thanks were going to figure it out today, it's still better than owning a Ktm

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HINT: Pulling the valve cover can be a VERY frustrating process if you don't pull the carb and intake manifold. Make sure that you get a very good grip on the bottom intake manifod bolt. Use an allen wrench with a good square tip. That bolt is challenging to get to and if you dont get a good connection on it and slip, you are screwed... strip out the head on that bolt and you'll have to pull the engine to get it out.

 

Tank, seat, side panels off. Pull the carb and intake. Spark plug out. Loosen all of the bolts on the valve cover (there is usually a big puddle of oil in the left corner of the head... have a rag handy to catch it when the valve cover pops loose). Most of the bolts will come out, but there is a large bolt in the center that you wont be able to get out yet. Completely loosen it, but leave it in place for now. Once you get all of the other bolts out, turn the engine run switch off and bump the starter button. The valve train turning over should pop the valve cover loose. Now mop up the big mess of oil that ran down the front of your engine. Pull the valve cover to the left of the engine and pull out that one bolt. Now slide the valve cover backwards where the carb was. It will rotate back, down and out.

Edited by ThumpNRed

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Turns out the rockers took the brunt of it . Should be going by the weekend thanks for all the help

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beda, on 20 May 2014 - 8:48 PM, said:

Turns out the rockers took the brunt of it . Should be going by the weekend thanks for all the help

Check for oil to the head BEFORE  you actually start it. Leave the plug out with the kill switch grounded, crank till you get oil out of the top of the oil line.

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Yup... That's the common point of failure. The cam's OK?

Turns out the rockers took the brunt of it . Should be going by the weekend thanks for all the help

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You mentioned a crack around the oil filter. Was it just the cover or the actual clutch cover where the oil filter recess is?

I remember seeing one that had the oil filter installed backwards and it had cracked the clutch cover on the inside.

I've got 70,000 combined miles on my XR650L and XL600R and have never had oiling related problems. What I have seen has mostly been caused by poor mechanical skills. Twisted oil lines, the banjo bolts in the wrong order, backwards oil filters, the oil filter cover misaligned, the right cam bearing which has a seal on one side turned the wrong way and lastly simply letting the engine run low on oil. Too tight of valve clearances will cause damage too and some aftermarket cams require a different clearance than OEM cams.

After a rebuild you should check for oil flow, but doing it every oil change is excessive and unneeded.

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You mentioned a crack around the oil filter. Was it just the cover or the actual clutch cover where the oil filter recess is?

I remember seeing one that had the oil filter installed backwards and it had cracked the clutch cover on the inside.

I've got 70,000 combined miles on my XR650L and XL600R and have never had oiling related problems. What I have seen has mostly been caused by poor mechanical skills. Twisted oil lines, the banjo bolts in the wrong order, backwards oil filters, the oil filter cover misaligned, the right cam bearing which has a seal on one side turned the wrong way and lastly simply letting the engine run low on oil. Too tight of valve clearances will cause damage too and some aftermarket cams require a different clearance than OEM cams.

After a rebuild you should check for oil flow, but doing it every oil change is excessive and unneeded.

Also check the screen on the oil line that connects the frame oil tank to the engine. I cooked a cam a month or so ago following a winter rebuild. When I tore into it, I found that the screen was completely fouled with what looked like dryer lint! I used the blue paper shop towels on the rebuild and aparently they are known to be very "linty". I had never used them before, but decided to give them a try instead of messing up the washer with oily shop towels.

I had about 150 miles on the fresh build... riding to work one morning, sitting in traffic and the engine temp went through the roof. I have a temp sensor and gauge on the bike... thank heavens! The damage was contained to one rocker and the corresponding cam lobe. I threw the stock cam back in it with a new rocker.... good as new. It actually pulls harder with the stock cam than it did with the Hotcam... who'da thought!

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Also check the screen on the oil line that connects the frame oil tank to the engine.

 

That's when to pay attention to the oil supply line during instalation becasue that's when people get it twisted and it closes off enough to starve the pump for oil. They just have to make sure they aren't simply tightening the line without watching for the hose to twist.

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The cam is fine ,the clutch cover was cracked where the oil filter goes into and the parts should be here tomorrow afternoon and will be ridding on saturday morning . One more question how do you tell if your banjo bolts are lined up properly ? Also Thumpnred id like to get the name of the guy in S F I live a couple of hours north of there thanks for all your help

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The rockers got burned up from oil starvation and the cam is fine?

 

NO.

 

No alignment is needed with the banjo bolts; there is a 360° groove inside the fitting.

 

The guy in SF that ThumpNRed is talking about is mcma111 on ADV Rider.

 

It actually pulls harder with the stock cam than it did with the Hotcam... who'da thought!

 

Shoulda tried twisting it harder before going back to stock. :p

Edited by HeadTrauma

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Shoulda tried twisting it harder before going back to stock. :p

When we had both cams out messing with them, we decided to measure them both. The OE cam has quite a bit more lift than the Hotcam, but a lot less duration. I think the increased duration of the Hotcam is reducing the compression ratio enough on the bottom to decrease the low end. The OE cam seems to be just about ideal for a low end grunt cam. I just got back from a trail ride and am impressed... It pulls really well. Now if I had a rear tire that wold actually hook up...

 

Back on topic though... HeadTauma is right about the guy in SF. I didn;t want to get smacked for posting about other forums... not sure if that's against the law in here or not :shocked:

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