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Master Cylinder Mounting Angle

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Anyone know why it is necessary that the master cylinder is angled so much towards the rider?  The manual says to fill the reservoir up to the casting edge on the front, which is barely doable without fluid spilling out the back (nearest the rider).  Then when putting the rubber diaphragm back in, fluid spills out.  The lever/reservoir are aligned with the bars properly (with the notch), but it seems a little extreme.  So much so that I can't tell if I'm looking at an empty reservoir throught the site glass or clean fluid.  It is clean fluid, but my point is I wouldn't know the difference if it was empty.  Sure my brake probably wouldn't work, but you get my point.  Any harm in rotating it forward a bit?  Why does it need to be in this position?

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It really doesn't matter if it's straight up. You should fill it while it's straight. An example of how far they can get off is my Hayabusa. When I took off the clip ons and put regular bars on the clutch and front brake master is angled differently. They work fine no need to change them for the angle. Also when you turn go down hills and so forth they still work. You should concentrate on the best riding position for your hands to be at on both the clutch and brake.

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You should concentrate on the best riding position for your hands to be at on both the clutch and brake.

 

That is my intention, but I'm wondering why Honda would put a notch on the handlebars and say to align the master cylinder with this notch if it doesn't make a difference.

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I think it is just for reference when setting up a new bike. You quicklyicon1.png look at the marks and shazam she's set up.

 

That's what I'm thinking too.  But why wouldn't there be a notch for the clutch lever as well?  I'm not going to stress over it.  I'll just move it where I want it.

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The lever/reservoir are aligned with the bars properly (with the notch), but it seems a little extreme.

 

The angle of the brake and clutch assemblies is dictated by rider reference and not by any mark on the handlebars. Where did you get the idea that alignment to a notch is used? (Note comments below Edit.)

 

A very good way to set the angle, and one that I have used for years on every moto I've owned since learning it, is the neutral wrist position method. Loosen both the clutch and brake assemblies just enough so they can be rotated by hand but not so much that they droop from their own weight. Sit on the seat in a normal riding position, preferably with your feet on the pegs (you must support the bike so it's vertical - a small piece of wood under the extended sidestand works). Extend your arms so your hands are just above the controls and close your eyes. Drop your hands towards the controls until they touch. Your fingers should just touch the tops of the levers.  If they don't, open your eyes and rotate one assembly with the opposite hand until the assembly just touches your fingers. Go back to the beginning and now adjust the other side. Do a final check - eyes closed and drop hands on controls. If all is aligned, tighten the assembly bolts. Go ride. Pay attention to how natural it feels when you use both controls.

 

Now, go back to square 1 - loosen the bolts and get ready to readjust. This time, stand on the pegs in as natural a riding position as possible, and adjust both control assemblies. Go ride, standing as much as possible. Pay attention to how natural it feels when you use both controls.

 

You now have to choose where you want to set the controls based on your riding style. If you sit most of the time, use the first position you found. If you stand most of the time, use the second position you found. OR, use a position somewhere in between. The goal is to make using the controls with your wrists in as neutral position as you can - no downward or upward bending of the wrists.

 

All the business with the closed eyes is to get your visual system out of the loop and adjust according to your wrists. Eventually you'll not need to close your eyes, but go directly to the position that feels best immediately.

 

And BTW, you'll find that the brake reservoir will end up nearly level.  If it's off a bit, turn the handlebars to one side or the other. If the bike is vertical, the rotation to the left and right will change the angle of the brake reservoir with respect to the ground and it will be nearly level somewhere in the turning process.

 

:ride:

 

 

Edit: I changed the method name from neutral position to neutral wrist position; an oversight on my part.

 

I did find comments in the Honda CRF230F Service Manual about using alignment marks when installing the handlebars and controls. But one must always use common sense when reading instructions. There is no way that one specific alignment of controls will fit all riders. If you buy non-stock handlebars (a common rider-preference occurrence), there will be no alignment marks. You will have to resort to another alignment method. Fitting the rider is part of setting the bike up for the rider. This is mentioned, and stressed, in the CRF250R and CRF250X Honda Owner's Manuals. I suspect the alignment information in the CRF230F Service Manual is taking into consideration the beginner/novice that will often be the bike owner and is meant to help these new riders rather than overwhelm them with decisions that they can only make after getting some riding and wrenching experience. I meant no disrespect by my comment, only puzzlement about where this could be written.

Edited by ramz

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Bleed and flush fluid with the top level.

When finished, as long as it's full, adjust lever for comfort and your done.

IMO:

You can rotate master cylinder up to 30-40 degrees forward of backwards, no worries, it will work fine.

Edited by adnohguy

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I meant no disrespect by my comment, only puzzlement about where this could be written.

 

No worries.  It's just in my nature to want to fully understand the reasoning behind things.  I contacted Honda and the person I spoke too couldn't determine the reason either.  I'm sure it's just a reference mark for initial setup of the bike.  That doesn't explain why there isn't a notch for the clutch lever, but whatever.  I'm not going to worry about it.  If the angle of the MC was really that critical, they would say not to ride up or down steep hills, which of course would be ridiculous.  Thanks for the input guys.

Edited by mossman77

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