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Doing my break-in service.

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Greetings all

 

I'm in the process of doing the scheduled service after the first 700 miles. I've re-greased the suspension linkage and will be doing the valve check next.

 

I've seen other mention re-packing the wheel bearings but I dont see how this can be done without ruining the dust shields.

Can someone elighten me on this.?

 

Also how be a deal is it going to be getting at the steering bearings ?

 

D.

 

 

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The wheel bearings are sealed bearings, I havnt seen anyone here post that theyve packed them.

 

The steering stem isnt to bad to do, just have to take lotsa parts off.  Take front wheel off, remove front fender, take forks off, unbolt handlebars from top triple, remove headlight, remove headlight/gauge cluster bracket from top triple, remove top triple.  Then all you have left is the stem and lower triple clamp still in the neck, you should be able to figure it out from there!

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The wheel bearings are sealed bearings, I havnt seen anyone here post that theyve packed them.

 

 

I suspected this.

 

What inprovised tool can be used for the steering stem nut ?

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i believe TRO or someone said it was only hand tight, but i am gathering the same way you would do your shock preload... with a screw driver and something to tap it with.. but wait till someone else chimes in and confirms what i am saying... i only think i am right.. and that could be dangerous!!! hahahaha 

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I used a screwdriver and a hammer, like EYE said (maybe its an electrician thing? haha).  Its probably more than hand tight, but its not real tight.  When you put it back together it dosnt need to be super tight or anything.  All your doing is setting your bearing load.  You just want to have a slight amount of drag on the bearings.  I think the service manual actually said something like 4ft-lbs.  Which seems a bit to low to me.  When I put mine together I got it a bit tighter than that.  I just set mine till I liked the feel of the bearings but I also set it just slightly tight, but once I got everything back together it actually felt like it moves more freely than stock.  So I dont know if I really set the bearings as tight as I thought, or the new grease just made that much of a difference.  Then again the manual didnt state if they meant 4ft-lbs of drag on the steering, or the nut is supposed to be tightened to 4ft-lbs.  4ft-lbs of drag would make more sense.

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I used a screwdriver and a hammer, like EYE said (maybe its an electrician thing? haha).  Its probably more than hand tight, but its not real tight.  When you put it back together it dosnt need to be super tight or anything.  All your doing is setting your bearing load.  You just want to have a slight amount of drag on the bearings.  I think the service manual actually said something like 4ft-lbs.  Which seems a bit to low to me.  When I put mine together I got it a bit tighter than that.  I just set mine till I liked the feel of the bearings but I also set it just slightly tight, but once I got everything back together it actually felt like it moves more freely than stock.  So I dont know if I really set the bearings as tight as I thought, or the new grease just made that much of a difference.  Then again the manual didnt state if they meant 4ft-lbs of drag on the steering, or the nut is supposed to be tightened to 4ft-lbs.  4ft-lbs of drag would make more sense.

After looking at the manual closer the preload is 2.38 - 4.77 lbs of drag measured with a pull scale. I should be able to get that close enough. I was assuming if the stem nut was torqued to the 22 ftlb spec the window of drag would fall into place. I dont have the special socket wrench to actually use a torque wrench so I'll do the hammer and screwdriver thing then check the preload with the pull sacle.

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i do not have a spring scale... :thinking:  i guess it would be a good little tool to add to my collection... :prof:  or lack there of...   :doh:

 

 

Look in your tackle box Dude ....   :smirk:

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sad to say, i don't have much fishing gear anymore...  but good call...  my dad seemed to take mine and my brothers stuff because none of us really do it that much anymore... he will stop anywhere, anytime and sit there for a few to fish...  he never catches anything, but as long as he's happy...

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Here's how I set the steering head bearings.

After you grease them up and have re-assembled the triples, Crank that step nut down real tight and swivel the triples back & forth five or six times, that squeezes all the grease aside and insures a good bearing to race contact. Then loosen the nut till there's a bit of back and forth wobble. Then tighten the nut down hand tight till there's no more wobble, and continue tightening till it's too tight (The triples feel like their dragging) then back off til you find the sweet spot where there's no play but everything moves freely. Do it a couple of times- tight then loose till you get the hang of it.

The main thing is the first step, cranking down hard to disperse the grease- if you skip that step, your bearings will get loose in no time, then you'll have to go thru the entire process all over again.

 

Greasing sealed bearings..

After you've removed the outer dust seal, clean the surface of the bearing and hub, don't want to introduce any crud into the new grease.

To remove that little seal, use a real small pick or tiny knife blade and stick it between the inside lip of the seal and the metal and gently pry up. It'll pop right out. I like to over load the bearing up with a lot of grease then use the back end of a socket approx. the same size as the bearing to cram the grease in, then repeat. Make sure the little seal you popped out is flat and push it back in till it fully seats all the way around (It's original position). Clean the dust seal & apply a small bit of grease to the inner groove and push it home with your thumbs till it seats, put the spacers back in and clean everything up real good with contact cleaner or your favorite solvent- Done.

I've used this method for years and never had a problem tearing anything up.

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Here's how I set the steering head bearings.

After you grease them up and have re-assembled the triples, Crank that step nut down real tight and swivel the triples back & forth five or six times, that squeezes all the grease aside and insures a good bearing to race contact. Then loosen the nut till there's a bit of back and forth wobble. Then tighten the nut down hand tight till there's no more wobble, and continue tightening till it's too tight (The triples feel like their dragging) then back off til you find the sweet spot where there's no play but everything moves freely. Do it a couple of times- tight then loose till you get the hang of it.

The main thing is the first step, cranking down hard to disperse the grease- if you skip that step, your bearings will get loose in no time, then you'll have to go thru the entire process all over again.

 

Greasing sealed bearings..

After you've removed the outer dust seal, clean the surface of the bearing and hub, don't want to introduce any crud into the new grease.

To remove that little seal, use a real small pick or tiny knife blade and stick it between the inside lip of the seal and the metal and gently pry up. It'll pop right out. I like to over load the bearing up with a lot of grease then use the back end of a socket approx. the same size as the bearing to cram the grease in, then repeat. Make sure the little seal you popped out is flat and push it back in till it fully seats all the way around (It's original position). Clean the dust seal & apply a small bit of grease to the inner groove and push it home with your thumbs till it seats, put the spacers back in and clean everything up real good with contact cleaner or your favorite solvent- Done.

I've used this method for years and never had a problem tearing anything up.

Thanks humbug for the info here. 

For the most part I did as you described.I packed the steering bearings then put it together. I cranked down on the adj. nut then swung the forks back and forth. Lossened up the nut then did it again. I then set up my pull gauge and cranked down the the adjustment nut until there was about 5 lbs of drag when the steering started to move.

 

I have not tried to pick out the wheel bearing dust seals yet but I think since the bearings are sealed I'll run them for a while before I get in to it.

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Here's how I set the steering head bearings.

After you grease them up and have re-assembled the triples, Crank that step nut down real tight and swivel the triples back & forth five or six times, that squeezes all the grease aside and insures a good bearing to race contact. Then loosen the nut till there's a bit of back and forth wobble. Then tighten the nut down hand tight till there's no more wobble, and continue tightening till it's too tight (The triples feel like their dragging) then back off til you find the sweet spot where there's no play but everything moves freely. Do it a couple of times- tight then loose till you get the hang of it.

The main thing is the first step, cranking down hard to disperse the grease- if you skip that step, your bearings will get loose in no time, then you'll have to go thru the entire process all over again.

 

Greasing sealed bearings..

After you've removed the outer dust seal, clean the surface of the bearing and hub, don't want to introduce any crud into the new grease.

To remove that little seal, use a real small pick or tiny knife blade and stick it between the inside lip of the seal and the metal and gently pry up. It'll pop right out. I like to over load the bearing up with a lot of grease then use the back end of a socket approx. the same size as the bearing to cram the grease in, then repeat. Make sure the little seal you popped out is flat and push it back in till it fully seats all the way around (It's original position). Clean the dust seal & apply a small bit of grease to the inner groove and push it home with your thumbs till it seats, put the spacers back in and clean everything up real good with contact cleaner or your favorite solvent- Done.

I've used this method for years and never had a problem tearing anything up.

 

 

do they have the bearing flush piece for our bearings??  once again, in the RC world, i would buy the sealed bearings... after running in mud or water or sand i would pull the rubber seal off and flush out with wd-40 or pb blaster stuff...  but we had a little plastic ring that would go over the bearing so you wouldn't blow penetrating oil back in your face... but would also help with the flushing...  it looks like this..

 

RPM81170-2T.jpg

 

http://www.rchobbyexplosion.com/RPM_Bearing_Blaster_p/rpm81170.htm?gclid=CM-EtujjzL4CFaQF7AodmEgAiw

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do they have the bearing flush piece for our bearings??  once again, in the RC world, i would buy the sealed bearings... after running in mud or water or sand i would pull the rubber seal off and flush out with wd-40 or pb blaster stuff...  but we had a little plastic ring that would go over the bearing so you wouldn't blow penetrating oil back in your face... but would also help with the flushing...  it looks like this..

 

RPM81170-2T.jpg

 

http://www.rchobbyexplosion.com/RPM_Bearing_Blaster_p/rpm81170.htm?gclid=CM-EtujjzL4CFaQF7AodmEgAiw

I honestly don't know.

But if you did want to use one, you'd have to remove the bearing from the hub...

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I honestly don't know.

But if you did want to use one, you'd have to remove the bearing from the hub...

 

then that's a whole different can of worms then.... lol   just curious...

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