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Can I use this oil?

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I bought a 1991 XR250L off a guy and he gave me a bottle of Motomaster Formula 1 Premium 2-Stroke motorcycle oil.

 

I'm assuming I can't use this because my is a 4-stroke?

 

I'm a total noob when it comes to motorcycles. This is my first one/first time owning a bike.

 

 

 

Can anyone recommend me a place to find a repair manual for this bike? I found a Haynes on Amazon.ca for $30 shipped to my door. Are the Haynes manuals good? I can't seem to find the official Honda one anywhere but if the Haynes one will do I will go with that.

 

 

Also, the front tire that came on the bike isn't ideal. The read has a Kenda K270 Dual Purpose tire on it and I was considering getting another K270 for the front tire as well. I plan to do both on-off road. Nothing extreme. It will be a commuter bike while hitting some minor trails as I am new rider sorta deal. 

 

Also, is Canada's Motorcycle a good place to buy things from? They've got that Kenda tire for $50 plus they've got all the other stuff I was lookg at buying. Tire spoons/jackets/boots/etc.

 

Obviously I will look for used stuff first to save money but their site seems pretty good.

 

 

THANKS!!

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ok thanks

 

I was just wondering if I COULD use it if I needed to, not that I WILL use it. I thought my bike had no oil in it but then I remembered you have to check it when it's standing upright, not on the kickstand :)

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No on the 2-smoke oil.  Use a 20w50 motorcycle oil in good weather on an air cooled motor.  Change it within 1,000 miles in perfect conditions.  I'm using Valvoline 20w50 full synthetic motorcycle oil @$ 8.47qt.  In your winter I would use Rotella T6 5w40.  It's rated for wet clutches.  If I was racing, I would use Motul 300v.  Change the filter every 3,000.

 

Yes on the 5.10-18 K270 DS tire.  Front, I have not tried the K270.  I have a Kenda 80/100-21 Parker Desert DOT.  Both tires are great off road because of their side knobs.  I have over 1500 mi. on both tires.  They're good for another 500.  The Parker has a small land to sea ratio on the knobs so i'm considering a different front tire for the slabs. 

 

 

.

Edited by Baja Rambler

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Any oil is better than no oil.

Clean oil is better than dirty oil.

2-stroke oil is designed to be mixed with gasoline and burned.

It is not for 4-stroke engines.

10-40 when it is cold.

20-50 in hot weather.

Besides motorcycle specific oils, these oils commonly get used.

15-50 Mobil 1

15-40 Rotella

5-40 Rotella T synthetic

Do NOT use any oil that is EC rated. "energy conservation" typically, they are 5-30, 10-30, 0-30

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Hey thanks for the reply Rambler.

 

I noticed on my front tire it says the size is 80/100-21, but below that it says (3.00/3.25-21) like that in brackets. When I was looking at the tire on the Canadian Motorcycles website, you can get it in 3.00-21 OR 3.25-21 size, differing in a few dollars. http://www.canadasmotorcycle.ca/kenda-k270-dual-purpose-front-tire.html

 

I don't know which size to get since the tire on there right now seems to indicate it is in between 3.00 and 3.25? Am I reading that correctly? 

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Post up the current tire sizes, front and rear.

If you are dual sporting a 250, 5.10 might be too big.

Will Canadian Tire mount the tire? Can you change a tire?

Sometimes local shops charge more for the tire, but mount it for less.

Price, Shipping, and mounting. Final price.

The Honda manual is the best by far. I have a Chilton or other manual. I'll check.

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The 5.10 is 6ply.  You may want to remove the street chain guard.  

 

It's nice to have tire changing skills.  Carry an xtra tube, irons, slime, and MTB pump.

 

I ride in sand and on rocks so I need  W  I  D  E.  

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Tire sizes are a mess, but there's a method to it. But then the actual tire sizes vary when inflated anyway :banghead:

I'd go 3.25x21 on the front for pavement and gravel/dirt roads. If you need more bite off road then get the 3.00x21.

 

+1 to what the others said about motor oil. I'm not sure what your choices are in BC, but diesel truck oil, "C" (commercial) rated is a safe bet. Rotella is good and have a lot of different viscosities. If I had just got a '91 and lived in BC I'd get 4L of Rotella T 15-40 and 2 new filters. That oil will do a decent job of cleaning, so change it again in a month and then use some 15-50 or 20-50 when it warms up.

 

cheers

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And for the manual, Google around. You should be able to find downloads of the owners manual and the service manual. The Honda manuals are best, but anything is better than nothing.

 

Enjoy the ride

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On tires:  The X.XX tire sizes are the old full profile tire sizes, nice full casings for bump abortion but they don't have the directional stability of the metric sizes like 80 or 90/100x21.

 

I've tried the old sizes on the front; the full profile tires that I use to like don't work a well as the newer metric sizes.

However on the back I run radial ply Trials tires (4.00R18) and really like the better bump absorption compared to knobbies (and the better traction).

 

I also use Rotella T6 in my XRs and CRF, although I prefer the clutch action with the T oil.

 

Enjoy your ride.

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The 80/100-21 is metric sizing(millimeters), 80mm width and height equals 100% of tire width. The 3.0-3.25 is width in inches. If you do the conversion, 3 inches is 76mm and 3.25 inches is 82.5mm. So the 3.25" tire would be closest in width to an 80mm tire.

 

I don't know which size to get since the tire on there right now seems to indicate it is in between 3.00 and 3.25? Am I reading that correctly?

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Canada's Motorcycle is great for BC dudes since you only pay 5% tax and free shipping.  I bought a Kenda K270 there and boots, pants,  etc...

Canadian Tire 20w50 moto oil or Mobil 1 15w50 is good for a BC XR250L.   

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This is the best tire size guide I have read.

It really explains the difference between a 4.00 and 4.10 tire. Hint, it isn't just 0.10 in width.

Metric sizes and just about all of them. It doesn't tell you that some tire companies are not 100% equal in sizing.

https://www.denniskirk.com/help_center/tire-sizes.jsp

In this forum, you get advice on XRs, and Xls from 250 to 440cc. Tires that will fit the swing arm.

In the dual sport forum, you get advice on tires that go from 10-90 to 90-10 stree to dirt use.

In your area, you find out what works for your dirt.

In my area, the dirt is lots of adobe (think brick hard) and rocks. Medium terrain tires suck here, but might work well elsewhere. Hard terrain tires work well. Trials tires work well out here. They have small knobs. Why do they work well? The rubber and the flexible sidewall. Basketball shoes grip well and are smooth. Football cleats have long hard spikes. Now imagine using the wrong shoe for each sport. That is soft vs hard terrain tires as best as I can explain it.

The Kenda site has a good page for which of their tires work well in specific areas.

Knobbies and dual sport tires with large knobs work better in the dirt, but they wear faster on the street. High speeds on pavement really kills knobbies. Knobbies in the rain are nasty.

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How to change motorcycle tires.

Google it. Read and watch videos.

Learn little tips like leaving the new tire on a hot driveway to make it more flexible.

Use baby powder

Buy 3 large Motion Pro tire irons. They are easier to use. Cheaper than destroying tubes with cheap irons.

When you get good, you can use 2 smaller irons. Or you can buy this set of three for only $25

http://www.motionpro.com/motorcycle/partno/08-0049/

Find someone local that can show you. They drink beer and watch. Help when needed. Offer a six pack for a lesson.

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However on the back I run radial ply Trials tires (4.00R18) and really like the better bump absorption compared to knobbies (and the better traction).

 

 

Hi Chuck, I've seen this comment about trials tires quite a few times and wonder, better traction on what? Rock and scrabble and shale probably, but what about loose stuff. And what about grass tracks? Dirt and gravel roads? Just curious in the quest for the illusive perfect rear tire.

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Hi Kev, more good info, thanks. Please tell me how the trials tires are wearing for you? Do you do any high-speed dirt/gravel road?

 

cheers

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Pluses:

Trials tires put more rubber in contact with the ground than a knobby, just look at the differences in void spaces between the two tires.

Trials tires also have many more biting edges for more traction. 

The larger casing provides better sharp edge bump absorption, and less bike deflection than a knobby.

A radial ply tire applies more even pressure on the footprint than a bias ply tire for better traction, also a longer footprint for more rubber on the ground.

 

Minuses:

Lack of void space requires lower pressure for mud cleaning, but you get even more traction with low psi because of the bigger footprint.

Radial ply tires have a higher threshold of traction before breakaway but a more sudden transition to sliding. Adds to the traction but makes sliding more sudden and sometimes difficult to control.

Low psi makes any tire squirrel at speed.

 

All of the comments about radial ply tires is also exist in automobile and truck radial tires compared to bias ply tires. 

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Thanks, well done. Sorry for hijacking the thread.

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Hi Chuck, I've seen this comment about trials tires quite a few times and wonder, better traction on what? Rock and scrabble and shale probably, but what about loose stuff. And what about grass tracks? Dirt and gravel roads? Just curious in the quest for the illusive perfect rear tire.

I run an MT43 on the rear of my XR400 and it's fantastic on gravel roads.   Can't speak to grass tracks as I don't encounter any.  They handle just about everything well except mud.

 

Perfect rear tire?  No such thing exists.  Everything is a compromise.

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