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13/44 for dirt wheels and 15/42 for the street with the same 112 chain?

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I just got a set of 17" Warp9 wheelsicon1.png and am considering changing the ratios on the dirt wheels to something like 13/44 for dirt and 15/42 for street.

 

Can I run the 112 link chain with these two sets?

 

Gearing Commander suggests that both are only slightly longer (8mm or so) than the factory 15/44 and I'm at 3.5 on the adjuster now.

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I have 13 teeth on my front sprocket on my 450 EXC KTM and if you want to go really slow on trails it's still too many!

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I have 13 teeth on my front sprocket on my 450 EXC KTM and if you want to go really slow on trails it's still too many!

How slow do you really want to go tho?  i had 14/44 on me bike (stock is 15/44) and thought that was too low. 

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These bikes don't want to putt putt around. :-). Picking through a Rocky terrain I so sometimes wish I did not have to lug the engine or ride the clutch. But it is my lack of experience also!!

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There are muddy, hilly, rocky, narrow trails that I simply cannot go faster than a slow walk.. on/off the clutch while losing my balance meant that I'd accidentally spin up the rear and bury it and gently, slowly fall over in the mud lol.. as low as possible is good for pure dirt for me, then I'll leave on the 15/44 for trails, and my warp9 has a 42, so a 15/42 is the same as 15/44 stock on stock dirt wheels.

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So the 15/42 combo with the factory chain is *just* about too long. I have the adjusters all the way back. I'm afraid that the 13/44 & 15/42 combo will need a shorter chain.

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I run 13/44 with 21/18" wheels and stock 15/41 with SM wheels. Same chain, no problem, though I forget the link count.

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Bear in mind that you want to locktite the front sprocket. This takes a good 12hours to cure.

I run 2 chains but keep the same front sprocket 14/48 for dirt and 14/39 for sm. But I'll change the front sprocket at 2000 miles and splitlink every 1000 miles.

Edited by Broadie

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I called canada's motorcycle and changed to a 14 front sprocket and ordered a 43 tooth rear KTM for my warp9 17" street wheel. The 14/44 and 15/43 require roughly the same length chain, and if I don't want to switch I can get away with using them in any combo.

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If you go too small on the front sprocket it will eat the swingarm slider quickly.

 

If you are swapping frequently the locktite is not as critical because you will be checking often, but don't strip the threads on the output shaft because it isn't easy to change.

 

For street use it is recommended that the chain not have a master link.  Many do use them though.  For these types of chains though the masterlinks fit so tight you will find it difficult to undo and redo them.  You could have 2 masterlinks, but again, they are hard to assemble and disassemble and you could end up with uneven wear on the removable piece compared to the rest of the chain.

 

If you take the swingarm pivot bolt out you can remove the chain intact and swap between 2 chains, but that is yet another step when swapping wheels.

 

The chain is 500 series which is 5/8" pitch.  That is to say that the pins are 5/8" (about 15mm) apart.  Unless you can find a "1/2 link" for your brand of chain you can only make chain length changes in 1 1/4" (30mm) increments.  That translates into the axle moving 5/8" (15mm) per link removed or added.

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I should add the locktite fix is to keep the sprocket from rotating slightly on the output shaft when snapping the throttle open or closing abruptly which puts a lot of torque in lower gears.  The nut isn't coming loose but the wear loosens its clamping force, which then lets the sprocket rock more.  The rocking wears away at the sprocket or lock washer until there is play.  That rocking and wear can happen an hour after you assemble even at proper torque.  Be aware of that and keep an eye out for the wearing.  it does seem to depend a bit on the brand of sprocket and how well it fits the splines.    I have never had a problem with mine but at about 10,000km I put locktite.  I have not used locktite every time but there is still a residue which may help even when I don't.  The larger the sprocket the greater the torque  will be.

 

Your mileage may vary.

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MORE great info. :)

 

Does it wear the sprocket only? I could conceive that it could wear the shaft as well, making it harder to get a tight fit even with a new sprocket.

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unless you ride very hard it wont be a problem .. mine is 14 years old and never had loctite on it .. loctite 'does wonders' for seals to, i wouldnt get too judicious with it .. i tend to look at the pics of bikes people do things like this to .. theyre generally beat up, filthy, look like they work on them with a 3' pipe wrench and a hammer, ect .. im not saying its not a good thing .. just trying to point out imo theres nothing to worry about there if you use a quality sprocket thats designed correctly ..

Edited by cowpie

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MORE great info. :)

 

Does it wear the sprocket only? I could conceive that it could wear the shaft as well, making it harder to get a tight fit even with a new sprocket.

 

Both the C/S and sprocket splines will wear.

 

unless you ride very hard it wont be a problem .. mine is 14 years old and never had loctite on it .. loctite 'does wonders' for seals to, i wouldnt get too judicious with it .. i tend to look at the pics of bikes people do things like this to .. theyre generally beat up, filthy, look like they work on them with a 3' pipe wrench and a hammer, ect .. im not saying its not a good thing .. just trying to point out imo theres nothing to worry about there if you use a quality sprocket thats designed correctly ..

 

Granted, some of these "issues" never affect certain owners... when I bought my bike ('00 S with 15k miles) I did all the loctite-fixes.  Everything was tight (go figure :lol: ) except the clutch hub nut and C/S nut, which was loose when I bought the bike.  The PO never did any of the loctite-fixes and the C/S splines definitely have some wear on them…

 

Properly applied, loctite is added insurance against wear and loosening of hardware that can be catastrophic to your engine.  There is no reason why loctite and pipe-wrenches have to be in the same sentence.

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Well, my sprockets came in the mail today, and I've just finished putting the loctite fixes in place everywhere else. (Still deciding on how to reassemble the damn lower idler gear.)

 

I'm going to throw the 14 tooth on tonight. What about using blue loctite? Surely, that will also help lock it in place, but won't require as much force to remove? Or is that simple not strong enough to actually take up the microslack in the fittings?

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