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msd super conductor ignition wire? anyone tried it with results?

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Hi

i have a crf 250 2012.

I wonder if anyone on any bike because they are kinda the same.. have ever tried using a perfomance ignition wire with any result?

And is it possible to connect a fibre core on the coil or does it have to be copper?

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Vehicles with solid state electronic ignitions and/or other systems on board need RF suppression in the ignition secondary to prevent electromagnetic interference with the system operation.  Normally, all that is needed is one point of resistance in the HT circuit somewhere, and the place normally used is the spark plug itself.  The listed plug for your bike and the recommended substitutions for it will all be "resistor" plugs (an "R" usually appears in the plug number), and you should use them. 

 

With a resistor plug, resistive plug wire is not usually needed, and it more or less doesn't matter what you use for a plug lead.  Conversely, a lot of car guys will use a single piece of resistor wire to connect the coil to the distributor, and run solid plug cables and non-resistor plugs without any RF emissions that show up as a problem.  The thing to remember is that electricity in any circuit sees the total resistance in the circuit as one, and it doesn't matter whether the resistance is evenly distributed or comes entirely from one component; an ohm is an ohm is an ohm, and it's all the same electrically.

 

"Super conductive" plug wires will not gain anything for you unless you provably have a condition under which your existing plug wire is cutting back your HT current to the point of causing a misfire (prevents a spark).  More current at the plug makes no difference once it's hot enough to ignite the fuel.

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Vehicles with solid state electronic ignitions and/or other systems on board need RF suppression in the ignition secondary to prevent electromagnetic interference with the system operation.  Normally, all that is needed is one point of resistance in the HT circuit somewhere, and the place normally used is the spark plug itself.  The listed plug for your bike and the recommended substitutions for it will all be "resistor" plugs (an "R" usually appears in the plug number), and you should use them. 

 

With a resistor plug, resistive plug wire is not usually needed, and it more or less doesn't matter what you use for a plug lead.  Conversely, a lot of car guys will use a single piece of resistor wire to connect the coil to the distributor, and run solid plug cables and non-resistor plugs without any RF emissions that show up as a problem.  The thing to remember is that electricity in any circuit sees the total resistance in the circuit as one, and it doesn't matter whether the resistance is evenly distributed or comes entirely from one component; an ohm is an ohm is an ohm, and it's all the same electrically.

 

"Super conductive" plug wires will not gain anything for you unless you provably have a condition under which your existing plug wire is cutting back your HT current to the point of causing a misfire (prevents a spark).  More current at the plug makes no difference once it's hot enough to ignite the fuel.

 

 

yes the pug is An R plug which usually means around 5k ohms.. and i do understand that its all calculated in a serie..

 

i guess the Oem wire is copper but i don´t know yet and lets say it has 2000 ohms in it vs 50ohms on the msd and the msd i really good at rm protection... 

 

Does less om = stronger spark yes or No?

 

I have no problems with my ignition but u know i want everything better.. so better spark better burn and cleaner burn?

 

Do u know if its ok to just screw the fibre wire exactly the same as u screw on a copper wire to the coil?

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"You" is spelled with 3 letters.

 

 

so better spark better burn and cleaner burn?

 

Nope.  It's only a question of whether the fuel ignites or not.  Once the flame is lit, the factors that control whether it burns completely and efficiently all reside in other systems. 

 

The two ares where stronger spark is apt to show up will be starting and extreme high RPM performance.  Systems with stronger spark are more apt to reliably produce a spark at cranking speeds, making starting more reliable IF the starting problem you have is related to a lack of spark part of the time.  Likewise, If you can run up against the rev limit without misfire, and have good plug life, hotter spark will do nothing to improve anything there, either.

 

Also, if the OEM plug lead is copper (or stainless, more probably) it will be way below 50 ohms, much less 2K.

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Read on the magnecore site.

The magnecore wire has a hell of a lot longer strand of wire wrapped around its core and has more resistance but is actually better at transferring the high voltage.

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Regardless, there's still no gain in it if the existing ignition is lighting the fire every time it's call on to do so. 

 

 

probably not.

but with an inductive ignition

theoretically....

it may help things reducing the voltage required to jump the gap and creating a longer duration spark

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for the crfs

a dynakit coil may help.

 

Shawn Mc had the idea that maybe the flameouts on the crf450s may be caused by insufficient fire power at low rpms and that closing the plug gap may help out.

he said that hondas are not know for quality ignition coils, so i looked into alternatives, and the best looks like a dyna kit coil. maybe it would help? maybe do nothing?

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but with an inductive ignition

theoretically....

it may help things reducing the voltage required to jump the gap and creating a longer duration spark

 

This helps in automotive applications where cruising mixtures can be almost too lean to burn.  Having the spark continue over 5-10 degrees or more of crank rotation gives the engine more time to find a gasoline molecule to light in all that air, so it reduces misfiring in such conditions.  Firing a degree or two or three late is better than not at all.

 

Generally no benefit to a motorcycle.

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This helps in automotive applications where cruising mixtures can be almost too lean to burn.  Having the spark continue over 5-10 degrees or more of crank rotation gives the engine more time to find a gasoline molecule to light in all that air, so it reduces misfiring in such conditions.  Firing a degree or two or three late is better than not at all.

 

Generally no benefit to a motorcycle.

Just to be clear.

My "probably not" was agreeing with your "probably not going to help"

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Understood.  Just pointing out something that it would actually be good for.  There's so much "snake oil" in the ignition aftermarket that it gets to be hard to separate the truly good stuff from the "fishing lures".

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for the crfs

a dynakit coil may help.

 

Shawn Mc had the idea that maybe the flameouts on the crf450s may be caused by insufficient fire power at low rpms and that closing the plug gap may help out.

he said that hondas are not know for quality ignition coils, so i looked into alternatives, and the best looks like a dyna kit coil. maybe it would help? maybe do nothing?

 

 

Honda uses Denso coils.  They are way better than the Mitsubishi crap on Yamahas.

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These "super ignition wires" are in the same category as things like Monster speaker wires. They do a great job...of taking your money.

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Honda uses Denso coils.  They are way better than the Mitsubishi crap on Yamahas.

 

 

In what way are they better? The Yamaha coils light the fire just fine, and rarely fail. I doubt that Yamaha's ignition coil failure rate is statistically any higher than any other brand.

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lol.

well judging fron your screen name wouldnt you say hondas are way better than the crap yamahas :thinking:

 

I know I got this screen name before I got my YZ.  In fact the only dirt bike I have ever had a coil fail on was my 87 CR.  Now, my R1 used to eat ignition coils for breakfast.  The CBR's never did that.  The Mitsubishi starters were also finicky on the R1.

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Well its always good from what i read to have a strong spark becaise the fuel burns and doesnt explode.. and tongive the mixture p stronger spark would theoretically give it a better burn and maybe increase the respons of the engine.

do anyone know how to get the the ignition wire plug dissasembled without cutting it to pieces?

And when using a fibre cable and not copper is it just to press it on the pencil sharp coil exactly the same as u do with copper cables?

And about speaker wires yes.. but if you buy a brand the chooses Monster Cable u cant Expect good results right?

I myself make all my own cables and uses 4 cables putninto 1 in a u dunno what its called in eglish but fyrfläta in swedish :)sounds good and looks solid

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Well its always good from what i read to have a strong spark becaise the fuel burns and doesnt explode.. and tongive the mixture p stronger spark would theoretically give it a better burn and maybe increase the respons of the engine.

 

 

None of this is even remotely true.

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