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Introduction and Cornering Whoa's

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  Good afternoon thumpers'!  Let me first introduce myself.  My name is Chris and I currently live in TN.  I just recently finished my first year of college and I am currently pursuing a new hobby (dirt biking).  I picked up a YZ250 dirt bike a few weeks ago and absolutely love the dirt bike and the community.  I have raced competitively on quads (YFZ450) and felt the need to transition to two wheels.  I have a couple of questions.  First let me tell you what I have done in terms of suspension tuning. I have set the race sag on my dirt bike to 102 with static sag set at 27 mm, ensured all bearings are tight, greased my rear linkage, and have two fairly new tires. My problem currently with cornering is my rear end feels like it wants to slide under throttle.  I always thought the primary concern with dirt biking is the front tire but on my bike it feels well planted.  Are there any specific techniques for calming the rear end other than weighting the opposite foot peg and remaining upright in the turn.  I also put a lot of weight emphasis on the front of the tank with inside foot toe up and out. Thanks guys.

 

Chris 

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Pehaps you are taking your dirt riding habits on the atv, and tansferring them over to dirt bikes..... which are 2 totally different appoach?

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Trust your tires.

 

Ride one gear higher so you don't whiskey throttle into the powerband and loose traction.

 

This technique helped me keep both feet on the pegs more woods riding.

I thought you were supposed to stay on the powerband when racing?  I figure he was more into racing since he said he used to race ATV's.  As far the rear sliding out, maybe approach it at a different angle with front steering..... like I said maybe you're transfering over your atv habits onto a bike.

 

Btw UncleLuke....... might that be your sister in your pic, or perhaps a cousin?  :)

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Try to keep your toes in. Keeping them out is just asking for your knees to get messed up when your toe catches on something.

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So guys, i have this totally awesome new pie recipe

I love blueberry pie. And cherry pie. And other pie

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What rear tire and what tire pressure are you running? How much do you weigh? Is there a chance you're sitting too much in front and the bike, when you gas it, doesn't squat because of that?

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Welcome Chris

Sounds like you understand the physics of bike setup and riding technique.

I would try:

Throttle control.

Increase race sag (lower in back).

Experiment with body positioning.

I have a very gutless dirt bike that I ride on forest service roads. I can pin it in the turns. If I sit back too far, the front will push (slide). When I get up on the tank, head over bars and foot out front, the front will stick like glue but the rear end will break loose and swing out. As I shift my body position back the rear will start to hookup and and come back in. Practice of figure eights will help refine this balance and throttle control.

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I used to have the exact same issue. I recently( about 3 months ago) solved this problem by forcing myself to keep my feet on my pegs for as long as possible into the corner.

I now corner way fast and do not slide around as much.

I sort of squat a little bit and then about half way through the turn I sit and stick my inside foot out and jump on the throttle. works every time for me.

you could give it a try and see if it helps

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The secret is to reduce weight of the bike and purchase a rekluse clutch, there are many posts explaining these adjustments.

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Oh yes, don't forget to use Rottella only, All these individuals will help you through your very long relearning period from your quad experience.

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Put as much weight as you can on the outside peg. It feels unnatural at first. Your weight on the seat when the bike is leaned over encourages the rear end to step out. Weighting the outside peg helps you keep traction and put more power to the ground.

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A few things you should know about this site; NEVER mention that you used to ride quads. If you post a thread, 80% of responses will be non related to your topic. Honda_Power is a complete troll. The pie references are directed at Honda_Power. Remember, there are no stupid questions.... but there are plenty of stupid answers.

 

As for your turning issue, the video posted above me pretty well explains that.

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