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SS chain adjuster bolts?

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Hey guy just had a quick thought about the adjuster bolts for the chain that go into the swing arm. Seems like they break off in the swing arm. This has never happened to me but would using stainless bolts and grease prevent this better then regular bolts with grease?

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Doesn't matter what kind of steel you use for those bolts, seized is seized. As stated, a dab of lube or anti-seize prevents this. Stainless sticks in aluminum just as easily as mild steel.

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Yep, aluminum and steel don't mix.

Pb blaster is fine initially, but will chemically react to different metals long term. I've experienced this.

I recommend, using waterproof wheel bearing grease, coat the parts and remove them and clean frequently, 2-3 times a year. Obviously reapplying each time.

Anyhow, you should be cleaning and lubing linkages and swingarm and steering head at same time. I know you just wanted to ride as much as possible, its sunny. Well doing this regiment 2-3x a yr, saves money and headaches long term.

Peace out.

Edited by ridngslikecrack

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The inside of your swingarm can get water/moisture/dirt inside...and sits on the end of that bolt...and corrodes it to death....as well...

 

Hence those little plastic caps on the side of your swingarm.

Edited by jeffdanger

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Stainless is weak.  All 300 series stainless alloys have a tensile strength around 60-70ksi.  That is the equivalent of  standard grade 2 bolt or metric class 4.8 bolt.  Your chain adjusters are a class 8.8 which is equivalent to a standard grade 5 bolt at around 120ksi tensile strength.  Stainless is not the solution but anti-seize is.

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And don't "gunk the crap" out of the bolt, if you do, you will be fighting dirt instead of corrosion....a little dab goes a long ways.

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Gunk the crap out of it there is not much dirt inside of the swingarm but there is corrosion.  There are small holes drilled in it to vent gasses during welding and that is where much of the corrosion comes from.  Don't use copper based anti-seize compounds, though.  they are not friendly to aluminum.  You really don't need anything special, though.  Even the grease you use for everything else on your bike is good enough.

 

If you are afraid of dirt sticking to grease there are some odd greases that don't have an affinity for dirt.  Look into calcium sulfonate or silica thickened greases.  Silica thickened greases are not good for bearings but are the best for rubber components.

Edited by 1987CR250R

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