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I have been considering getting my suspension revalved and getting new springs. I'm wondering what the difference will be with race tech vs stock parts? and also... what else do you all recommend I do besides those 2 things for my suspension? if there are even other things to do

thanks!

Edited by ImAHondaMan

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I have been considering getting my suspension revalved and getting new springs. I'm wondering what the difference will be with race tech vs stock parts? and also... what else do you all recommend I do besides those 2 things for my suspension? if there are even other things to do

thanks!

springs and valving are the 2 main things with suspension. It will make a big difference if its setup for what you ride.

This.

If set up properly, it will change your world.

If not, it will also change your world. Lol

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Whoa, hold on there!
One should always have the proper springs for your weight.
Revalves are another story however. If you are using the bike for its intended purpose (like using and mx bike for mx), then a revalve will just give you another version of mx suspension that probably won't really be that much different than what you started with, and may or may not be better. Revalves are really useful when you are using the bike for a purpose other than what it was designed for (like using an mx bike for woods riding/racing), or you are pushing the bike way beyond what a typical rider does (like your are super fast, or super heavy, or both). That's when you get value in a revalve.

If you are a beginner to intermediate rider, and you are using the bikes or it's intended purpose, I would just get the correct springs for your weight, and have the suspension serviced when the springs are installed. Then learn to use your clickers to get the best set up for your conditions.  It's not like these suspension companies and independent tuners have some secret knowledge about basic mx suspension that has escaped the engineers, designers, and test riders at the major manufacturers.  Rather, they can help you when you want or need something really different.

Edited by rpt50

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I have been considering getting my suspension revalved and getting new springs. I'm wondering what the difference will be with race tech vs stock parts? and also... what else do you all recommend I do besides those 2 things for my suspension? if there are even other things to do

thanks!

When I got springs for my weight and gold valved racetech suspension for my cr I felt like I had a new bike. It was awesome and worth it in my case and now I'm a racetech fan. I just did my forks for my Beta 525 a few months ago.. gold valved and resprung too.. (I had a new longer shaft shock already bought earlier).  A local mechanic that is a racetech tech did mine for me in both instances. The difference for the cr was night and day and I felt more confident riding and felt more comfortable and could just ride better with less effort. I had never done my suspension before so I was concerned that I would spend all this money and not get much in return..     I must say that you could just service your shock and fork and just change springs for your weight if you don't want to spend as much money.I rode my friends cr that had just his cr suspension serviced and it was pretty good considering.  I had always heard about gold valves and wanted to try to see what the fuss was about.

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Whoa, hold on there!

One should always have the proper springs for your weight.

Revalves are another story however. If you are using the bike for its intended purpose (like using and mx bike for mx), then a revalve will just give you another version of mx suspension that probably won't really be that much different than what you started with, and may or may not be better. Revalves are really useful when you are using the bike for a purpose other than what it was designed for (like using an mx bike for woods riding/racing), or you are pushing the bike way beyond what a typical rider does (like your are super fast, or super heavy, or both). That's when you get value in a revalve.

If you are a beginner to intermediate rider, and you are using the bikes or it's intended purpose, I would just get the correct springs for your weight, and have the suspension serviced when the springs are installed. Then learn to use your clickers to get the best set up for your conditions.  It's not like these suspension companies and independent tuners have some secret knowledge about basic mx suspension that has escaped the engineers, designers, and test riders at the major manufacturers.  Rather, they can help you when you want or need something really different.

This is not all correct. These engineers do know a lot however they are setting these bikes up for a wide range of riders in a wide range of terrain which will give a wide range of satisfaction. A revalve is nothing more than shrinking this "wide range" of performance to one person. Before you can justify a revalve you should have the suspension sprung correctly. Next would be to know what the bike is doing that you don't like so the tuner will know what needs changing either by clickers, oil or a revalve. If you never notice the suspension then I can say it is working for you.

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Ive heard a good few people say to go back to a check plate mid to get a really good woods fork.

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Sorry wrong thread I posted my previous reply into

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Whoa, hold on there!

One should always have the proper springs for your weight.

Revalves are another story however. If you are using the bike for its intended purpose (like using and mx bike for mx), then a revalve will just give you another version of mx suspension that probably won't really be that much different than what you started with, and may or may not be better. Revalves are really useful when you are using the bike for a purpose other than what it was designed for (like using an mx bike for woods riding/racing), or you are pushing the bike way beyond what a typical rider does (like your are super fast, or super heavy, or both). That's when you get value in a revalve.

If you are a beginner to intermediate rider, and you are using the bikes or it's intended purpose, I would just get the correct springs for your weight, and have the suspension serviced when the springs are installed. Then learn to use your clickers to get the best set up for your conditions.  It's not like these suspension companies and independent tuners have some secret knowledge about basic mx suspension that has escaped the engineers, designers, and test riders at the major manufacturers.  Rather, they can help you when you want or need something really different.

This times 69!!! Very well put. weantright's post is accurate also but requires knowledge and experience the OP did not indicate.

Edited by YHGEORGE

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Whoa, hold on there!

One should always have the proper springs for your weight.

Revalves are another story however. If you are using the bike for its intended purpose (like using and mx bike for mx), then a revalve will just give you another version of mx suspension that probably won't really be that much different than what you started with, and may or may not be better. Revalves are really useful when you are using the bike for a purpose other than what it was designed for (like using an mx bike for woods riding/racing), or you are pushing the bike way beyond what a typical rider does (like your are super fast, or super heavy, or both). That's when you get value in a revalve.

If you are a beginner to intermediate rider, and you are using the bikes or it's intended purpose, I would just get the correct springs for your weight, and have the suspension serviced when the springs are installed. Then learn to use your clickers to get the best set up for your conditions. It's not like these suspension companies and independent tuners have some secret knowledge about basic mx suspension that has escaped the engineers, designers, and test riders at the major manufacturers. Rather, they can help you when you want or need something really different.

thank you very much!

how much should I expect to be charged for new springs and valves plus labor?

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Price plays a role in where you are, what type of shop and where or if you need to send it. Personally I would not use Race Tech for woods/endure riding. However if they are in your backyard then frequent trips to them would be a plus.

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I don't know what year cr you have. I had an 01 cr 250.. I found this on the racetech website and just used the suspension calculator and was honest and plugged in information . It worked excellent in my case. Look around and get whatever info from different sources. Maybe there's another company /person locally for you that might work well for you as far as doing your suspension. There was great information on the racetech site.

 

http://racetech.com/ProductSearch/1/Honda/CR250R/2001

 

http://racetech.com/page/id/30

Edited by hawaiidirtrider

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Whoa, hold on there!

One should always have the proper springs for your weight.

Revalves are another story however. If you are using the bike for its intended purpose (like using and mx bike for mx), then a revalve will just give you another version of mx suspension that probably won't really be that much different than what you started with, and may or may not be better. Revalves are really useful when you are using the bike for a purpose other than what it was designed for (like using an mx bike for woods riding/racing), or you are pushing the bike way beyond what a typical rider does (like your are super fast, or super heavy, or both). That's when you get value in a revalve.

If you are a beginner to intermediate rider, and you are using the bikes or it's intended purpose, I would just get the correct springs for your weight, and have the suspension serviced when the springs are installed. Then learn to use your clickers to get the best set up for your conditions.  It's not like these suspension companies and independent tuners have some secret knowledge about basic mx suspension that has escaped the engineers, designers, and test riders at the major manufacturers.  Rather, they can help you when you want or need something really different.

When a bike is set up properly by a good tuner and you ride it you will say;

Whoa, hold on there!

I can go at a faster pace with more control. Why do I feel so confident on this bike.

Granted springs will get you in the range of 50% to 60% of your improvement.

That said the last 40% can hit a sweet spot that can save you "seconds" per lap and be safer doing it.

Many bikes especially earlier models did have inherent suspension flaws that springs do not fix.

I recently had a vet intermediate competitor that races every weekend for years and years, come in for suspension upgrade.

His first! I kinda pressured him trackside to come in.

After he picked it up he called from the track saying it saved his bacon when he cleared a large double by a bit too much.

Because he was carrying more speed.

I have since done three of his bikes.

He came by recently with T shirts with my name on them as a thank you. Said he has not lost a race since I did his suspension.

I put him on my website a couple weeks ago.

Many riders I suggest only do springs and service. If they are not using up their suspension than why spend money.

But if you race or are an aggressive rider,

Get your suspension set up by a pro just for you. Once you do every bike you own will be done as you will know how good it can be.

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