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what kind of plastic is the front number plate made of?

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I've got a 2004 230 and have mounted a GoPro on the front number plate. It works very well except for a resonance frequency in mid-range. Which means that when I'm on a trail and run at about half-throttle at about half redline, the camera, number plate and who knows what else vibrate in sync. This (1) makes a huge amount of noise and (2) vibrates the image a ton.

I'd like to glue some reinforcing ribs on the back side of the number plate. So I want to use the same type of plastic and a compatible glue.

I can't figure out what type of plastic it is (i.e. ABS, PVC, etc.)

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I know this isn't an answer to you your question, but I have experience mounting GoPro cameras to various types of equipment.  I don't think you will ever get a stable image off the number plate.  Why not mount it to the handlebar or even the forks at the top of the fender? 

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On All three on mine. They use white plastic. The BBR has an aftermarket (vented) front, white, # plate.

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I know this isn't an answer to you your question, but I have experience mounting GoPro cameras to various types of equipment.  I don't think you will ever get a stable image off the number plate.  Why not mount it to the handlebar or even the forks at the top of the fender? 

 

There isn't much room free on the handlebars with the brushguards. The bars are fat tapered ones, and I don't see space for a mount there.

Can you please expand on what you mean by "forks at the top of the fender"? I'm not understanding what you are suggesting.

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You can make a simple mount with a strip of flat metal that spans between and attaches to the bottom set of bolts on the triple.  You will have to make two bends in the metal and clearance the bottom for the fender, but you can make the entire thing with a bench vice, a drill, and a grinder. 

 

The camera will get smacked around pretty good in that position if you are riding in the woods, but no more than if it was mounted on the number plate.

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Aluminum angle  and flat stock can be your friend, I've used it to construct chain saw carriers, speedo mounts, etc.  Easy to work with wood working tools, no rust, etc.

One way to reinforce the number plate is to attach alumium angles using aluminum rivets.

You could also build a Go-Pro mount that attaches to the two forward bar clamp pinch bolts ala TrailTech Vapor protector/mounts.

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Surely mounting a GoPro directly to the CRF will result in an unwatchable blur-fest?  I've found that the chesty mount is by far the best way to go as your legs, arms and bod absorb a lot of the vibrations.  I'm always on the lookout for new camera angles and would love to see some actual video from interestingly mounted CRF cameras.

 

My stuff is here if anyone's interested: https://www.youtube.com/user/myraltis666

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Surely mounting a GoPro directly to the CRF will result in an unwatchable blur-fest?  .... I'm always on the lookout for new camera angles and would love to see some actual video from interestingly mounted CRF cameras.

Here is one of mine, there are others. I would not call it a blur-fest, and most of the time, when its not in harmonic resonance, it seems fine. But when the revs match, its a mess.

These are not terribly interesting, but it does show me on my 230F

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Fair enough, I take it all back, not bad at all.

 

Is mounted to the white bit above a headlight or a full number plate?  My white bit of plastic above the headlight unit flaps around furiously on the trails.

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Here is a link to a photo of the mount. 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/the_old_curmudgeon/13806093923/

It works well except for when the resonance hits. Which is why I want to know what kind of plastic it is, so I can glue in some brackets and change the resonant frequency. You can't eliminate the resonance, but if I can move it up, I won't be in it often. Right now, it resonates right in the center of where I typically ride.

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The only thing I'm certain about is it is a thermo plastic and difficult to glue. So I suggest using rivets to add weight and/or stiffen the number plate with aluminum angles. Increasing the mass will (on edit) lower the resonance frequency, but stiffening the structure will increase the resonace frequency.

Edited by Chuck.

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Yes, that is why I'm looking for exactly which plastic it is. It makes a difference.
I think that adding weight can lower the frequency, which is not at all what I want. Stiffness will raise it.

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Its high density polyethylene and you can't glue it. Silicone will stick sorta for a while if you have lots of bond area but it will still peel easily. Rivets or bolts only. 

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 high density polyethylene and you can't glue it. 

thanks, I looked it up, usually called HDPE, and you're right, you can't glue it. Well, 99% of glues don't work. There is one that works after you heat treat it.

But apparently you can weld it.

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I have a lot of experience trying to repair HDPE whitewater kayaks. Many glues say they will work but fail miserably on these plastics. The flame prep makes sense I'll have to try it next time. The fundamental issue with successful glue joints in plastic is getting the glue to mix or dissolve into the plastic. When you think of aggressive plastic glues like for PVC, they are always solvent cements that actually melt the plastic. 

 

The inherent problem with polyethylenes is that no solvents will soften them. Any adhesive must stick to the surface and not actually bite into it. The flame prep tries to give you a better surface. This is never as good as a fusion bond and its hit or miss whether they will work for you. Go for meticulous prep and lots of surface area. For instance rather than gluing ribs which have little glue area, you might try gluing a pad or wide strips. 

 

If it really matters, try to avoid glues or back them up with mechanical fasteners. 

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might I sudjest (shoegoo) you can find it at hardwear stores , it in a red tube .  it is great for plastic and is removeable with some prying . just clean area with alcohol and blob it on .

 it has to set overnight and will require some clamping .  I've used it to put the rear view mirors back on my truck . some trim on a hood of a mazda . on my RC trucks for the electronics .

 and I think it even fixs shoes ....

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