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Stripped screw help

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I stripped one of the screws on my carburettor last night, I tried using a vice grip but that did not work it just slipped off. Is there any other way getting it out beside drilling it out? Don't won't to do that just yet incase there is another way

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DONT USE HEAT ON A F'N CARB!!!! JFC........ I've had to remove screw from carbs by drilling/grinding the heads off....Sux. Make sure you have the proper replacement screws before doing so.

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I stripped one of the screws on my carburettor last night, I tried using a vice grip but that did not work it just slipped off. Is there any other way getting it out beside drilling it out? Don't won't to do that just yet incase there is another way

Oh man, that sucks, can't help you here.  Sorry but it looks like you're screwed........ kekekekeke.  Get it? Screwed?  Ummmmm, yeah.

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I stripped one of the screws on my carburettor last night, I tried using a vice grip but that did not work it just slipped off. Is there any other way getting it out beside drilling it out? Don't won't to do that just yet incase there is another way

Good luck getting the screw out. Just be patient and I'm sure you can have success without wrecking anything. The Philips screw is a piece of garbage that in most cases should have been discontinued years ago.

When you do get it out.....There are hex head replacement screws available that I would highly recommend. I use them on all of my carbs. For a couple bucks or less it's nice to know you'll never have a stripped screw head again. You just have to be careful because with a hex head it can be easy to apply too much torque and strip out the material on the carb itself ;)

Edited by Fattonz
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I stripped one of the screws on my carburettor last night, I tried using a vice grip but that did not work it just slipped off. Is there any other way getting it out beside drilling it out? Don't won't to do that just yet incase there is another way

 

My mentor taught me how to rejet bikes, and he was very assertive when telling me to be VERY careful when removing the float bowl screws.. because this can so easily happen. 

 

If the vice grips won't do it, try slipping the screw head into a bench vice.  Otherwise, gotta drill.

 

Or take a chance by trying to cut off the head of the screw with a hack saw. 

 

 

Oh man, that sucks, can't help you here.  Sorry but it looks like you're screwed........ kekekekeke.  Get it? Screwed?  Ummmmm, yeah.

 

HP you're gay.  KEKEKEKEKE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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Good luck getting the screw out. Just be patient and I'm sure you can have success without wrecking anything. The Philips screw is a piece of garbage that in most cases should have been discontinued years ago.

When you do get it out.....There are hex head replacement screws available that I would highly recommend. I use them on all of my carbs. For a couple bucks or less it's nice to know you'll never have a stripped screw head again. You just have to be careful because with a hex head it can be easy to apply too much torque and strip out the material on the carb itself ;)

 

I actually don't mind them now I've got an impact driver. Works mint.

 

Which is a good thing because my non KTM bike has heaps of phillips that are well seized.

 

Carb screws might be problematic though. I'd use the vice grips, failing that grind the sides to give more grip and vice grip again :D

 

OP could try a dremel and carbide tip. I spent 3-4 hours with one of those, a water pump bolt broke off in the block of my car. I drilled it and used a screw extractor, which broke.

 

Anyone else tried to grind hardened steel with soft aluminium all around it? thats "fun"

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I actually don't mind them now I've got an impact driver. Works mint.

 

Which is a good thing because my non KTM bike has heaps of phillips that are well seized.

 

Carb screws might be problematic though. I'd use the vice grips, failing that grind the sides to give more grip and vice grip again :D

 

OP could try a dremel and carbide tip. I spent 3-4 hours with one of those, a water pump bolt broke off in the block of my car. I drilled it and used a screw extractor, which broke.

 

Anyone else tried to grind hardened steel with soft aluminium all around it? thats "fun"

The impact driver is definitely a must have for working on bikes. It's especially useful for removing stator plates.

Just for those who don't know....because confusing the two could be disastrous.......Bushpig is not talking about an air impact driver, he's talking about a hand impact driver:

1024px-ImpactDriverWithBits.png

Could be the best $12 you ever spend ;)

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I actually don't mind them now I've got an impact driver. Works mint.

 

Which is a good thing because my non KTM bike has heaps of phillips that are well seized.

 

Carb screws might be problematic though. I'd use the vice grips, failing that grind the sides to give more grip and vice grip again :D

 

OP could try a dremel and carbide tip. I spent 3-4 hours with one of those, a water pump bolt broke off in the block of my car. I drilled it and used a screw extractor, which broke.

 

Anyone else tried to grind hardened steel with soft aluminium all around it? thats "fun"

 

I broke off a an EasyOut inside a seized bolt, terrible thing.  I nearly cried.

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Impact driver or smack on an old screwdriver if you don't have one .

The only difference between doing that, and using an actual impact driver is that upon impact the impact driver imparts an abrupt rotational action that can't be replicated with your hand...

Not saying your wrong Beau....just for the benefit of anyone who's unfamiliar with an impact driver ;)

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The impact driver is definitely a must have for working on bikes. It's especially useful for removing stator plates.

Just for those who don't know....because confusing the two could be disastrous.......Bushpig is not talking about an air impact driver, he's talking about a hand impact driver:

1024px-ImpactDriverWithBits.png



Could be the best $12 you ever spend  ;)

 

A VERY modest fee for the trouble it saves.

 

Having said that, I've found the 1/2 inch adapter works great in the pneumatic rattle gun  :lol:  :devil:

 

Obviously don't do small screws, just the larger more seized ones the hammer impact won't work on. 

 

Impact driver or smack on an old screwdriver if you don't have one . 

 

Yeah I tried that heaps and it doesn't work nearly as well as the impact driver. Anyone that doesn't have one, GET ONE!

 

I broke off a an EasyOut inside a seized bolt, terrible thing.  I nearly cried.

 

Yeah it was an identical product to an easy out, broke off inside the block. If I stuffed up there was no way to fix the block without being dodgy.

 

&%$#@! of a spot too, had to reach over the front of the car, hold the dremel and make sure it didn't kick into the aluminium.  :banghead:  :censored:  Like I said, I was there for hours and went through 3 tungsten carbide bits.

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A VERY modest fee for the trouble it saves.

Having said that, I've found the 1/2 inch adapter works great in the pneumatic rattle gun :lol::devil:

Obviously don't do small screws, just the larger more seized ones the hammer impact won't work on.

Ok......in the hands of someone experienced :) ......... but if advising someone new to wrenching who may be reading this thread?

Edited by Fattonz

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The only difference between doing that, and using an actual impact driver is that upon impact the impact driver imparts an abrupt rotational action that can't be replicated with your hand...

Not saying your wrong Beau....just for the benefit of anyone who's unfamiliar with an impact driver ;)

I agree just most people don't own an impact so smack an old screwdriver to see if it will break loose ( most cases it will on small stuff ) if not i'd do the needle nose vise grips , or grind the head off with a dremel then pull the threads. You can't offend me fattonz  :lol: everyone on here is right. 

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Ok......in the hands of someone experienced :) ......... but if advising someone new to wrenching who may be reading this thread?

 

Fair enough, only use the rattle gun on LARGE screws the hammer impact driver won't shift.

 

Also, 

 

Although it seems like a good idea when inebriated, an angle grinder is not the ideal tool to remove the leaf spring shackle off of your car.

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Sledgehammer and blowtorch.

 

Oh. Um. Usually u can drill the head off and get a hold of the threads with a pair of your best trusty pliers.

Im imagining it being the float bowl screw.

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