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Setting up my bike for the dunes

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Relating to the other thread I posted about shipping my bike to Oregon, what should I do to setup my bike for theS dunes??  Here are my thoughts, having never ridden strictly dunes on a dirt bike before.

  • Sand paddle rear tire.
  • Conventional chain, not o-ring.  I've heard more than once that o-ring chains don't do well on the dunes because the sand grinds away the o-rings.  Plus my chain isn't long enough to make room in the swingarm for sand paddle by moving the wheel back. 
  • Gonna talk to my suspension guys about how to set things up for the sand.  Maybe move the forks down ¼" in the triple clamps for stability. We'll be moving fast mostly, but also riding trails through the piney woods on the dunes.
  • Removing pipe guard and skid plate (no rocks to crush things).
  • Installing FMF Powercore II silencer, if spark arrestors are not required.
  • Rejetting bike for sea level and temperature.

Any thoughts are appreciated, thanks!

 

Real thoughts, HP.  Don't be a d0uche b@g

Edited by LovingOffroadPain
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Never really had to make any changes to my bikes. Always ran my o ring chain and never had a problem getting a paddle in there. Paddle is not much taller than q brand new knobby. More body position and riding style than anything else. You will want to make your front light or it goes everywhere. What r you riding and how many paddles?

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Never really had to make any changes to my bikes. Always ran my o ring chain and never had a problem getting a paddle in there. Paddle is not much taller than q brand new knobby. More body position and riding style than anything else. You will want to make your front light or it goes everywhere. What r you riding and how many paddles?

 

KTM 300 with an 18" wheel.  As a kid, I remember that if the sand tire has too many paddles, the scoops would ride on top of the sand and not dig in.. don't wanna buy that tire!!

 

How many paddles you recommend?

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Relating to the other thread I posted about shipping my bike to Oregon, what should I do to setup my bike for theS dunes??  Here are my thoughts, having never ridden strictly dunes on a dirt bike before.

  • Sand paddle rear tire.
  • Conventional chain, not o-ring.  I've heard more than once that o-ring chains don't do well on the dunes because the sand grinds away the o-rings.  Plus my chain isn't long enough to make room in the swingarm for sand paddle by moving the wheel back. 
  • Gonna talk to my suspension guys about how to set things up for the sand.  Maybe move the forks down ¼" in the triple clamps for stability. We'll be moving fast mostly, but also riding trails through the piney woods on the dunes.
  • Removing pipe guard and skid plate (no rocks to crush things).
  • Installing FMF Powercore II silencer, if spark arrestors are not required.
  • Rejetting bike for sea level and temperature.
Any thoughts are appreciated, thanks!

 

Real thoughts, HP.  Don't be a d0uche b@g

We don't have dunes close by, but I run deep, heavy snow in the spring. The experience is a lot different for my engine than the rest of the season. In the snow my throttle is an on off switch. It's either idle or wide open. If I tried that the rest of the season I would be spending a lot of time looking up at the sky... I suspect, for the engine, that riding sand is a lot like riding snow...

So what I am getting at is that your engine is likely going to be spending most of it's time in the high revs, running on the main jet vs any other style of riding. So after you jet for elevation and temp....consider going a size or two richer on the main jet to promote cooling ;)

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250Fs get a 6 paddle, 450s get an 8. 

Trim your little shock guard flap a couple inches. Paddles can grab it and tear it up.

Doesnt hurt to have it jetted on the rich side. The dunes at sea level are a high load.

Some people use outerwears on their air filter.

Some people use chain wax so the sand doesnt stick so much. 

If you can manage to wash it, its a good idea not to let it sit overnight with the salty sand on it.

Pin it, lean back and have fun! Im from Oregon. Been there a ton of times. When the weathers nice, its gorgeous out there.

I believe flags are required on bikes now.

I believe spark arresters are required....but ive never run one.

I know theres a db limit and occasionally theyll come out and check...

Edited by jeffdanger
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KTM 300 with an 18" wheel.  As a kid, I remember that if the sand tire has too many paddles, the scoops would ride on top of the sand and not dig in.. don't wanna buy that tire!!

 

How many paddles you recommend?

Pain an 18" rear tire has essentially the same outside diameter as a 19". It's the inner diameter of the rubber that differs. This gives the 19 a slimmer profile. The 18" looks badass because it's so much meatier with that taller side wall. The 18's are less likely to have pinch flats so they're usually favoured for off-road...

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8 blade will work well.  You will be wide open more often than not. You have to have flag, ATV safety card, spark arrestor, and sound is limited to 93db. They do enforce to some degree. Expect no one to watch out for you. Dunes have the highest percentage of stupid people hands down!

Edited by Fat Tony
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Pain an 18" rear tire has essentially the same outside diameter as a 19". It's the inner diameter of the rubber that differs. This gives the 19 a slimmer profile. The 18" looks badass because it's so much meatier with that taller side wall. The 18's are less likely to have pinch flats so they're usually favoured for off-road...

Indeed. The downer is that pro moto racers get sidewall flex with the 18s. Not a prob offroad

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I use a 10 paddle on my 450.  Two paddles in the sand at all times.  Very little spin, but will bury you quick in the fluffy stuff if you're not careful with it.  The normal to harder packed sand is awesome with the 10 paddle though.

 

Dave

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I have duning the Coos Bay area for over 25 years. So I have got some time in, out in the sandbox. Low air pressure in the front tire especially I run about 4lbs. O-ring chains are just fine. Make sure you are legal, off road permit, parking pass, flag, riders card. The decibel limit really is not a big concern. I would look for a good flag mount that mounts the flag towards the back of the rear fender, the others ones cause problems of getting in the way, and the ones that attach to the axel like to put the flag into the wheel. I watched a steel whip break the rear brake caliper off a brand new ktm just a couple of weeks ago. I also find knobby  tires to be more fun than a paddle. I have ran both on many different bikes, and I personally like to slide around. The best piece of advice that I can give you is show up during the weekdays, all of the idiots will be at work making it a better riding situation. I hope you have a god time.

 

If you are driving here make time to see Crater lake and follow the Cascade Lakes scenic drive ( Century Drive ) if you have the time.

Edited by Dune bum
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Pain an 18" rear tire has essentially the same outside diameter as a 19". It's the inner diameter of the rubber that differs. This gives the 19 a slimmer profile. The 18" looks badass because it's so much meatier with that taller side wall. The 18's are less likely to have pinch flats so they're usually favoured for off-road...

 

Fatt you're preachin' to the choir!!  lol but you're right.  Nothing worse than someone (like HP) preaching to the choir, and they are dead wrong in everything they say.  It's almost unbearable to watch (but fun to feed our disfavor for HP).

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I have duning the Coos Bay area for over 25 years. So I have got some time in, out in the sandbox. Low air pressure in the front tire especially I run about 4lbs. O-ring chains are just fine. Make sure you are legal, off road permit, parking pass, flag, riders card. The decibel limit really is not a big concern. I would look for a good flag mount that mounts the flag towards the back of the rear fender, the others ones cause problems of getting in the way, and the ones that attach to the axel like to put the flag into the wheel. I watched a steel whip break the rear brake caliper off a brand new ktm just a couple of weeks ago. I also find knobby  tires to be more fun than a paddle. I have ran both on many different bikes, and I personally like to slide around. The best piece of advice that I can give you is show up during the weekdays, all of the idiots will be at work making it a better riding situation. I hope you have a god time.

 

If you are driving here make time to see Crater lake and follow the Cascade Lakes scenic drive ( Century Drive ) if you have the time.

 

Right on!!

 

Good info for air pressure, 4 lbs seems like nothing but the dunes are a different animal than most offroad riding. 

 

At Winchester Bay dunes, YouTube videos I've watched show that Banshee Hill has gotten really wide.  It used to be a tight two-track (I never climbed it because I was on a Blaster).  My skill is a good A rider, is Banshee Hill very difficult if you have a well setup big bore bike?

 

There are tons of hidden trails off the main dunes, but I n't recall where the really good ones are.  Winchester Bay dunes have what we called "Sand Gullys," dunes that stretch into the East from the main dunesd by the coastline.  The best trails are hidden, only really good riders can get to them because they are off-camber down a dune, and if you can't climb out, you're stuck!  It's a hell of an adventure.  Any suggestions on where to find the better trails?

 

As a kid we lived in Medford, then Klamath Falls.  Crater Lake is beautiful, and I'm sure that I would appreciate it even more now that I'm an adult.  That's a must-do place to stop.

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The good trails and tree shots are mostly at the 'fingers'. The top of Banshee Hill is the 1st finger, there are three more as you go to the south. The far SE of Winchester has the best trails and hillclimbs.

+1 for low front tire pressure. I have tried a dedicated sand tire on the front and not found any difference.

Definitely encase the air filter in panty hose or an outerwear to keep the sand out of the foam- you'll never get it out with cleanings and it will eventually hit the engine.

I remove the rear mudflap and run a shock cover to keep the sand off the shock shaft. Sandblasting that is no bueno.

I have a bracket that mounts on the sub frame bolts for the flag mount, works much better than the axle mount.

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8 paddle, especially if you've never run one just for the experience, it's pretty cool. I get pinch flats if i run less then 8 psi. I made a plate with some holes that i could zip tie my flag too, the plate fit snugly in my camel back. I made sure the flag was the correct height with me sitting on the seat. I like that set up best over rear axle mounts and rear fender mounts.

Edited by Die_trying

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The good trails and tree shots are mostly at the 'fingers'. The top of Banshee Hill is the 1st finger, there are three more as you go to the south. The far SE of Winchester has the best trails and hillclimbs.

+1 for low front tire pressure. I have tried a dedicated sand tire on the front and not found any difference.

Definitely encase the air filter in panty hose or an outerwear to keep the sand out of the foam- you'll never get it out with cleanings and it will eventually hit the engine.

I remove the rear mudflap and run a shock cover to keep the sand off the shock shaft. Sandblasting that is no bueno.

I have a bracket that mounts on the sub frame bolts for the flag mount, works much better than the axle mount.

 

Why remove the mud flap??  You can adjust the wheel far enough back not to destroy the mud flap right?

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Depending on the bike and how worn your chain is you can get away with not removing the mud flap, just play it by ear. I didnt have to on mine. I want to emphasize jetting!!! I went up on the main jet and ran it richer but still too lean and melted my piston, given this was on a 125 so obviously I was riding the hell out of it which didnt help.

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Depending on the bike and how worn your chain is you can get away with not removing the mud flap, just play it by ear. I didnt have to on mine. I want to emphasize jetting!!! I went up on the main jet and ran it richer but still too lean and melted my piston, given this was on a 125 so obviously I was riding the hell out of it which didnt help.

 

I knew a guy in high school who did the same thing to his 125.  My 300 smoker jetting from the spec book is spot on, but for the dunes (and the humidity of Oregon's coast) I'll jet it to sea level, but one richer on the main and the needle. 

 

How well or poorly could a 125 pull a paddle tire??  I've always been told you need at least a 250 to do the dunes justice.

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I knew a guy in high school who did the same thing to his 125.  My 300 smoker jetting from the spec book is spot on, but for the dunes (and the humidity of Oregon's coast) I'll jet it to sea level, but one richer on the main and the needle. 

 

How well or poorly could a 125 pull a paddle tire??  I've always been told you need at least a 250 to do the dunes justice.

personally I would not run the dunes with a 125, but a lot of guys run 125's with a paddle and do quite well.

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