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Hello, I just got a ttr230 (2010) and it is new.  I am wondering what I need to do to break it in. Thanks

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Hello, I just got a ttr230 (2010) and it is new.  I am wondering what I need to do to break it in. Thanks

It's 4 years old, how can it be new?

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Service manual will tell u all sorts of things to do, but with that bike just take it easy for a couple tanks of gas and change your oil a couple times and itll pretty much run til were all dead n gone.

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I mean if you want to go all crazy rip it all down and grease everything. The japs do a shit job on pivot areas(swing arm, headset,,ect.) greasing bearing surface and bearings. Other than that yeah a couple tanks of fuel oil change  after every tank, adjust and lube the chain, check it for leaks and rip.

Edited by poconovfr
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pocono does have a point. Before you ride it you should go over it and check all fasteners, and add grease to the linkage bearings, swingarm bearings and steering head bearings. They only put enough grease in them at the factory to keep them from rusting during transport and storage.

 

The axles should also be removed and greased, and anti-seize or grease should be put on the chain adjuster bolts.

 

I also peel the rubber covers up on my wheel bearings and add grease to them, but I'm a bit anal about everything...:smirk:

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Word. Yeah dude and if that bike was packed away in the back corner of some dealer chances are you should pull the carb and give it some love as well. And check the battery.

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I would only use high test fuel in it to avoid any long term carb issues and also will give better performance, 93 or 92 octane, not sure what you have available in your area. I'm pretty sure the TTR230 is made in Brazil though, not Japan. Awesome bike, I have really enjoyed mine.

Edited by Dirt Racer

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I would only use high test fuel in it to avoid any long term carb issues and also will give better performance, 93 or 92 octane, not sure what you have available in your area. I'm pretty sure the TTR230 is made in Brazil though, not Japan. Awesome bike, I have really enjoyed mine.

 

 

Higher octane does NOT "give better performance" unless the engine pings on lower octane.

 

It also has nothing to do with "carb issues". Tier 1 gasolines have detergents in all octane grades that will help reduce deposit build-up.

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Higher octane fuels are recommended for all high performance engines, burns cleaner and is a slower, more controlled explosion in the cylinder, no one can contest that. Also, if you let regular unleaded sit in your carb for extended amounts of time, usually in a short amount of time it will clog the shit out of your jets, this I know is fact, has never happened to me with high test fuels. Regular unleaded is total crap, I have seen the effects of detonation on quite a few others machines after tear down. I won't run that in any machine I own, especially with all the ethanol shit they put in fuel today, it burns a lot dryer. I have always run higher octanes and always will and will always recommend it to anyone wanting to take care of there machine, i'm no certified ASE mechanic but have done a tremendous amount of work in the 25 years in atv and motorcycle riding and wrenching I've done.

 

Higher octane does NOT "give better performance" unless the engine pings on lower octane.

 

It also has nothing to do with "carb issues". Tier 1 gasolines have detergents in all octane grades that will help reduce deposit build-up.

Edited by Dirt Racer

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Higher octane fuels are recommended for all high performance engines, burns cleaner and is a slower, more controlled explosion in the cylinder, no one can contest that. Also, if you let regular unleaded sit in your carb for extended amounts of time, usually in a short amount of time it will clog the shit out of your jets, this I know is fact, has never happened to me with high test fuels. Regular unleaded is total crap, I have seen the effects of detonation on quite a few others machines. I won't run that in any machine I own, especially with all the ethanol shit they put in fuel today. I have always run higher octanes and always will and will always recommend it to anyone wanting to take care of there machine, i'm no certified ASE mechanic but have done a tremendous amount of work in the 25 years in atv and motorcycle riding and wrenching I've done.

 

 

You might have done a lot of wrenching, but you know absolutely nothing about fuels. Nothing you've posted is correct, other than high performance engines recommending higher octane.

 

The TTR230 is NOT a "high performance engine", nor does the manual recommend high ocatne for it.

 

Octane has absolutely nothing to do with burn rate, or BTU content. There are a lot of myths about fuels floating around the internet, such as higher octane burns slower, runs cooler, makes more power, makes less power, burns cleaner, etc...and none of this is true. Octane rating simply has nothing to do with any of this. The octane rating of a fuel is nothing more than a scientifically determined measurement regarding the fuel's ability to resist auto-ignition (ignition without an external source, commonly known as detonation).

 

Ethanol can indeed cause deposit formation, but almost ALL pump gasolines in the U.S. contain ethanol, regardless of the octane rating.

 

If you want to debate fuels, let's have at it, but unlike you I actually know what I'm talking about.

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When I ran non-oxygenated Sunoco 110 octane gas mixed 50/50 with 93 octane pump gas in my 2009 WR-250F (the bike was uncorked but 100% stock as far as engine internals went), the bike ran noticeably crappier and made less power, feeling as if I'd left a rag sitting over the airbox intake.

 

Actually, in all of the Jap dirt bikes I've bought (brand-new) over the years (since 1984), they all had enough grease on the chassis bearings that would have allowed the bike to live a reasonable amount of time before the first teardown for a regrease.

I always tore my new bikes down out of peace-of-mind and even curiosity and believed in knowing for sure versus just assuming all was well, but out of dozens of YZs and TTs and DTs and WRs (and even their street sport bikes), I can't recall one "holy shit!" moment.

They sometime did not have oodles of wasted excess grease oozing out of the area between the steering head bearing races or in the space between the swingarm pivot needle bearing of the swingarm (but sometime they did), so maybe that's what guys are looking for.

 

Also, one of the main reasons (if not the main reason) I believe in checking stuff on a new bike is that, unless you are near one hell of a tightly-run ship of a motorcycle dealership, the guys assembling your new bike from the shipping crate are typically on the bottom of the Service Dept. totem pole, down there with the lunch errand boy and the after school newb.

Possibly one and the same person.

Edited by YZEtc

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When I ran non-oxygenated Sunoco 110 octane gas mixed 50/50 with 93 octane pump gas in my 2009 WR-250F (the bike was uncorked but 100% stock as far as engine internals went), the bike ran noticeably crappier and made less power, feeling as if I'd left a rag sitting over the airbox intake.

 

 

So naturally, instead of learning how to tune properly for the fuel you chose, you just blamed the fuel... :rolleyes:

 

When you switch to a fuel with a different vapor curve than what the bike is tuned for, you have to change jetting and ignition advance.

 

A stock engine WILL run better with a properly selected race fuel than it ever will with the crap that comes our of gas pumps, provided you tune for it. 

 

It's all in the vapor curves. Pump fuel has a 90% evaporation point and End Point in the 385F-485F range, which doesn't work well at all in our engines that have very short intake tracts. A race fuel that has a 90% and end point in the 200F-300F range will have far less liquid fuel entering the combustion chamber to leech heat from the combustion process, and will need leaner jetting to run properly because more of the fuel actually evaporates and burns. But you'll be rewarded with crisper running and more consistent jetting than you will ever get from pump fuel.

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Ok, so, the buck stops with you, you are the utmost authority on all things motorcycle, with your own in house fuel test and research facility and research anywhere else is shit. I've seen you come on this forum and systematically make anyone that differ's from what you claim to "Know" out to look like a complete idiot. With all knowing advice like yours, most would rather not even post. I'm not gonna get into a pissing match with you or anyone else over anything, I've got nothing to gain or loose by offering anyone advice, what I have read, known and applied has never failed or mislead me and that is what I stand by, in spite of what you think. That's about as diplomatic as I'm gonna be about this and your smart ass attitude, you keep your opinion to yourself and I will do the same.

 

You might have done a lot of wrenching, but you know absolutely nothing about fuels. Nothing you've posted is correct, other than high performance engines recommending higher octane.

 

The TTR230 is NOT a "high performance engine", nor does the manual recommend high ocatne for it.

 

Octane has absolutely nothing to do with burn rate, or BTU content. There are a lot of myths about fuels floating around the internet, such as higher octane burns slower, runs cooler, makes more power, makes less power, burns cleaner, etc...and none of this is true. Octane rating simply has nothing to do with any of this. The octane rating of a fuel is nothing more than a scientifically determined measurement regarding the fuel's ability to resist auto-ignition (ignition without an external source, commonly known as detonation).

 

Ethanol can indeed cause deposit formation, but almost ALL pump gasolines in the U.S. contain ethanol, regardless of the octane rating.

 

If you want to debate fuels, let's have at it, but unlike you I actually know what I'm talking about.

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Actually, I'm not "blaming the fuel" for anything, but stating here that I didn't need that stuff to ride and enjoy the bike, not to mention saving money in the process.

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