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How to Tie Bike Down on Trailer

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Hello,

 

I am buying my first trailer to tie down my first dirt bike today. http://www.tractorsupply.com/en/store/carry-on-trailerreg%3B-4-ft-w-x-7-ft-l-mesh-floor-trailer-1600-lb-payload-capacity I am buying this one today to pull by my Honda Accord LX.

 

What all do I need to tie the bike down? Can someone explain how to tie the bike down. I have a KDX 220? Picture example would be nice. 

 

Also, will tieing the bike down damage the suspensions? If so, anyway to avoid this? Maybe 2x4 wood between the fender and tire.

 

Thank you.

Edited by goodoboy

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I use soft straps on the bars. You don't completely compress the suspension just pull it down a couple of inches and it will not hurt it. Hope the pics help

Thanks Rctaz

 

Are you in Houston Texas? 

 

It looks like you are using the same trailer I plan to buy.

 

What hooks are you using mounted to the wood?

 

What size trailer you have?

 

Thanks

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I have a 5x8 trailer and I went with flush mount d rings in the floor but you don't have to do that. I'm in the Austin area. I'll take a couple more pic in a minut

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Also, will tieing the bike down damage the suspensions?

no.

some of the internet will say it does, but, in reality it doesn't.

the two things people will say is that keeping the springs compressed causes them to "take a set" or get weaker. but that's not how the physics of springs works. springs aren't affected by staying compressed unless they are compressed beyond their elastic limit (which i doubt is even possible while they are installed in a fork). cycling springs wears them out, not leaving them compressed.

some people also think it hurts the seals. not in my experience. and, again, seals wear from sliding up and down the fork tubes, not from having staying stationary with some pressure behind them. what really hurts them is sliding up and down dirty fork tubes...especially when you don't clean them after a ride and the dirt dries and gets hard and the seals have to slide over that hardened dirt.

 

Maybe 2x4 wood between the fender and tire.

if you are going to use a fork brace thingie (i suggest you don't), get a purpose made one that has wings that engage the forks. the 2x4s can fall out (the tire flexes a bit as you go over bumps and the 2x4 can work loose). when it does, you don't have enough tension on the straps (don't have the suspension compressed far enough because the 2x4 stopped you from compressing it further) and they can come unhooked as the suspension compresses going over bumps. then they can fall off and your bike can fall over.

also, here is another vote for soft ties.

Edited by LittleRedToyota

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I also used a wheel chock I picked up from cycle gear

Thank you Rctaz,

 

How did you mount the wood in the trailer?

 

How much tension do you put in the tie?

 

Thank you

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I dont use a fork brace or a 2x4 for support. Theyre good without it.

I tie it down a few inches with soft ties.

I try to minimize tie down time and release the tension if its gonna be tied down more than a day.

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Thank you Rctaz,

 

How did you mount the wood in the trailer?

 

How much tension do you put in the tie?

 

Thank you

I just pull the front end down a couple of inches or so. The only tension on the straps is the suspension trying to come back up. Thats hard to describe for some reason lol. As for the d rings I just used a router on the wood and used 1/8 plate on the back side to sandwich the ring to the wood

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I use the same chock system that Rctaz does and they work well. I found that on the trailer I had problems with the rear tires bouncing and shifting. The directions that came with the chocks said to use rear straps as well. I did this and the bouncing problem was solved.

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no.

some of the internet will say it does, but, in reality it doesn't.

the two things people will say is that keeping the springs compressed causes them to "take a set" or get weaker. but that's not how the physics of springs works. springs aren't affected by staying compressed unless they are compressed beyond their elastic limit (which i doubt is even possible while they are installed in a fork). cycling springs wears them out, not leaving them compressed.

some people also think it hurts the seals. not in my experience. and, again, seals wear from sliding up and down the fork tubes, not from having staying stationary with some pressure behind them. what really hurts them is sliding up and down dirty fork tubes...especially when you don't clean them after a ride and the dirt dries and gets hard and the seals have to slide over that hardened dirt.

 

if you are going to use a fork brace thingie (i suggest you don't), get a purpose made one that has wings that engage the forks. the 2x4s can fall out (the tire flexes a bit as you go over bumps and the 2x4 can work loose). when it does, you don't have enough tension on the straps (don't have the suspension compressed far enough because the 2x4 stopped you from compressing it further) and they can come unhooked as the suspension compresses going over bumps. then they can fall off and your bike can fall over.

also, here is another vote for soft ties.

 

I see now. Well, i will just have to see what happens

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I just pull the front end down a couple of inches or so. The only tension on the straps is the suspension trying to come back up. Thats hard to describe for some reason lol. As for the d rings I just used a router on the wood and used 1/8 plate on the back side to sandwich the ring to the wood

Do you tie down the back tires as well?

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Ok, 

 

I went picked up a 4x7 trailer today.  http://www.tractorsupply.com/en/store/carry-on-trailerreg%3B-4-ft-w-x-7-ft-l-mesh-floor-trailer-1600-lb-payload-capacity

 

I purchased two ratchet straps.

 

Where do I strap the two straps to? Do I use the the mesh floor holes like the attachment shows.

 

bikeontriler_zpscef701a6.jpg

 

All lights work and the bike fit perfectly on the trailerfronttire_zpsbbe9693d.jpg

hookedupto1_zpsdfbee876.jpg

 

 

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Use the frame rail for now until you can get you self a couple grade 8 I bolt at least 5/16 diameter and drill and install them in the lower frame in the front of the trailer. I'll find an example and attach it shortly

image.jpg

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Ok, 

 

I went picked up a 4x7 trailer today.  http://www.tractorsupply.com/en/store/carry-on-trailerreg%3B-4-ft-w-x-7-ft-l-mesh-floor-trailer-1600-lb-payload-capacity

 

I purchased two ratchet straps.

 

Where do I strap the two straps to? Do I use the the mesh floor holes like the attachment shows.

 

bikeontriler_zpscef701a6.jpg

 

All lights work and the bike fit perfectly on the trailerfronttire_zpsbbe9693d.jpg

hookedupto1_zpsdfbee876.jpg

 

That's not secure at all...and don't tie a bike on the kickstand. Use the example RCTAZ gave you in the second post, and plz use a bike specific fork brace....loose the ratchet straps for some decent cam style ties.

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Sorry but this is harder on my iPhone. You need to gab a couple of eye bolt like it in the pic and drill and install them in the frame part of the trailer

image.jpg

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