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XR650R on the road with no cush drive

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I just got my 650r plated, and I will be riding it around town as well as taking roads out to trail riding areas. How hard is it on the drivetrain to ride on the street without a cush drive rear wheel? I cleaned the dirt and rust off the splines of the cs shaft and sprocket, and put on a little moly grease, as recommended for 650L bikes. Can/should I put on a 650L rear wheel? That big piston no doubt puts a pretty big shock load through the trans and chain..

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I wanted to add some kind of cushion myself but I only found 1 solution - use clutch basket with cushions that HINSON RACING HIGH PERFORMANCE CLUTCH BASKET seems to have, but I'm not sure about that.

There was also a guy that made a TE610 wheel work, but it's not bolt on.

650L has no cush drive too.

The engine seems to withstand pavement even without cush-hub of any sort but rear tires wear out really fast because of it

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RAD make a cush hub, but expensive. 
Kush sprockets is an option http://www.kushsprockets.com/products/honda-xr-600-xr-650l-rear-dampening-sprocket
but heard they wear out quite quickly. 

I ride mostly street on a XR600 and had Dunlop Traimax tires. Changed to Michelin T63 knobbly tire and have a smoother ride as the knobs act as cush. Wear is ok......

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my 2000 650R have been streetlegal and ridden dualsport without any cush since it was new, me personally have owned the bike for eight or nine years I think, some offroad, some ice, a lot of street, bike is still running hard, the gearbox have never missed a beat and feels firm and positive.

I don't really push the bike that hard though, except for the occasional wheelie....

 

a cush drive would of course be beneficial, but unless you do supermoto\hard riding on tarmac, I wouldn't consider it a mandatory upgrade.

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iv seen your vids pills and yes you can wheelie .... hows that cr500 going ?

 i was under the impression they cam stock with a clutch cush rubbers in the basket , i hinson do 1 but i thought they had them stock

anyways . i street ride mine and have over 90,000 kms in it and no issue's

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As I recall, the 650R has somewhere around 20 more horsepower than the L.  While there are those who suggest no harm will be done to the drivetrain for the same model driven primarily on the street, the simple fact that other dual sport models come standard with a cush speaks volumes...

 

I have the L and a cush drive was one of the FIRST mods I did to the bike.  I purchased mine from RAD and the unit is very well built, there was no "buyer's regret".

 

It is your bike, your money, but if I owned one, it would not be on the street WITHOUT a cush drive, particularly if you ride quite a few miles.  My L is going on 22,000 miles now and I have ZERO detectable countershaft spline wear.  Would it be the same had I not installed the cush?  Maybe, maybe not.  I'll spend the $500, sleep a little better and worry a little less when I am on the road...

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Ok great info, thanks. As long as the consensus is a little street won't hurt it, then Im not going to worry about it. I won't be doing a lot of street riding.

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Don't lug it. I know a lot of people talk about low end torque, but running a single cyclinder engine with a light weigtht flywheel at low RPM will hammer the transmission. Also don't shift without the clutch. For reference, a hit-and-miss engine does'nt have a light weight flywheel; tens of pounds.

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XR650R has a stock cush clutch assembly.  It doesn't need a cush wheel hub.  The stock XR650L rear hub does NOT prevent destruction of the countershaft splines...

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This thread would support what was just said by dweller:

 

 

http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=441937&page=420

 

http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=409774&page=897

 

 

Appears as though the xr650r does have a cush clutch.  Perhaps this day should become a holiday on Thumber Talk....to mark the  moment when a very important and constantly nagging question is definitively answered once and for all.

Edited by oldmanrip
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This thread would support what was just said by dweller:

 

 

http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=441937&page=420

 

http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=409774&page=897

 

 

Appears as though the xr650r does have a cush clutch.  Perhaps this day should become a holiday on Thumber Talk....to mark the  moment when a very important and constantly nagging question is definitively answered once and for all.

 

The things you learn here!  Looking at the parts diagram, you would never know.  I wonder if it would fit the L???

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Any shocks or virations must got through the transmission before they reach the clutch and the undamped springs in the clutch basket do not have the same damping charachteristics as rubber like what is used in cush hubs.

A cush hub prevents shocks from reaching the transmission. Old Honda four cylinder bike from the CB family had a Hy-Vo primary chain connecting the crankshaft to the transmission. The point where the chain drove the transmission had rubber dampers iside of the sprocket, inside the engine. A lot of older motorcycles used cush hubs along with center stands, but both went away as production cost increased. Harley Davidson recently started putting cush hubs on some of their touring models.

Even manual transmission cars and trucks have springs in the clutch. Springs in the clutch are for damping shock into the transmission from the engine, not from the road through the transmission.

A cush hub is simply the best way to protect the transmission from road induced shocks, the springs in the clutch serve a different purpose.

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One thing I noticed during my latest chain/sprocket change is the front sprocket (countersprocket) had some play when I inspected it, significant enough to be concerning.  There did not appear to be any wear on the splines.  The countersprocket had nearly 20,000 miles on it and maybe the product of a bad habit (replacing the countersprocket every other chain replacement.

 

When I put the new countersprocket on, there was ZERO play and fitment was tight.

 

I wonder if some of the issues associated with countershaft spline wear are the product of not replacing the countersprocket during a normal drivetrain service.  I know that having noted this wear, from now on a new countersprocket will go on EVERY TIME I replace the rear sprocket/chain, which is what I probably should have been doing anyways...

Edited by condershire

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Wow, thanks omr! Mystery solved, case closed, end of story, etc. I think the most damaging shock into the trans will come from the crankshaft, rather than coming up the chain from the wheel. Crank torque is multiplied about 3x by the primary drive, while torque feedback from the rear wheel be reduced by about 3x by the sprocket gearing. I suspect Honda put the effort into the clutch basket for the most effective protection for the money. I am going to ride the heck out of my 650r without another thought about it, other than to avoid severe lugging.

This thread would support what was just said by dweller:

 

 

http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=441937&page=420

 

http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=409774&page=897

 

 

Appears as though the xr650r does have a cush clutch.  Perhaps this day should become a holiday on Thumber Talk....to mark the  moment when a very important and constantly nagging question is definitively answered once and for all.

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i too have put thousands of miles on my xrr and have had zero problems. but like posted before i always use the clutch when on pavement.(now dirt is a different story)

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