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How many hours is good for a 450?

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Im looking at buying a CRF450R it has 58 hours on the bike? is that too much or just around right? I want this bike to last me a long time!

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Hours is nothing, how it was maintained is more important.

What year is this 450?? A bike will last a long time, but the big money for any 450, especially early-mid 2000s Hondas, will be valve jobs/motor rebuilds.

Maintenance is key. I had two bikes fall apart over the course of the few years I owned them bc I didn't maintain them adequately. Bought my 1st new bike in '10, it works flawlessly now bc I comb it over every ride.

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Hours are easily lied about

 

This.

 

My bike under reads 20 hours because I broke the original meter.

 

And thats a bike that came with one.

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1 Hour. If the bike lives past one hour its a miracle. Yes there are a lot of them out there that have lasted past one hour, but some don't. Some of the pros send the rod out of the front of the block right at the start gate. You have to think its a 450cc motor capable of making over 50 HP and having the ability to rev 12,500 RPM, and have a less that an inch and a half skirt on the piston. These are pure race motors. 

 

I gave you all of this to let you know unless you know how the bike was ridden by the prev owner you have no idea when it will be time for the rebuild. Its a crap shoot. 

 

All you can do is look the bike over. Look at the motor see if there are any hits taken to the motor. See if any leaks are visible. If you have the cash in hand let the guy know that you want to pull the valve cover off. All you need is a 8mm socket and a 10mm socket and it only takes about 15 minutes. Throw a feeler gauge under the rocker arm and cam and see if it looks like valves are moving. If that looks good and you are sure you are taking it home pull the oil drain plug on the motor and trans and see if there is any nasties or if the oil looks to be as old as the bike is. Bit excessive I know but it will give you peace of mind. 

 

And remember the bikes appearance says a lot about the riders maintenance habits. Really clean bike usually means that the person loved it. At least thats what I have noticed.  

 

And I know that the beginning of my comment is a bunch of crud, but its true that there is a major difference between Joe Blow who may get 60 to 80 hours on stock titanium intake valves, and Ricky Carmichael. If you know the guy, and his riding style great, but if you don't know the guy do those simple checks and save your self some time and $. 

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maintenance is key, can’t argue about that. i am impressed with the Honda motors through which is one of the reasons why i switch from a KTM. i had a buddy who rode the heck out of his 07 450. he was riding it three times a week, racing it 2-3 times a month in the intermediate class. i think he had like 300 hours on it before it was time to do the valves. he changed the oil frequently and used only Honda oil that he would buy from the dealer. Comparing his bike to my 07 SXF, i changed the oil every 5-7 hours and at 80 hours i opened it up just to change out the rings as preventative maintenance. The rings were pretty worn, which surprised me a bit since i was very meticulous on oil and filter maintenance.

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It's from my local honda dealer so they would of checked over it and service it before they will sell it. I can do all of the maintenance required

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I don't trust when people put the hour meter on or dealership even more than that soooo

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Hours are VERY important. You can change the oil and clean the filter after every ride thats great, but if the bike has 200+ hrs on the motor then guess what, it is ready for a complete rebuild. It could be a 2014 and have many many hard pounding hours from a hard charging pro racer and that is not a bike I would want to buy.

Edited by mrmoto35
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It's a 2012 model or Theres a 2010 model as well which is a bit cheaper :)

The 2012 would be a MUCH better option. They both have great motors and better heads than the 07 and down models, but the 2010s chasis and suspension setup are pretty weak and it makes for a rough ride. The 2012 is set up so much better and handles WAY better than the 2010 could ever think of...just my two cents!

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Condition is "key."

 

Look the bike over, if it looks ragged out odds are the engine is probably in the same shape/condition. Pride is self evident. If the guy took care of the bike, it will show. 

 

Good luck.

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The project bike I just got had an '04 motor in it that fired 1-2 kicks every time and it actaully sounded ok. Thankfully I didn't care about the motor. When I pulled the valve cover off I found something had gone through the cam and left a 1/2' grind scar on the cam There was a chunk gone from the cam holder, probably the piece that went through the cam, and the holder was cracked nearly in half. The oil in the head stunk like burnt tranny fluid. The valve cover bolt towers were stripped. One of the cam gear bolts was loose. The intake retainers had round grooves beaten into them. Two of the gears in the tranny had teeth broken in off. The crank woodruf key was sheared off and it took a full air impact on the flywheel puller to get the flywheel off. The clutch basket was notched. I didn't mic the cylinder but I am sure it is out of spec. The carb had an R&D pilot screw but the small washer and o-ring were missing

 

But hey, the bike looked pretty decent! I traded something for it that I got for free so it was fine but it really reminded me how buying a race bike like these can sometimes be a crap shoot

Edited by mrmoto35

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The 2012 would be a MUCH better option. They both have great motors and better heads than the 07 and down models, but the 2010s chasis and suspension setup are pretty weak and it makes for a rough ride. The 2012 is set up so much better and handles WAY better than the 2010 could ever think of...just my two cents!

I disagree. Went to the dealer in the spring of 12 to buy a new CRF450r & ended up picking up a left over 10 model & saved around $2K in the process. It's basically the same bike chassis, suspension & motor with some refinements to the 12 model. I talked to FC about it before the purchase & they said there were no advantages to the 12 suspension over the 10 model. I did read an mx article on the 12 having upgraded fork tubes for better flex, but didn't think it was worth the extra $2K for me.

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I disagree. Went to the dealer in the spring of 12 to buy a new CRF450r & ended up picking up a left over 10 model & saved around $2K in the process. It's basically the same bike chassis, suspension & motor with some refinements to the 12 model. I talked to FC about it before the purchase & they said there were no advantages to the 12 suspension over the 10 model. I did read an mx article on the 12 having upgraded fork tubes for better flex, but didn't think it was worth the extra $2K for me.

I guess its the way i worded it, i apologize...its the linkage on the 2010 that made the bike so hard to handle in corners; however, the one you bought could very well have the linkage upgraded to help resolve the issue. They had the same problem with the 09-11 models, while fixing it in 2012 to handle MUCH better from the factory. Its not anything that cant be fixed, but i like to buy a bike to ride. Not buy a bike to fix then ride. Also, needless to say, a lot more goes into factor when purchasing one of these bikes (or any used bike for that matter) than how they came from the factory or what known issues either had. Whats the price difference? How many hours on each? Any upgrades? Do they look like they were maintained and taken care of? And so on...

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I guess its the way i worded it, i apologize...its the linkage on the 2010 that made the bike so hard to handle in corners; however, the one you bought could very well have the linkage upgraded to help resolve the issue. They had the same problem with the 09-11 models, while fixing it in 2012 to handle MUCH better from the factory. Its not anything that cant be fixed, but i like to buy a bike to ride. Not buy a bike to fix then ride. Also, needless to say, a lot more goes into factor when purchasing one of these bikes (or any used bike for that matter) than how they came from the factory or what known issues either had. Whats the price difference? How many hours on each? Any upgrades? Do they look like they were maintained and taken care of? And so on...

No need to apologize just setting the facts straight for others that read. A serious rider will redo the suspension from the factory, but if your looking for stock vs. stock then yes the 12 is a tad better with the refinements. Owned an 09 & have ridden 11 / 12 & didn't feel the 12 was a MUCH better bike. FC did the 10 suspension & have an excellent set up for mx on the 09-12 models & doesn't require an aftermarket linkage. I asked about purchasing their linkage combined with the suspension work &they told me that it was no longer needed due to the new valving specs.

Here's a quote from motocross action mag on the rear linkage referring to the 12 being close to the 10 in specs.

A: The 2012 CRF450 shock is unchanged from 2011, but it works differently because it is attached to a totally new rising-rate linkage. The new rising rate, achieved by a reconfigured bell crank and pull rods, is softer across the board than last year’s all-new bell crank and pull rods, which were stiffer across the board than the 2010 rising-rate system. The 2012 setup is closer to the 2010 curve than the 2011 rate. On the plus side, the new link lowers the rear of the bike by 5mm.

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I disagree. Went to the dealer in the spring of 12 to buy a new CRF450r & ended up picking up a left over 10 model & saved around $2K in the process. It's basically the same bike chassis, suspension & motor with some refinements to the 12 model. I talked to FC about it before the purchase & they said there were no advantages to the 12 suspension over the 10 model. I did read an mx article on the 12 having upgraded fork tubes for better flex, but didn't think it was worth the extra $2K for me.

The pistons in the base valves are different in the forks as well. I found this out because bto sent me ones from an 09-11 model and the hole for the shaft is smaller on those than the '12. The '12 uses the same race tech gold valves as the Kawi's did. But your right, not worth $2k, just another small difference that isn't really brought up anywhere. Oh yeah and stiffer fork springs as well.

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