Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  

XR650R: Broke Bolts off in Bottom Triple Tree Clamp

Recommended Posts

All-

I have a 2001 Honda XR650R. 

Snapped two bolts in the lower clamp of the triple tree.

Would it be best to take it to a machine shop, motorcycle shop, drill/tap it myself, or order a used triple tree off ebay?

Motorcycle shop quoted me a minimum of 250 to do the job. 

Thanks!

Bob

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd try a x-out set.

Basically you use their bits, drill a divot in the end, then switch bits the second one runs in reverse in a drill and grabs bolt and backs it out. Unless they're cross threaded. That's a whole different ball game.

Then you may be cheaper to have a shop fix it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Try what crack recomended. If you completely botch it up, you can you can put helicoils in the bodgered up hole(s). If you butcher it beyond repair, get a triple off of eBay. You'll still be into it for less than what the machine shop quoted you.

 

Oh... get an accurate torque wrench when you reassemble it. Triple clamp bolts take less oomph than you think.

Edited by ThumpNRed
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As long as theyre not corroded or crossthreaded, they should come out pretty easily with a reverse drill bit or ez out.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

if you think about it ,, i would lube it up over night then get a drill bit and go from the other side ..... it should bite in and then back the bolt out

Edited by Sean-0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It cost me less than 20$ to extract 2 bolts remains from a crf lower triple, make a bigger thread with 2 custom bolts and restore 2 threads from the other side in my friends machine shop, but he lowered the prices. I think that for 250$ they want to buy new lower triple, at least that would make some sense for that price.. In fact I bought a used CRF Fork with a bit rusted triple clamp for about that price!

If a machine shop will demand more than 50$ I would try to make it all myself, you can always do a USD fork conversion if you fail  :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One extra wrinkle:

I broke a Black Carbon Oxide bit (left hand) off in the hole as I was trying to reverse-thread.

Now I have a case-hardened bolt (about 1/2") to drill thru PLUS a HARD drill bit wedged between the threads and bolt. 

HELL.

Burn it out? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been there, that sucks. You buy the highest quality screw extractor made of the gnarliest hardest stuff on earth, snap it off and now you get to try and drill it out. Bummer. I like the idea of drilling through from the back but it sounds like the bolts are too tight for the drill bit alone to grab and twist it out. Maybe drill from the back then tap the hole you just drilled with right hand threads and insert a bolt. Now you can put a wrench on it to screw it through. Just thinking out loud.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

FIxed! Thanks to all!

Solution: Heat Aluminum triple clamp with MAP gas torch. Get hot. Drilled thru the bolt/broken EZ-out with a hard drill bit, FROM THE BACK. 

Popped right out and shot about 45 feet across the garage. Stupid little F***er.

Was able to re-tap the original M8x1.25 threads back into it and use stock bolts!!!

Can anyone recommend a good, small torque wrench for handling torque specs on a small machine like a dirtbike? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You don't need a torque wrench for such things..Up to pressure and a fraction more..It's all about feel.

A torque wrench is only required for internal engine components such as cylinder bolts,,head bolts and the

like..You do not use one on small stuff..Learn the feel method and you'll never break bolts again..I'm shocked

you managed to snap those fork bolts,,that's slightly crazy goings on.. :facepalm:

 

A torque wrench is not required for any nut or bolt that can be seen on the external of any engine or frame ..

Edited by Horri

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You don't need a torque wrench for such things..Up to pressure and a fraction more..It's all about feel.

A torque wrench is only required for internal engine components such as cylinder bolts,,head bolts and the

like..You do not use one on small stuff..Learn the feel method and you'll never break bolts again..I'm shocked

you managed to snap those fork bolts,,that's slightly crazy goings on.. :facepalm:

 

A torque wrench is not required for any nut or bolt that can be seen on the external of any engine or frame ..

 

Is this for real?

Never heard of such a theory...interesting...

Why does Honda provide torque specs for each external bolt on the bike if they are not supposed to be torqued to spec???

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

horri is completely correct... IF you are a competent mechanic with EXPERIENCE,,, in my line of work i see many home mechanics ham fist bolts and destroy shit... 99% of the time the cost of fixing their stuff up is much more than a shop would have charged to do the job the first time...

 

if you have little experience with bolts and tools  etc then i reckon a torque wrench is a good tool to have in the box... 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know the PO already found his solution here, but thought I'd post my 2 cents for anyone else with a seized up bolt. If a bolt seems like it is anywhere near seized enough to shear off, I apply a liberal amount of "PB Blaster" penetrant & let it soak in for awhile (overnight if really bad, reapplying several times). That stuff is amazing! If it's still a no go, I then apply heat with a torch. I'd be careful on Aluminum parts, but this will break it free a lot of times.

Another trick is to try tightening the bolt minutely (not enough to twist it off!!). Sometimes tightening it a fraction more will also break it free in a way that you never could have done just backing it out alone - the only problem to this method is if the bolt is already over tightened in the first place! Bugga. You need to have a feel for bolts, both tightening & loosening, so that you don't go twisting them off all the time, lol.

Anyway, these are some of the methods that I have used over the years successfully. Hope they are some help to someone.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:

Sign in to follow this  

×