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What's your opinion on engine ice?

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I've hear good and bad things, I have a 2010 crf 250r with bore kit. And I'm boiling coolant. What's everyone's five cents on this stuff? I'm debating

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Yeah I didn't realize I was loosing coolant, ever since I bored it. It boiled over in 4 hours! And when I pulled off the track I left off the gas. Then just died. Wouldn't start back up. Gray smoke came out the exhaust. Hoping I didn't nuke it!!!

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It's good, but Red Line Water Wetter is way cheaper and works just as well.

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distilled water + water wetter provides the most efficient heat transfer...but also boils at a lower temp than antifreeze (including engine ice).

too many people don't understand the important difference between *coolant* temps and *engine* (particularly head) temps. the engine parts (particularly the head) still produce the same amount of heat. if the *coolant* is not getting as hot as quickly, it's because it it not sucking the heat out of the actual engine parts (the head) as efficiently.

but, assuming you are going to use some sort of antifreeze (as opposed to straight distilled water or something like evans--which is a whole other topic)...

engine ice is antifreeze...pre-mixed with water. it's just a different type of antifreeze from the more common kind. engine ice is propylene glycol (mixed 50/50 with water). most antifreeze is ethylene glycol (which is also widely available pre-mixed 50/50 with water).

the big advantage propylene glycol has over ethylene glycol is that it is much less toxic.

ethylene glycol is slightly more efficient at heat transfer (i.e., pulling heat out of the engine parts) than propylene glycol...but propylene glycol can hold more heat per cc, so you need to circulate EG faster (but, most cooling systems are designed to run EG and, so, circulate the coolant fast enough).

they are both not as good at heat transfer as straight water. but, they both raise the boiling point and give you some extra room before your engine starts boiling over.

ideally, if you are not going to see temps below freezing, and you have an adequate cooling system, you would run straight distilled water (with some water wetter for corrosion protection and for its surfacant properties).

in reality, some bikes--especially those that come without fans--tend to boil over on hot days of tight, technical riding. using 50/50 antifreeze helps prevent--or at least delay--that boiling over.

but, whether you use propylene glycol (engine ice) or ethylene glycol (most antifreeze) probably won't make a huge difference. though if you do puke engine ice out in the woods, it is less likely to harm bambi--so that is something.

Edited by LittleRedToyota
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the big advantage propylene glycol has over ethylene glycol is that it is much less toxic.

but, whether you use propylene glycol (engine ice) or ethylene glycol (most antifreeze) probably won't make a huge difference. though if you do puke engine ice out in the woods, it is less likely to harm bambi--so that is something.

 

Bingo. This is the main reason that I use Engine Ice over ethylene glycol based antifreeze. Coolant tends to be the main thing that gets spilled when I'm on the trail, so I'd like to make as little impact as possible.

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The engines I deal with at work (9 inch bore and larger) can't use glycol based coolants because it does not transfer heat well enough and causes localized hot spots that cause cracked heads.  We use straight water with a nitrite based film forming additive for corrosion protection, usually either Nalcool 2000 or Pencool 2000.  If you could get your hands on a small quantity of this stuff it would certainly work well for a dirt bike.  A quart of it treats 32 gallons of water.  It makes finding coolant leaks easy because it leaves a nasty pink and white trail right to the source of the leak.

Edited by 1987CR250R
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