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'03 xr100 2step rev limiter.

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So we all have that friend that has the miraculous ability to break anything thing they touch.... That's my friend Charlie. Last time we rode he blew out most of the rear spokes and the time before that (we ran out of gas and ran some two stroke fuel in it).and he caught the oily fiberglass in the muffler on fire!

Has anyone ever thought of putting a 2 step Rev limiter on their bike, where I can flip a hidden switch before I let somebody ride it and it will bounce off the rev limiter at around 5/6k??

Hopeing socalxr might have done or heard of this.

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On my miniGP XR100 (street tires on pavement) I've been known to come out of "the straight" at near top speed for an XR100, grab a handful of brake, slam it down two gears and dump the clutch. The tires squeal as the engine revs hard. I don't think it's very easy to over rev a XR100. Now the transmission on the other hand has had an occasional false neutral and it's getting worse, probably in part due to my extreme engine braking.

 

You could build your own CDI, a friend of mine built several for my XT550. This is entirely possible with a home brew circuit.

Check out this site to get started, http://www.transmic.net/en/home.htm better yet, send a friend who is into building circuits to that page and let him go nuts, tell him you'll pay him in beer.

 

Oh, and don't be so hard on Charlie, spokes are tender things and if not properly maintained first one will break and before you know it, the whole wheel is gone. As far as the muffler on fire, it could have been much worse, a lean mix caused by displacing fuel with oil could have melted down your motor instead. I'd rather repack a muffler.

 

Good luck.

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We'll damn....... I do have a friend who could probably build one of those for me, I was kind of hopeing I could just solder in a resistor or something to a switch (on-the-fly) that would change the set value of 9600rpm to 5000rpm. But I've noticed nothing that custom can ever be that simple :( any companies out there that could build this for me so I can be sure it's going to be quality and not some contraption that we put together???

As for the spokes they were oem with no maintenance done.... Heavy duty stainless set should arrive tomorrow x)

Never thought far enough into it about the oil displacing the fuel causing a lean mixture... Oops

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Most people don't think about that stuff "aw, it'll smoke a little bit." Lucky nothing catastrophic happened. Nothing ventured, nothing goofed.

 

Someone who is competent at soldering circuitry (not me!) can put together a board that's quality and if you really want to invest the money, you can order a printed circuit board simply by drawing up something in a graphics program. They're not expensive in small quantities, but plain-Jane bread boards are like 10% the cost of small quantity printed circuit boards. Now when you order say 500, the cost becomes negligible.

I digress. Ask your friend to look at the circuit as well as your XR100's stator so he can see how much work is required to adapt it.

 

You probably could wire in a resistor or some other component on the stock CDI to make your goal happen. There's three problems. First, you need to get to it. These are often "potted" with acrylic or rubber. Potting is pouring an epoxy into the circuit mounted in a case to protect it from the elements and tampering. Un-potting a circuit can be a bear.

Next, if you haven't destroyed your CDI in the process, you need to map the circuit. This can be nearly impossible to do without destroying the circuit for a hobbyist, assuming that the components are still recognizable since some manufacturers scrape the identifying marks off integrated chips.

Last, you need to determine how to alter the circuit - which is the easiest part of the whole task.

 

That's why I think you'd be better off building one from someone else's plans.

 

Last comment on the spokes, it probably wasn't Charlie at all. Spokes need to be periodically checked and if any are significantly loose, the wheel needs to be retrued, simply tightening up the one or two loose spokes will only delay the inevitable failure of the system. A spoked wheel is truly a system, each spoke is dependent upon, usually, three other spokes on the wheel to work right. Whomever came up with the modern wire wheel was a pure genius.

Edited by Smacaroni

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Personally, I think I would not allow Charlie to ride my bikes anymore.

Sounds like he should ride his own bike from now on.

Plus, you could charge Charlie for working on his bike from now on...

You will then have extra cash for your own bike.

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Tokyo Mods makes a programmable box.  It's over $800, so I've never tried it.  But the stock box does not have a limiter.  I the dyno we hit 14k and not 100% fully completely maxed reved.  It was screaming, but not off the hook.  But it peaked at about 10.2k. 

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I may be wrong on this, but it sound as if you are blaming your friend for a lack of maintenance on your part. Sorry, but him blowing spoke out on the rear wheel was a lack of maintenance on your part. If you do not check and tighten them as needed, what do you think is going to happen? He just happen to be the unlucky person to be on the bike at the time it let go. Caught "oily fiberglass" on fire. It didn't get that way from running a little premix in the tank. Again this did not dawn on you there may be a problem with your bike?

Seems to me you a looking to solve a problem that does not exist with your friend. Putting a band aid on a nonexistent problem will just delay the inevitable. 

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