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Rusty chain.. help

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Just scrubbed mine last night.  All the "rust" on it was just on the surface.

 

Bucket, nylon brush, isopropyl and water.  Add chain.  Scrub.  Let it dry.  Lube it.  Reinstall chain.

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Wash bike, apply WD-40 to chain, ride, repeat.  Chain lasts the longest this way.  No heavy lube to catch dirt, no removing to soak, no scrubbing. Good times!  Plus, x-ring/o-ring chain is much lower maintenance than a standard chain.  By far.

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Ride it in the sand.  The rust will be gone and so will most of the chain.

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Thanks dor the advise guys!

Just scrubbed mine last night. All the "rust" on it was just on the surface.

Bucket, nylon brush, isopropyl and water. Add chain. Scrub. Let it dry. Lube it. Reinstall chain.

What is isopropyl? Cant i use diesel instead?

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i like used motor oil on a rag after you wash the chain... put some on... seems to soak right in

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Wash bike, apply WD-40 to chain, ride, repeat.  Chain lasts the longest this way.  No heavy lube to catch dirt, no removing to soak, no scrubbing. Good times!  Plus, x-ring/o-ring chain is much lower maintenance than a standard chain.  By far.

 

Pictures below are old chains and sprockets compared with the new ones (same product) which I am installing now on a KX250F that has seen many races and practices since the first set was new.  The comparative lengths of the chains are shown to see the difference between brand new and well used.  The used setup is still within spec, but close enough to replace.  Besides, I wanted to run two sets of rear wheels, one for deep sand and mud, and the other for soft/intermediate terrain, so starting new seemed appropriate.  The point is, the only thing that has touched this chain since around this time last year is a pressure washer and WD-40.  I think I adjusted tension twice, once after the fist practice, then once again at the beginning of this season.  This is much different than the constant adjustments I had become used to with non-o-ring chains.  This setup is an aluminum sprocket and gold x-ring chain from Primary Drive.  It held up much better than I would have expected.  Lots of hard riding.

 

Old vs. new is below:

 

Old is on the left.  Both chains are hung from the same height.

 

CHAINS1_zps0e6ad277.jpg

 

Here is the difference in length:

 

CHAINLength_zps9e40dee4.jpg

 

Here are the sprockets.  Top is new:

 

CHAINWHEELS_zpsb8db6fa9.jpg

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Trouble is most of us expect a chain to last more than a year and even with WD 40 the hardening of the o-rings does become an issue.  But most people don't think about it but sunlight is more of an enemy to the o-rings than oil is.  It all breaks down to the materials.  I would assume most chains use Buna-N because it is cheap and oil tolerant but its not so ozone and sunlight tolerant.  Neoprene would be better but is more expensive.  Viton would be awesome and Aflas would put chain manufacturers out of business because it would never wear out.

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Trouble is most of us expect a chain to last more than a year and even with WD 40 the hardening of the o-rings does become an issue.  But most people don't think about it but sunlight is more of an enemy to the o-rings than oil is.  It all breaks down to the materials.  I would assume most chains use Buna-N because it is cheap and oil tolerant but its not so ozone and sunlight tolerant.  Neoprene would be better but is more expensive.  Viton would be awesome and Aflas would put chain manufacturers out of business because it would never wear out.

 

I'm guessing it would have been fine to run the chain/sprocket combo through the end of the season, maybe more.  Just made more sense to replace the chain since I was putting two new rear-wheel sprockets on.  I measured 12 and 5/8 inches between 12 pins, so that is 12.625 inches.  The service limit is 12.7 inches.  I guess it sounds closer than it is.  I figure I had plenty of life left in that chain, and the sprockets speak for themselves.  My point was not that you would need to replace this setup after a year, but that this is what it looks like after a year.  Of course, a "year" is different in the Northeast than it is down south.  I wish I had an hour estimate, which would be more helpful.  Maybe 70 hours on that chain above, give or take.  The x-rings I took out of the master are still recognizable as x-rings, too.  Of course, we don't have to deal with as much sunlight as you do, lol.

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WD is good. If you wd40 it and ride, its gonna fling crap everywhere, u gotta wipe off as best u can after that and relube with chain lube.

 

Then...ride/lube more often.

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Wash bike, apply WD-40 to chain, ride, repeat. Chain lasts the longest this way. No heavy lube to catch dirt, no removing to soak, no scrubbing. Good times! Plus, x-ring/o-ring chain is much lower maintenance than a standard chain. By far.

I use an Amsoil product, HD Metal Protector. It's a no fling formulated chain lube that goes on like a thin coat if sealing wax and dries. So it doesn't attract dirt--in fact Amsoil is so bodacious that the electrochemical nuclear engineers they have stuffed away in a room 30 floors below the earths crust designed this product with a negative static charge. It REPELS dirt, or so it seems lol

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I use an Amsoil product, HD Metal Protector. It's a no fling formulated chain lube that goes on like a thin coat if sealing wax and dries. So it doesn't attract dirt--in fact Amsoil is so bodacious that the electrochemical nuclear engineers they have stuffed away in a room 30 floors below the earths crust designed this product with a negative static charge. It REPELS dirt, or so it seems lol

I got tired of trying different lubes, WD40 works for me. Even kerosene as a cleaner and lube in a pinch.

Mike

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