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Joe's 400S Mod Thread

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I bought a lightly used 2007 with a few mods already done. I plan on doing many of the usual mods I thought I would start this to help others since these are very common. Likely all of this info can be found elsewhere but it never hurts to have it consolidated with another user's input.

 

For reference, I'm no mechanic but I'm not all thumbs either so just about anyone should be able to do these. I have done some simple mods to my street bikes but that's about it. The important things to be armed with are the right tools and the right information. I wish I would have taken pictures during install of some of the things I've already done but oh well. Generally, parts don't come with great instructions and I learn better with pictures/video than I do from reading. Most of these I bought from the TT store and links/part numbers noted where applicable.

 

IMG_3367.JPG

 

PIVOT PEGZ:

This was the first think I received so first to install. These were relatively idiot proof but really didn't come with good instructions nor are there any tutorials that I could find online. You need to use the springs off of the stockers and if you pay attention to how the spring sits on the stock, you just need to duplicate it. Worst case, look at the other side.

 

What I learned: You need to take off the rear brake pedal. There's a cotter pin holding the bolt on so remove that first. Clean and lube the lever bolt/pivot while you are at it.

 

IMG_3372.JPG

 

DRC Edge Tail Light (D45-18-X06) w/Signals (part D45-60-20X):

The instructions on this are pretty good and it's very easy to install. For LED lights, you need to install resistors inline if you want them to blink at "normal" speed. I chose not to do this because I don't mind the faster flashing and I ride 90% off road anyway.

 

What I learned: You can buy stock connector pieces to be able to connect the new lights directly to the stock connectors to save from splicing all the wires. I didn't realize this until later so I spliced them. I used wire connectors with heat shrink ends as well as another heat shrink tubing over top for maximum water protection. Plan your final wire routing BEFORE connecting :).

 

IMG_3368.JPG

 

TT Case Savers (left & right):

These are about the most idiot proof installation there is. Apply RTV sealant to the back (wear gloves!) and apply. Loosen the brake lever (or remove) to allow room to fit it on the right side and "dry apply" the shields as a test first so you know how to orient them. Tape down once installed until it cures to make sure it doesn't slide or fall off while curing.

 

What I learned: The RTV goop tends to get on the front of the shield and can be a pain to remove, especially when dry as it gets in the micro-grooves. After making a bit of a mess on the first one, on the second one I taped over the outside with painters tape to prevent the mess. I marked the orientation of the logo so I knew which way to position it. The next day I peeled the tape off and it was perfect.

 

Race Tech Fork Springs  (part varies on spring rate):

I followed this video to replace the springs without completely removing the forks. The video is pretty good and easy to follow. Not too hard to do...I did it by myself but it would have been a lot quicker and easier with a helper.

 

What I learned: While the video briefly states that you need to move the headlight assembly, I also found that I needed to move the instrument (speedo, etc) cluster as it's in the way. I also started stripping one of the the fork cap nuts as it was super tight. Thanks to some help on here, I found out that you should loosen the upper triple clamp bolts because they squeeze the tube which locks in the cap. Once loosened, the caps turned easily. Finally, the video states that the springs have a narrow end. From what I've been able to find out, this only applies to progressive springs and since the Race Tech springs are linear rate, there is no tapered end and therefore no specific orientation.

 

IMG_3366.JPG

 

Pro Taper SE CR High Bars, throttle tube & Grips: Not much instruction here but I had a few learnings!

 

What I learned: I have a had a lot of bikes but never switched out the bars or grips before. I found out quickly that one grip is larger than the other to fit over the throttle tube. This is not obvious, nor is it noted on the packaging, etc. Also, I learned that the stock cables are NOT long enough to reach with ROX 2" risers and and the CR High bars. The crossbar does not allow access to the ignition in it's current position, I still need to re-locate the ignition but for now, I have the crossbar off.

 

IMG_3374.JPG

 

Race Tech Rear Spring (part varies on spring rate): I followed these videos for the instructions on how to do this VID1 VID2 VID3

 

What I learned: The Race Tech spring definitely only goes on one way even though in the RT instructions it makes no mention of this. You can tell because the spring will not be able to slide all the way down and rest on the collar properly. Also, in the absence of a proper spanner wrench I used a mallet and wooden dowel to turn the preload collars as needed so I did not damage them. I found the Yosh full exhaust I had on very difficult to remove at the non-muffler end of the mid-pipe. I used the same wooden dowel to tap on the bunghole to break it free and some PB Blaster for lubrication. Upon re-install, I used some anti-seize on the connections to make future work easier.

 

IMG_3375.JPG

 

Rear Sprocket (part varies on tooth count/brand): Same vid was used (VID1) from above for the process of tire removal. I found the sprocket bolts/nuts to be a real bitch to remove and ended up stripping most of them, some very badly. Definitely attempt to turn the nut, not the bolt (I had read this beforehand) although it didn't help me much.

 

What I learned: Some PB Blaster helps loosen most but I had one very stubborn bolt that would not break free. Ultimately, I hacksawed it off. I had ordered fresh nuts/bolts so I wasn't worried about damaging the original.

 

IMG_3371.JPG

 

Clarke 3.9 Tank (part# 11409) w/Yamaha Petcock (part # 5LP-24500-01-00): The install for this is technically no different that putting your old tank back on except for the safety wire that connects across the front. It slides right on the pucks as the original tank does.

 

What I learned: The metal piece on the top of the tank that slides into the plastic slot on the front of the seat was too long. It would not allow the seat to slide forward enough to align the screw holes in the rear. I took it off and used a dremel (the only cutting tool I had to do this) and cut about 1/8" off and smoothed the edges on that side which probably removed another 1/32" or 1/16". After that the seat fit perfectly. I had ordered a new fuel hose and cut a bit off to connect the carb and petcock. On the right side of the tank, the shroud doesn't align with all of the screw hold without distorting the shroud a bit. A pain but not unusable. Also, there are 2 metal hooks welded to the frame head that are there to route wiring. They are partially in the way and they need to be bent a bit so there is clearance for the tank. I read somewhere where someone had them rub holes into the tank. Ouch.

 

One overall thing I learned is to take pictures of every part of the bike you'll be working on. That way, if you aren't sure upon reassembly, you can see how it looked BEFORE you took it apart. I'm a visual person and this was helpful for me for confirmation that all was assembled the way it should be.

 

BEFORE:

IMG_3328.JPG

 

AFTER:

IMG_3363.JPG

IMG_3364.JPG

Edited by Joehio
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Yeah, I'll be adding those. I did the the OP at work while on a conference call (Zzzzzzzzzz) so I didn't have pics available to me but I wanted to start it while I had it in my head. Hopefully, my "learnings" are the key bits of info you might not find elsewhere easily (or I would've found it when I researched).

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You can install the rear spring without removing the shock too, if you want to save some time. I only mention it, because many people think it needs to be removed to install the spring.

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Yeah, thanks...I saw that but I want to remove the whole swingarm to lube it up. might as well while I'm in there.

 

Funny story...might not come across as funny in the written format and it makes me look like and idiot but oh well.

So I was finishing putting in my front springs and was cleaning up. I had purchased a tub of waterless hand cleaner a few weeks back and it had been maybe 10 years since I've used some. I grabbed the tub and headed to the sink to clean up. I opened the tub and it was a dark green paste and had a chemical smell. I was kind of expecting more of a fragrant smell. So I dipped in and got a bit. It was very viscous and hard to spread on my hands so I got a bit more. After a minute of rubbing, I noticed it wasn't cleaning at all. I looked down at the tub and it was Belray waterless grease! I grabbed the wrong damn tub (they look very similar).  :lol:  Doh! :facepalm:

 

That was fun to clean up afterwards.  :banghead:  In my defense, it was the first time I had opened either tub.

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Yeah, thanks...I saw that but I want to remove the whole swingarm to lube it up. might as well while I'm in there.

 

Funny story...might not come across as funny in the written format and it makes me look like and idiot but oh well.

So I was finishing putting in my front springs and was cleaning up. I had purchased a tub of waterless hand cleaner a few weeks back and it had been maybe 10 years since I've used some. I grabbed the tub and headed to the sink to clean up. I opened the tub and it was a dark green paste and had a chemical smell. I was kind of expecting more of a fragrant smell. So I dipped in and got a bit. It was very viscous and hard to spread on my hands so I got a bit more. After a minute of rubbing, I noticed it wasn't cleaning at all. I looked down at the tub and it was Belray waterless grease! I grabbed the wrong damn tub (they look very similar).  :lol:  Doh! :facepalm:

 

That was fun to clean up afterwards.  :banghead:  In my defense, it was the first time I had opened either tub.

 

I hope you found the hand cleaner !  :doh:

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OP updated with the remaining tasks. I'll take pictures tonight and post them up.

 

Hopefully, this helps someone! If anyone sees anything I may could've done better or forgot, let me know.

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Joe. For future work on your bike a hammer driven impact wrench/tool helps pop those pesky sprocket bolts. Works on other parts/fasteners too just be careful when using on the engine case fasteners. Case can break if impacting to hard.

 

Very good write up. Thanks for sharing! :)

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Pics added

Very nice,  i really like that clear tank,  i like the blue touches too,   nice lawn too btw. 

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Bike looks really nice. I'd like to try the pivot pegs someday. On the rear sprocket bolts, don't remove/install them by applying torque to the bolt, the heads won't last very long. Instead, use the boxed end of a wrench on the nut and tap the open end with a rubber mallet to loosen/tighten. The only torque applied to the bolt should be to prevent it from rotating while you loosen the nut. You may have to finagle the boxed end on some of the nuts by starting at an angle depending on how the spokes line up, but I've never had a bike where I couldn't get the closed end on each one. 

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What I learned: The metal piece on the top of the tank that slides into the plastic slot on the front of the seat was too long. It would not allow the seat to slide forward enough to align the screw holes in the rear. I took it off and used a dremel (the only cutting tool I had to do this) and cut about 1/8" off and smoothed the edges on that side which probably removed another 1/32" or 1/16". After that the seat fit perfectly.

Wish I thought of that last Saturday after fighting that #^%€&@! for an hour or more.

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what did you set your sag on the rear too?

I have not set it properly yet as I haven't had anyone to assist me. My wife is currently in a wheelchair due to a recent knee surgery so she's not able to do much. I'm pretty sure I have it close though.

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Very nice,  i really like that clear tank,  i like the blue touches too,   nice lawn too btw. 

Thanks...I need something blue for the rear to balance it out. I do have the blue DR-Z swingarm sticker en route so maybe that'll help.

 

The lawn you see is mostly my neighbors :)

 

Now to get her dirty!  I still have to take it for out of state inspection and get my title transferred and plate first (the plate on it is from my previous bike) :rolleyes:

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Just a mention... I noticed that most of the bolts and screws on our bikes seem a bit soft. I learned the hard way when removing my rear shock for upgrade. I was using 12 point sockets and combo wrenches. That was a mistake. The 12 point tools allow to much slop and easily rounds off the bolt heads or nuts. I have since switched to 6 point tools and have had no problems since. Hope this helps someone... :)

 

Joe I am glad you added the pics. Looks great and really sets off your report!!! :D

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Thanks, good to know about the sockets.

 

Unfortunately, a lot of the buts/bolts on bikes are soft - especially the small ones. On my Z1000, where I could I replaced a bunch of the bolts with titanium bolts from pro-bolt.

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