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Front end shake

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Ever since I got my suspension back from fcr it rides great but now I have head shake at high speeds and can't tell why. Besides a dampener that will hide the real issue. Anyway to fix this.

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Ever since I got my suspension back from fcr it rides great but now I have head shake at high speeds and can't tell why. Besides a dampener that will hide the real issue. Anyway to fix this.

speed up front rebound, how many clicks from full stiff is the rebound?

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Not entirely sure. They forgot to send me clicker setting list when I got susspension back.. So I haven't tweaked it a whole lot, but I have gone 2 clicks harder on rebound. On certain un even jumps when I land it would rebound too much too fast and and would almost crash every time on certain jumps cuz my front end would be off ground then contact un even ground and catch. The two clicks in definitely helped. It might have even helped shake a lil but if so not a ton.

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All things being equal, if your forks are higher in the clamps (more fork tube showing above the top clamp) that will lead to more head shake.  Of course, it will be easier to turn tight corners that way, so it is a trade-off.  Are your forks set within the very tight range in the manual?  Just the first place to start.  The other thing to look at is your steering column.  You want it tight, but not too tight (again, there are torque specs in the manual).  If you tighten it a little more than spec, it acts as a poor-man's-stabilizer.  Just don't over-tighten too much, because those bearings heat up during a race.  The clickers could be the problem.  You already knew that, but forks being too high would definitely cause the symptom.  Another option is to tilt your bars back a little.  The higher they are, the less leverage you have over the front.  It can make head shake feel worse than it is, because you can't control it as well.

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Good info dragon, ya honestly that's the biggest change I've done since getting susspension back was lowering forks to help with shake. Before I sent it out I ran it on the seconds tallest line. Now I go flush with fork basically and it helped a lot. But like I was saying it just weirds me out since it was fine before and now it's an issue at speed.

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Good info dragon, ya honestly that's the biggest change I've done since getting susspension back was lowering forks to help with shake. Before I sent it out I ran it on the seconds tallest line. Now I go flush with fork basically and it helped a lot. But like I was saying it just weirds me out since it was fine before and now it's an issue at speed.

how many clicks out is your front rebound?

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Good info dragon, ya honestly that's the biggest change I've done since getting susspension back was lowering forks to help with shake. Before I sent it out I ran it on the seconds tallest line. Now I go flush with fork basically and it helped a lot. But like I was saying it just weirds me out since it was fine before and now it's an issue at speed.

 

Cool, just be careful with the upper and lower limits.  If you go flush with the tube on the upper clamp, you may be causing more problems.  Interesting how a few MM can make such a difference.  The other thing to check is the steering stem.  Too loose and your front end will shake like crazy.  Too tight and as the bearing heats up it will be hard to turn.  At this point it would be a good idea to make sure everything is tight.  If you feel perceptible play at the steering stem while the bike is on a stand (just try to push and pull the front wheel) then you found your problem.  

 

Also follow the procedure for mounting the front wheel.  Basically torque the right axle clamps to 15 ft-lb, then torque the axle nut to 58 ft-lb, then torque the left clamp bolts to 15, then relax the right clamp bolts and pump the forks up and down at least 5 times.  We run the wheel up against a piece of 4X4 to help with the compression.  Then torque the right clamp bolts to 15 again.  The reason for doing this is to make sure the forks slide freely up and down with no binding.  Do not use the brake to assist in the pumping of the forks.

 

Another consideration is the bars.  If they are rotated too far forward, it will give you less leverage over the front wheel, which may seem like more perceptible shake.  Of course, make sure the bearings in the front wheel are turning smoothly with your fingers while you have the thing off your bike.

 

I can't think of anything else.  Get all that done and set your clickers to factory spec, then adjust as necessary.  Good luck!

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