Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  

Moving to Colorado

Recommended Posts

My wife and I are moving to Pagosa Springs CO. The riding in the San Juan National forest should be awesome.I already have a map. County gravel roads should be interesting too.

 

I always wanted to ride and maybe hunt in CO, now I can ride there every day.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My wife and I are moving to Pagosa Springs CO. The riding in the San Juan National forest should be awesome.I already have a map. County gravel roads should be interesting too.

 

I always wanted to ride and maybe hunt in CO, now I can ride there every day.

You're gonna need to jet your bikes when you get there because............. you won't be in Kansas anymore, Dorothy.

 

Is Pagosa Springs pretty high up there?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The fishing sucks. And at least where I live everyone thinks they are going to sign a contract out of the 250b class they've been in for five years, so good luck finding good riding buddies.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You're gonna need to jet your bikes when you get there because............. you won't be in Kansas anymore, Dorothy.

 

Is Pagosa Springs pretty high up there?

Haven't you herd, everyone is HIGH in colorado!
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Haven't you herd, everyone is HIGH in colorado!

Scruff McGruff told me to stay away from you.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Scruff McGruff told me to stay away from you.

ImageUploadedByThumper Talk1401827759.216068.jpg

See the teeth on the bucket? The fourth one from the left is for you

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Welcome! Colorado has a lot of great riding areas. Note you'll need to obtain an OHV permit to ride in the public parks. At $25.00/year it's a fanatstic value.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Welcome! Colorado has a lot of great riding areas. Note you'll need to obtain an OHV permit to ride in the public parks. At $25.00/year it's a fanatstic value.

 

Are there any requirements for the bike?  I am interviewing for a position in Denver that looks promising and I am trying to get as much info on riding there as possible.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Are there any requirements for the bike? I am interviewing for a position in Denver that looks promising and I am trying to get as much info on riding there as possible.

Just a permit and a spark arrester.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Are there any requirements for the bike?  I am interviewing for a position in Denver that looks promising and I am trying to get as much info on riding there as possible.

You'll need an OHV permit to ride on forest service roads even if it's a plated bike.  That's what they told me at Parks And Wildlife where I got it. This is the first year I got the OHV sticker, I had been told plated bikes didn't need em.  And the bike needs a spark arrestor.  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You're mean!!!  Someone get poor Honda_Power out of there RIGHT NOW!!!

 

IMG_9810.jpg

That kid's got fake Addidas on......... 4 stripes instead of 3.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That kid's got fake Addidas on......... 4 stripes instead of 3.

They're not Adidas, they are kids shoes slick!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You'll need an OHV permit to ride on forest service roads even if it's a plated bike.  That's what they told me at Parks And Wildlife where I got it. This is the first year I got the OHV sticker, I had been told plated bikes didn't need em.  And the bike needs a spark arrestor.  

 

Still a lot of dispute about this.  Plated Jeeps run forest service roads (and 4 wheel drive trails) without a special OHV permit - why should plated bikes need something special to do the same?  I think the 'right' answer is that if you plan to ride trails that only accomodate ATVs and motorcycles you will need the OHV permit.

 

 

Slomojo...to educate you a bit more.  To ride in national forests in Colorado you will need the $25/yr OHV permit.  Now, with the OHV permit, you can go on most forest service roads and any trails that allow motorized vehicles and specifically show the motorcycle on them.  The only requirement is a spark arrestor.  Where is gets sticky is that counties and municipalities that maintain some of the forest service roads have the ability to dictate that only plated vehicles can drive them and no ATVs or Motorcycles with only the OHV permit are allowed.  So what this means is that you sometimes have to go quite a ways up the forest service roads before there is a parking area to unload and ride OHVs from that point.  Some areas have plenty of riding just for OHV and you will never need to go on a road which requires a plate....but more and more as civilization creeps in .....portions of the forest service roads become off limits to OHVs without plates.

 

So for some of us, the answer in Colorado is to 'convert' the dirt bike from offroad vehicle to on-road through a pretty easy conversion process (headlight, taillight, brake light, mirror, horn DOT tires are required for initial inspection).  You will pay more for annual licensing and registration (which requires insurance) and maybe pay $25 OHV sticker each year......but you can go anywhere (trail, road, highway, etc) unless it is wilderness area or a trail that is only for horses/hikers.  Makes for much greater convenience in places like in the San Juans.  We can loop from Ouray to Telluride to Silverton to Lake City, etc without worrying about a thing and not sweating that the last couple miles into town are where no OHVs are allowed.  Last Summer we stayed in Ouray and rode right from the place in town where we stayed.  The Summer before we did the same thing in Crested Butte.  No trailering all your stuff to the OHV designated trailhead.  In fact, I really enjoyed riding through Telluride watching all the rich people give you looks like you are not supposed to be there.  Of course they moved from the Left or Right coast or some big city and want to come here and tell us how to run the place and trying to shut out all the long time native Coloradoans from enjoying what we have done for a lifetime....and seem to be disappointed they can't stop our fun.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Talking about dirt bike requirements (non-plated)...no mention of exhaust sound limit!? Because there are limits and they vary by place to place. IIRC, 95 dbs is the standard. In this respect, a lot of dirt bikers are not much better than the hog riders I see hurting ears regularly. At least on the highway I expect to be bombarded with noises...in forested riding areas a loud pipe is even more annoying. Don't get me wrong, as a man I love the sound of exhaust...but most other people don't and there's no way around that other than having quieter pipes.

Jeeps and 4x4s on OHV trails are SUPPOSE to be getting hassled by the man now for not having OHV tags (as of the last 2 years). Is this actually happening? I have no idea, I don't keep up with that crowd. But the man is trying to keep enforcement consistent and that means any vehicle on any OHV trail in CO "should" have an OHV tag regardless of plate or no plate or however many wheels. I don't like the tags in principle but then again I don't like income tax either...but in all reality it's easier to get the OHV tag and not be hassled by some low-level enforcement peon (just like how I pay taxes solely to avoid the IRS). Having the Search and Rescue benefits of the tag are very good peace of mind as well. All that being said, a license plate is truly invaluable. You can sell your bike for an extra $300-500 on CL just for having a plate and title...and that premium will only ever increase.
 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

RampartStalker....yep good point about the sound restrictions.  Here is the Colorado OHV webpage that gives more information including the sound law:

 

http://cpw.state.co.us/thingstodo/Pages/OHVs.aspx

 

 

it is 96 dB for anything manufactured after 1/1/98 and 98 dB for anything before that. 

 

I have yet to encounter anyone measuring for sound or for that matter checking for a spark arrestor, but I suppose it could happen if a Forest Service Ranger stopped you on the trail.  Spark arrestor is an easy check for them.  Sound....thats gonna be tough to determine without proper testing equipment.  My guess is they would warn you and say they 'think' it sounds to loud and you should ensure it is 96dB and below.

 

My approach is I buy the OHV sticker and avoid the hassle and most of these funds go to trailbuilding projects, etc that seem worth the money and will pay for search and rescue.  The one I dont feel my money is well spent is the annual vehicle registration.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:

Sign in to follow this  

×