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Torque wrenches

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Ok.. I need to buy a torque wrench to do all of my work on my CR250R.. What's cheap that will work well? I'm confused about in/pounds and Foot/ pounds? Are both used on dirtbikes? Are those two seperate wrenches,.. Ect

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Harbor Freight sells pretty good tools for a cheap price!  Lifetime warranty too, I believe.

Edited by Honda_Power
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Ok.. I need to buy a torque wrench to do all of my work on my CR250R.. What's cheap that will work well? I'm confused about in/pounds and Foot/ pounds? Are both used on dirtbikes? Are those two seperate wrenches,.. Ect

Yes.

I trust snap on torque wrenches.

Cheap will cost you more in the long term.

Matco, Mac, Cornwell also are great. I just had bought the best.

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Cheap and quality usually dont go together when buying tools. Proto , armstrong , craftsman, mac, snapon are all good if you take care of them. I would stay away from used unless you get it calibrated . I have seen more damage done with a torque wrench than without. You should try to stay with in the middle of the range to maintain accuracy so you will need a few different wrenches. 12 inch pounds =1 foot pound so those would be you lower range like like 180 inch pounds or 15 ftlbs and less

Edited by mec500
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Yeah I know snap ons pritty much the best.. Do I use foot pounds or inch pound wrench on a Dirtbike? Or do they read both?

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again tt pulls through :D

I am ready to leave work right know and go!!!

and take off monday :)

is there a sound check?

how about spark arrester?

What's the manual say for torque specs?

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smaller torques are measured in inch-lbs. larger torques are measured in ft-lbs. there are 12 in-lbs per 1 ft-lb.

 

i prefer to just use the metric version...newton meters (nm). in general, the metric system kicks our system's ass, but...

 

you usually do need two torque wrenches because few can be accurate for both small and large torque specs (i.e., all the way from a few inch lbs up through 100+ ft lbs.) dirt bike have some fasteners that require small torques and some that require large torques.

 

i have a couple craftsman clicker-types...one small, in-lb one and one larger, ft-lb one (both also have a nm scale...which is what i actually use). i've had them for about 10 years and recently checked them against a machinist friend's high-end torque wrenches. they're both still accurate after all these years.

Edited by LittleRedToyota
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I have inexpensive Craftsman for home and regulary calibrated Snap-On for work. The cheap ones click at the same setting the expensive ones do.

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I understand the advice about "you get what you pay for" and in most cases with tools, that is true.  I still return rare broken Craftsman stuff for refurbished or new at Sears.

 

As for the Harbor Freight 1/4 inch and 3/8 inch drive torque wrenches, one for inch pounds (used for engine cover and cam cap bolts, for example)  and one for foot pounds (used for linkages and frame bolts) I have yet to encounter a problem of any kind.  I am also aware that, no matter what torque wrench you invest in, calibration is necessary to ensure as close to perfect as possible.  In comparing my Harbor Freight to my Craftsman, I get identical break points regardless of which one I use first.  

 

The key to torque wrench maintenance is to back them off after use.  The key to using them is to not depend on them at the extremes, and to know what they feel like when they break, and to use common sense if it seems like you are going over torque.  For cam cap bolts, my technique is to torque them all in sequence to about 75% before going to 100%.  For the oil drain plug, I always go 1 foot pound lighter anyway.

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I have a needle style torque wrench that works quite well. Im sure its not extremely accurate but its plenty good for most things!

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Ok well.. I'm not rich so I am going to probley have to go with the harbor freight torque wrenches.. Plus it's right down the street:)

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harbor freight torque wrenches might be good out of the box but the dont last long before they get out of wack ive broken small bolts because they didnt click untill it was too late. you can convert inch lbs to foot lbs and visa versa. now that i work as a mechanic i own snap on torque wrenches but there damn expensive. we also have a torque checker at work so thats nice to have.

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harbor freight torque wrenches might be good out of the box but the dont last long before they get out of wack ive broken small bolts because they didnt click untill it was too late. you can convert inch lbs to foot lbs and visa versa. now that i work as a mechanic i own snap on torque wrenches but there damn expensive. we also have a torque checker at work so thats nice to have.

How many quarts of blinker fluid do I need for my honda cr125? 

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I have a brownline digital it measures in. ft. and nm . set it by pushing the up or down arrows and pull til' it beeps. Even my 15 yr. old son can use it.  :lol:  Trusting him with a 12k dollar engine build . 

IMG_1499.JPG

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Ok well.. I'm not rich so I am going to probley have to go with the harbor freight torque wrenches.. Plus it's right down the street:)

 

I have a Home Depot right down the street, and that is like heaven.  Having a Harbor Freight within a couple minutes would be even better!  I have no reason to doubt that people had problems with the Pittsburgh wrenches (Harbor Freight), and no reason to believe my extremely positive experience is representative of every wrench sold, but the main problem with torque wrenches is the user, no matter which one is being used.  This is particularly true when the break point is set below the lowest degree marked on the wrench, assuming the gradients are continuous, and it is also true when turning too fast, in which case it is easy to blow by the break.

 

This article is pretty interesting.  I didn't even know about the digital thing until this thread came up.  Gotta get one!  http://www.carcraft.com/techarticles/ccrp_1304_torque_wrench_testing/  I'm not rich, either, but I buy mostly good stuff.  If I thought I could do better than the Pittsburgh for accuracy without spending a sick amount of money for something that is just as likely to fail, I would buy it.  Follow the instructions.  Test your skills on a bicycle first to get a feel for the wrench, then use it until you either upgrade (if you feel you must) or until you just buy another one just like it.  Either way, the safest way to not strip a critical small bolt is to torque in increments, regardless of the wrench.  Good for you for investing in one.  Much better than not using one at all.

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How many quarts of blinker fluid do I need for my honda cr125? 

There's no such thing as blinker fluid, moron. Have some pie.

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I have a needle style torque wrench that works quite well. Im sure its not extremely accurate but its plenty good for most things!

Actually, they are probably the most accurate, within the ability to read the scale accurately. They don't go out of adjustment (unless you bend the needle). I have 4 torque wrenches, the smallest is needle style, 0-60 inch/pounds (0-5 foot/pounds).

Mike

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It's good to have a couple different sizes since there are so many different torque specs range on a bike. I'm assuming you'll use them on your car/truck as well so it would be worth it. I use a craftsman 1/2 inch drive that does up to 150 ft lbs, a 3/8 inch drive snap on that has NM and inch lbs and I recently bought a 1/4 in husky from Home Depot that I wanted for engine work. I'm not really sold on the 1/4 in one but I use the 3/8 the most and the 1/2 in gets used a lot too for rear axles and lug nuts on cars. If you can only get one for now I'd go with the 3/8 in drive and try to get one that will cover most of the torque range that you need.

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I have both a Craftsman and Harbor Freight torque wrenches. Both work just fine. I have plenty of tools from both places and some Snap-on goods too. If I was making a living with my tools I would fork over the cash for Snap On or Mac, but for the home mechanic, HF or Craftsman will work for me.

 

Just like Dragon said....test it out on a bicycle to get a feel for it. I thought I was the only one that did that! :lol:

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I know it's been stated before, but it's important to emphasize: even the best torque wrenches are only accurate in the middle 70% of their range. Places that use surveyed and guaranteed specifications for assemblies require that a torque wrench be used between the bottom and top 15% of the scale.

So what I'm saying is that a wrench that torques from 50 to 150 ft. lbs. is only accurate between 65 and 135.

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