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2012 250 kxf: need buying advice

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Just sold my 2013 sxf 250 and now I'm thinking of buying a 2012 kxf 250. Needed some advice. I have horrible memories of my 2008 crf250, kicking the daylights praying it would start, it was a damn nightmare. I'm so used to the electric start on the ktm and don't want the same crf nightmares. I'm a novice to slow intermediate at best.

So how is the kx to kick  start, hot and cold?

I'm a big dude; 240-250 lbs. On the racetech site I checked the front fork spring is fine for my weight but rear shock spring is .4-.5 lower for me. Doesn't seem right now does it? Or were the kxfs so overly sprung up front? Can I get a new rear spring and change it myself or do I need to do something special to the shock to get it to match the front? I'm in India so don't have access to specialised suspension tuners.

I'll be fine with the weak brake as I'm not that fast anyway. How is it geared for very tight tracks. I could barely get to 3rd on my ktm at our local track, should I gear it down?

Anything else I need to watch out for on the kx? I have heard about heavy clutch springs, chain slider and sliding piece, anything else?

And finally, how is the bike? All reviews I've read are superb but what about long term users? My 9 yr old boy rides a kx65 with me at the track so I've got a thing to go green :-)

Edit: Oh the kxf I'm looking at has got a pro circuit can and something called a bomb

Edited by IndianFighter

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They start right up every time with the right technique.  As for the shock spring, might want to just set the race sag and see if you have enough static sag.  If you are in the range, you are fine.  Lots of resources on line.  You can set the front fork sag easily as well.  As you pointed out, hard to believe you would need to go lower.  

 

The brakes aren't weak, but they can be better with aggressive pads and an oversized front rotor.  Heavy duty clutch springs are inexpensive, chain slider replacements aren't bad, either.  It's a great bike.  Enjoy.  

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They start right up every time with the right technique.  As for the shock spring, might want to just set the race sag and see if you have enough static sag.  If you are in the range, you are fine.  Lots of resources on line.  You can set the front fork sag easily as well.  As you pointed out, hard to believe you would need to go lower.  

 

The brakes aren't weak, but they can be better with aggressive pads and an oversized front rotor.  Heavy duty clutch springs are inexpensive, chain slider replacements aren't bad, either.  It's a great bike.  Enjoy.  

What's the right technique? A half kick to get to TDC and then a full kick? Even when hot or after a stall/crash. Is it like the carb'd models where you have to play around with the choke, kick 10 times with throttle full open after a crash or have things changed on the FI bikes where you just kick and go after a crash?

Thanks for your help.

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As long as the valves are in spec the bike will start hot or cold within 3 kicks, use the cold start knob when cold.  

 

My 2012 has 128 hours now and ive just bought a 3rd chain slider ( I should have gone TM Design from day one as they should last much longer ) the chain guide i replaced with TM Design and its still perfect.

 

The gearing i find to work very well standard.

 

Im still on the oem clutch and springs, I may be looking to change those soon but no slipping as yet.

 

I have no issues with the brakes.    

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so shimming out of specs valve should solve the out of spec probs right? On my 2008 crf I would shim it and in a few hours they would be out of spec again. Something to do with the head material being soft and having to send the head to a machine shop. No such problem here right?

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My inlet valves i replaced at 75 hours with OEM valves and now at 130 hours havent moved.

 

You can shim them a couple times before replacing.  

 

You can allways change the inlets to Kibblewhite stainless valves which last longer than the OEM titanium valves. 

 

Make sure you keep the air filter clean and oiled, and dont ride the bike on the limiter, then your valves will last longer.   

 

The bike starts easy if it falls over as it doesnt have a carburettor to flood.  

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What's the right technique? A half kick to get to TDC and then a full kick? Even when hot or after a stall/crash. Is it like the carb'd models where you have to play around with the choke, kick 10 times with throttle full open after a crash or have things changed on the FI bikes where you just kick and go after a crash?

Thanks for your help.

 

The right technique for us is 1:  Pull out the fast idle knob (it's the choke-like thing)  2.  Give the bike two or three slower steady kicks to charge the system (this gets the fuel pump going).  3.  After the initial kicks, give it a harder steady kick.  It should fire right up.

 

If the bike is warm, you don't need the fast idle knob pulled out.  If it just stalled and you are doing a restart, if you get the kicker to engage at the top and give it a solid kick, it should start right up.  If it sits for any length of time, you still need to charge the system.

 

Kicking it like a 2T will cause you to get tired and the bike not to start.  In our case it caused me to call the dealer to ask what was up with this damn bike!  He laughed at me, told me the "trick" and the bike fired instantly.

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I find that if valves are adjusted within spec and the fuel screw is set right, they start no problem.

 

D'oh, just realized this is a FI bike, nevermind :)

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Sorry, off topic but might as well ask this here. Changing the inlets involves machining to the head?

 

Some people cut the seats every time they put in new valves others dont, that is not bike specific, all 4 strokes are the same.

 

I was disappointed that my inlets only lasted 75 hours on the 250 as my KX450 did over 200 hours before i needed new inlet valves.     

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Some people cut the seats every time they put in new valves others dont, that is not bike specific, all 4 strokes are the same.

 

I was disappointed that my inlets only lasted 75 hours on the 250 as my KX450 did over 200 hours before i needed new inlet valves.     

 

I would be disappointed with 75 hours, too.  Here is another plug for SS valves! especially for weekend warriors.  Those things are tanks.  Just need heavier springs.  Cutting seats as you say is "optional" but it is the best way to ensure longer valve life without installing alloy seats.  

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Sorry, off topic but might as well ask this here. Changing the inlets involves machining to the head?

 

If you mean cutting the seats, yes.  If you mean lapping the valves, no.  Not even with SS valves.  Lapping has the potential to grind off the very thin layer of super-hard material that coats Ti valves and even SS valves.

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