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2001 yz 125 front brake problems?

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my brake feels soft and spongy when I use it. i looked at the resovoir (on the handlebars) and it was full, but i noticed when i squeeze the brake a air bubble surfaces everytime. any suggestions it would be greatly appreciated.

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You have air in your lines. Sometimes you can pump it out just by pumping the lever with the cover off but you usually have to bleed your lines. There are several methods of doing this just do a search on bleeding brakes.

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my brake feels soft and spongy when I use it. i looked at the resovoir (on the handlebars) and it was full, but i noticed when i squeeze the brake a air bubble surfaces everytime. any suggestions it would be greatly appreciated.

Bleed your line, make sure to use DOT 4 or what ever specific your bike needs.  Don't just add any brake fluid you happen to have on hand.  Check your manual or get on the net and find out the specific.  Check out You Tube for instructional videos.  You definitely don't want air in your system.  Good luck. :devil:

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Speed bubbles from riding so fast

 

Might be able to get them out by pushing your pads in a little.then pump up, then push in. try it a few times. I know it feels like cheating. But im a cheater.

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Replacing brake fluid is a regular maintenance item. 

 

Brake fluid is strongly hygrospic, meaning it sucks moisture right out of the air. The moisture then boils in the fluid when you get the brakes hot, creating vapor pockets that make the brakes spongy. Regular bleeding is the only way to prevent this. Here in high-humidity Florida, I replace mine 3-4 times a year.

 

This is my preferred method.

 

Take the top off the reservoir, and suck all the fluid out with a syringe. 
 
Suction all the fluid out of the reservoir with a syringe.
 
Tap the brake line with a tool, starting at the bottom and working your way up to the top to loosen any stuck air bubbles. 
 
Grasp the rotor on both sides of the caliper with your hands, and put your thumbs against the caliper. Slowly press the caliper towards the rotor to depress the piston back into the caliper. Slowly, or you will take a brake fluid shower!
 
Keep pressing until the piston bottoms out.
 
Suction the rest of the fluid out of the reservoir, refill with new fluid, and pump up the brakes, being careful to keep enough fluid in the reservoir that you don't run out and get more air into the lines. Then go through normal bleeding procedures to replace the remaining old fluid in the caliper and line.
Edited by Chokey

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Brake fluid tends to be a highly neglected thing on lots of bikes out there.  Bleeding should be done often as Chokey says.

 

Check out the brake fluid on my son's cr when I first acquired it before and after bleeding (enough to displace old with new).

 

Bleeding brakes/changing fluid can have a dramatic effect on braking feel/performance:

 

P4180457_zpsb39111f7.jpg

 

P4180465_zps8cea6eec.jpg

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