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Common Brand Myths?

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So I have came up with some common brand myths for beginners like my self, trying to find which dirt bike/ dirt bike brand is the best first buy.

 

I heard that...

 

- Honda's are extremely reliable and bulletproof, and tend to be fairly priced

 

- Yamaha's break fairly easily, and tend to be fairly priced

 

- Kawasaki's are  over priced, and not a smart look for one with a cheap budget

 

Suzuki's are good racing bikes, but hard to find a good trial bike, price can range from high to low

 

This is the experience I have had with searching for my first dirt bike, and opinions from people I have talked to.

 

What's your opinion on the best first bike (mainly used for trial riding -- rough -- and around the house) with a budget of $1,100 and under.  Obviously not new.

 

 

 

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I know I didn't include some brands like KTM, but I felt that KTM is mainly a racing brand?  -- I didn't bother with posting any brands like Baja etc.

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So I have came up with some common brand myths for beginners like my self, trying to find which dirt bike/ dirt bike brand is the best first buy.

 

I heard that...

 

- Honda's are extremely reliable and bulletproof, and tend to be fairly priced

 

- Yamaha's break fairly easily, and tend to be fairly priced

 

- Kawasaki's are  over priced, and not a smart look for one with a cheap budget

 

Suzuki's are good racing bikes, but hard to find a good trial bike, price can range from high to low

 

This is the experience I have had with searching for my first dirt bike, and opinions from people I have talked to.

 

What's your opinion on the best first bike (mainly used for trial riding -- rough -- and around the house) with a budget of $1,100 and under.  Obviously not new.

Myths are Myths = (Usually fictional)    Facts are Facts = (Usually proven or verified knowledge) ,  you can look through the TT forums and find the facts for yourself, (and the myths if you like), Nick.

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Myths are Myths = (Usually fictional)    Facts are Facts = (Usually proven or verified knowledge) ,  you can look through the TT forums and find the facts for yourself, (and the myths if you like), Nick.

What bike would you suggest I look at, mainly for trail riding (narrow).  And a budget of $1,100 no higher.

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What bike would you suggest I look at, mainly for trail riding (narrow).  And a budget of $1,100 no higher.

A Honda XR 250/400 or a trail bike in your budget imo,    Motocross bikes with your budget usually end badly, i.e- maintenance can cost quite a lot on mx bikes, but others on here will tell you differently.         Opinions are like belly buttons, everybody has one..       There is no be all end all answer to give, just gotta make a decision yourself, good luck, Nick.

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Depends what you're riding, MX or Enduro. Or a mix of both.

 

I would not say a Yamaha breaks easily, if anything I would say they are the most reliable.

I rode with a group of guys back in South Africa for many years and we rode some crazy technical trails and only had Yamahas for that reason.

YZ250 2T, WR200 2T, WR250 2T, YZ250F 4T, WR250 4T and the occasional WR450 4T, and YZ450F 4T (for a laugh).

The CRF's etc. did not hold up too well and we steered clear of them.

The KTM's were great but the price of KTM spares in SA was frightening to say the least, but thats changed now.

 

I wouldn't say KTM is purely a race bike, the European machines are incredible these days.

I'm a fan of them, but I don't think they are up there with Yamaha in terms of reliability.

 

But, opinions are like noses...everyone has one.

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So I have came up with some common brand myths for beginners like my self, trying to find which dirt bike/ dirt bike brand is the best first buy.

 

I heard that...

 

- Honda's are extremely reliable and bulletproof, and tend to be fairly priced

 

- Yamaha's break fairly easily, and tend to be fairly priced

 

- Kawasaki's are  over priced, and not a smart look for one with a cheap budget

 

Suzuki's are good racing bikes, but hard to find a good trial bike, price can range from high to low

 

This is the experience I have had with searching for my first dirt bike, and opinions from people I have talked to.

 

What's your opinion on the best first bike (mainly used for trial riding -- rough -- and around the house) with a budget of $1,100 and under.  Obviously not new.

 

You are correct, those are all myths. Pick the bike you like and ride.

 

Mike

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The above 'myths' are just about the opposite of reality.

 

To the OP, no one can recommend you a bike without knowing your size, age, experience, terrain, etc.

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Given the fact that your 16, seem to have little to no experience in this realm, and your low budget, I'd say a CRF230F/TTR230 fits here. I paid $1200 for a really nice one a few years back. These bikes are just about indestructible (magic button too)

 

Really, I recommend this bike to any young beginner.

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For off, thanks for the quick replies, I have yet to find a site so responsive with good feedback until I came here.

 

Secondly, I can give some more info regarding what bike I should look at.

 

I'm 5'9 - 140lbs.  Never have even operated a dirt bike before.  Have rode some quads as a kid, but a while ago.  Have the basic understanding on how to shift (from car and videos teaching how to on a dirt bike).  

 

Terrain is mostly going to consist of your basic New England woods. 

 

I have no problem picking up some more hours at work this month to increase my low budget, if that will open my options of finding a bike.  

 

Thanks

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  ANSWER ALL THOSE QUESTIONS HONESTLY
  1. Money. Can you afford what you want? If you have 500 bucks to spend, don't chase around like a Loony Tune trying to buy a brand-new 125 whatever. Use your head and buy the cleanest and best-conditioned bike you can buy for the money.

    3s.jpg

    A good solid older bike is a YZ 400 or 465. Stay away from the 490. There are no magic deals in the real world, and you are not going to find some chump who'll give you a perfect bike for low bucks, If you're on a budget, buy a bike you won't have to spend a lot on. And do not buy a bike that has expensive parts.

     

  2. If you have to finance a bike, your choice will be limited by several things. Many dealers will not be able to finance a bike unless it can be licensed. This means a street-legal, dual-purpose bike if you plan to venture off-road. Many riders buy such a bike, then strip it down a bit, add real knobby tires and go have a lot of fun riding.

    If you find yourself in such a position, then the bike you choose should be more dirt than street oriented. If you have to buy a street-legal bike and want to ride it in the dirt, think about bikes in the 250cc range. No matter what anyone tells you, the big 500 and 600 cc street-legal trail hikes are really piles off-road. Some are better than others, but any decent 250 will run circles around one of these lard buckets when the trail is get the least bit gnarly.

     

  3. 4s.jpg

    Just about any used RM 250 is a viable candidate. Skill. Do you have any? Or are you just getting into the riding sport? If you re new, get a mellow bike and you'll probably learnt better riding skills in direct proportion to the number of hours you spend in the saddle.

    Get a bike that's way too much or your skills, and you'll spend most of the time in an advanced state of terror, or picking your new bike up off the ground. A bike that's easy to ride will encourage you to try things and to explore the outer edges of your expanding skills.

     

  4. Types of riding. If you're genuinely going to race motocross, then by all means, get a MX bike. If you plan to mostly trail ride, then get a fun, trail bike. The XRs and such are good for this.

    If you want to ride some enduros or hare scrambles, then an enduro bike is the direction to go. They also make excellent trail/play bikes and can be successfully raced in desert arid cross-country in relatively stock trim.

     

  5. 5s.jpg

    Unless the bike is well maintained, stay away from the older CR 250s. Can you handle wrenches? Are you good with tools? If not, consider a simple bike with very little in the way of trickery. An air-cooled two-stroke with no wild exhaust gimmicks is very easy to work on. A liquid-cooled four-stroke single is a nightmare when it comes to a basic top-end rebuild.

     

  6. If you live close to a savvy Yamaha dealer who's into dirt hikes, you're a fool not to take your business to this man. However, if you live close to a Honda shop that's bug-nuts over Gold Wings and has no dirt bikes on the floor, look elsewhere.

     

  7. Make sure that the dealer you buy your bike from is a heavy dirt bike shop. Some Kawasaki dealers, for instance, could care less about KXs and want to sell you bright new Ninjas that'll do the quarter in ten flat. Other KX dealers are proud to be Team Green boosters and will have all the inside tricks on how to make the best KXs in town. Investigate.

     

  8. Are you 14 years old and growing like corn stalks in a bucket of steroids? If you buy a mini, will you be too tall for it in six months? Only you can answer this. It's better to buy a bike that's a little bit too big for you than one that's a little too small if you're in the growing years.

     

  9. 7s.jpg

    The CR 500 is good choice for a big two stroke. If you weigh 225 pounds and are six feet five inches tall, forget about 125s. Think large-sized 250s and mellow big bikes. The bike should fit you. One good rule of thumb is this: If you cant start the bike easily, don't buy it.

     

  10. Are you strong enough to ride a 500 all day long? Are your reflexes fast enough to deal with an explosive 250 racer? Can you take the pounding a big four-stroke will deliver over bad whoops?

    If you're not real strong, you must consider lightweight and easy-to-handle bikes. Big boys will want big toys. Again, one of he best gauges of whether a bike is too much for you or not is the acid nest: Can you start the bike easily? If you can't, look elsewhere.

 TRANSLATION

Bottom line time. If you're on a budget, think mellow. middleweight, used enduro bikes. Just buy the best one you call find in your price range and go out and have some fun. Kawasaki 200s are perhaps some of the best buys and most underrated bikes in this group. They are also absurdly easy to work on, and parts are cheap.

Honda XRs also fall into this category, as do DR, and TT bikes in the 250 class. Stay away from the big bikes in this range unless you are a big, strong fellow with a strong leg.

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for  your height, budget and desire to ride trails...look for a '08 and older CRF150F.  Should be able to find a used one in  near perfect condition for less than $1500.

 

Buy well and turn it for another bike when  you are ready to move up to something with better performance/suspension/braking. 

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for  your height, budget and desire to ride trails...look for a '08 and older CRF150F.  Should be able to find a used one in  near perfect condition for less than $1500.

 

Buy well and turn it for another bike when  you are ready to move up to something with better performance/suspension/braking. 

Interesting you say that, because my buddy recommended the 

crf100f but I looked at the crf150f and felt that would be better fit, however the 100f was cheaper. 

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230F....you'll quickly outgrow the 100F and 150F, and it will leave you wanting more.

Do not be scared by the 230's engine size. Although close in CC's, its not close in performance to a 250F. It will provide a great platform to learn on, while also giving you room to grow. Also, they're right in your budget. Look for a 2003-2004 model. This bike will fit you perfectly.

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230F....you'll quickly outgrow the 100F and 150F, and it will leave you wanting more.

Do not be scared by the 230's engine size. Although close in CC's, its not close in performance to a 250F. It will provide a great platform to learn on, while also giving you room to grow. Also, they're right in your budget. Look for a 2003-2004 model. This bike will fit you perfectly.

+1

I've always tried to convince people to stay away from the 150 and 230F since they are lacking in nearly every area of performance, although for your situation it seems like a good choice. I will say they seem to hold their value and are excellent starter bikes, go for the 230, it will do a little more than the 150, a decent amount of tourque and almost no top end power.

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At 5' 9'', you are too tall for anything but full size bikes. North East woods are slimy rooted and just nasty (i'm in PA, so...), and an old heavy 4 stroke would not do you much good. I would probably find a nice 99' YZ125, and work really really hard to keep it in good shape. No bling, just good tires and learing basic engine maintenance and the good ol' "take apart, grease, assemble" deal.

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At 5' 9'', you are too tall for anything but full size bikes. North East woods are slimy rooted and just nasty (i'm in PA, so...), and an old heavy 4 stroke would not do you much good. I would probably find a nice 99' YZ125, and work really really hard to keep it in good shape. No bling, just good tires and learing basic engine maintenance and the good ol' "take apart, grease, assemble" deal.

 

I disagree. I'm 6'-0", 165lbs and the 230F suited me just fine. 

 

A beginner in every since of the word, does not need a bike that requires them to be on the pipe in order to move. I think a 125 2T would be great if he were wanting to get into MX, but not for trail riding. Just my .02

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