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Chain Advice 520MXV

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Hi - I have a stock CRF250X 2012. I'm looking to clean the chain and have read a number of posts about cleaners, oils, etc.

The stock chain is a DID 520MXV, which I believe is a T-ring chain. Am I going to have any issues cleaning it with kerosene?

How do you guys dispose of used kerosene?

 

I'd like to remove the chain to clean it and the bike - I notice the chain doesn't have a master link. I assume I'm going to have to push one out and add a master?

Any recommendation as to the best way to do this?

 

Thanks guys

 

 

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I would use a brush or actual chain cleaner, not kerosene so the seals dont get damaged.

You wont find a matching clip style master link for that specific chain only the rivet style link, so unfortunately its not very quick or easy to remove the chain.

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I know many use Kerosene or #2 diesel,

 

Personally I never clean my chains with anything other then water.   I hose them off, dry them, and then lube.

 

Jim.

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I know many use Kerosene or #2 diesel,

 

Personally I never clean my chains with anything other then water.   I hose them off, dry them, and then lube.

 

Jim.

 

+1

 

Kerosine and #2 Diesel are petroleum distillates and won't harm the rings. Kerosine use to be the same as #1 Diesel but modern Diesel fuel has requirements that now make it different than Kerosine. Many use WD-40 to clean/lube ring chains.

 

Like Jim I only use water to clean my ring chains, and then apply Dupont Dry Film Teflon lube (use to be called Dupont Chain Lube) to displace water and lube the rings. A dry chain doesn't attract dirt that can wear sprockets. I use the DID VT2 chains (narrow) on all of my bikes, the first one six years ago and the current owner is still on the original chain and sprockets. Of course YMMV but I'm impressed with the longevity of ring chains and the long sprocket life of running dry film lubes, so far the cheapest longest lasting chain/sprocket combo.

 

Master links seem to be  unique to each brand/model of chain so be careful when buying a clip master link.  Personally I will only run a chain that has a clip master, no press master links for two reasons:

Over the years of trail riding I've had to break many chains to clear trapped debris.

Press tools are heavy to carry.

 

The side plate for clip master links on ring chains are a very tight fit but Motion Pro makes a light weight mini  chain press for trail use ($11), or carefully use a small pair of vise grips.

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Grunge brush and maxima clean up are excellent tools for cleaning a chain. Have soaked a chain for a week in diesel and then scrubbed with grunge brush. The maxima product works better and you don't hafta dispose of it.

Bonus event is when you conclude and simply rinse off the maxima product to witness one shiny clean chain.

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Since most of the riding in this area is desert with very little if any water to deal with Ive find that its not necessary to do much chain maintenance other than checking the adjustment. The sealed chains in general last quite awhile but once the they get worn and stretched out alittle the seals arent as effective and then water can find its way in and wash out the grease, if kerosene or something of that nature gets inside it will break down the grease/lube also causing the chain to wear out even faster. I always try to avoid the chain with pressure washers for the same reasons.

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