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Oil level Issue

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Hey, I have a 2002 Yamaha yz250f and am going to the dunes in a couple day. As I am preparing my bike for the dunes I go to check my oil. It read just above the lowest mark (has not been ran for a week) so I dumped some in. I went to check it again and nothing showed up on the dip stick. NONE. So I dumped a quart into the bike until the dip stick read very low. I then started up the bike and let it run for maybe 10 seconds. I then waited 30 mins. Then checked my oil and it was way above the top dipstick line. So what now. I am so confused?  

Edited by ctbboss

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You can maybe try to siphon some out from the fill hole, otherwise you're going to have to drain it completely and start over again. 

Always remember, after you add oil you have to start the bike, let it run for a minute, shut it off and let it set for a while before you can get an accurate reading.

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Hey, I have a 2002 Yamaha yz250f and am going to the dunes in a couple day. As I am preparing my bike for the dunes I go to check my oil. It read just above the lowest mark (has not been ran for a week) so I dumped some in. I went to check it again and nothing showed up on the dip stick. NONE. So I dumped a quart into the bike until the dip stick read very low. I then started up the bike and let it run for maybe 10 seconds. I then waited 30 mins. Then checked my oil and it was way above the top dipstick line. So what now. I am so confused?  

 

 

Do you not own a effin manual? Read the damn manual and learn how to correctly check the oil level.

 

And STOP trying to run it until you drain the oil and start over correctly. You have an extra QUART in the engine, it's so over-full that oil is blowing out the exhaust. You're going to hydro-lock it and bend the rod.

 

"ENGINE OIL LEVEL INSPECTION
1. Start the engine, warm it up for several
minutes, and then turn off the engine and
wait for five minutes.
2. Place the machine on a level place and
hold it up on upright position by placing the
suitable stand under the engine.
3. Inspect:
• Oil level
Place the dipstick in the opening but DO NOT screw it in.
Check the oil level on the dipstick.
Edited by Chokey
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Question ;  On a 2 stroke motor, the correct level of oil is when you fill it up all the way until that seep hole spills out?

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Question ;  On a 2 stroke motor, the correct level of oil is when you fill it up all the way until that seep hole spills out?

 

 

Depends on the bike. Some use a weep hole, some use a dip stick, and some have a sight glass.

 

Most modern MX two-strokes have a sight glass.

 

My KX250 has a sight glass, and the manual calls for 850mL of oil, but I run the entire quart, because I'm a terrible clutch abuser and the extra oil volume disperses the clutch contaminants better.

Edited by Chokey
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Depends on the bike. Some use a weep hole, some use a dip stick, and some have a sight glass.

 

Most modern MX two-strokes have a sight glass.

 

My KX250 has a sight glass, and the manual calls for 850mL of oil, but I run the entire quart, because I'm a terrible clutch abuser and the extra oil volume disperses the clutch contaminants better.

Is it bad if you overfill oil on a 2 stroke? 

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Is it bad if you overfill oil on a 2 stroke? 

 

 

Two-strokes are different than shared-sump four-strokes. A two-stroke tranny isn't freely connected to a crankcase that has a big piston moving up and down and creating huge pressure pulses, and the crank on a two-stroke doesn't spin in the pool of oil that's in the tranny.

 

Generally the only thing that will happen is a small amount of oil may blow out the vent tube if the tranny is really over-filled. But I'm only running a few extra ounces, it's not going to hurt  thing.

 

The only drawback to running extra oil in the tranny of a two-stroke is that if the level is high enough there can be a lot of additional drag from the clutch and gears spinning in the pool of oil, and the spinning gears and clutch basket can mix a lot of air into the oil, reducing it's ability to lubricate. But you'd have to overfill it by a lot more than I do for that to be an issue.

 

Do NOT over-fill a four-stroke with a shared sump (meaning the engine and tranny share the oil). Bad things can happen.

 

I wouldn't dump an entire quart in a 125 though, that would be a bit too much.

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Also when I start it the header pipe smokes and oil drips out of it.

 

that model is known for having a factory rubber plug in the head that eventually starts pulsing with the engine running and leaking oil. Get a new one and put a dime between the plug and the keeper to prevent future problems.

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Two-strokes are different than shared-sump four-strokes. A two-stroke tranny isn't freely connected to a crankcase that has a big piston moving up and down and creating huge pressure pulses, and the crank on a two-stroke doesn't spin in the pool of oil that's in the tranny.

Generally the only thing that will happen is a small amount of oil may blow out the vent tube if the tranny is really over-filled. But I'm only running a few extra ounces, it's not going to hurt thing.

The only drawback to running extra oil in the tranny of a two-stroke is that if the level is high enough there can be a lot of additional drag from the clutch and gears spinning in the pool of oil, and the spinning gears and clutch basket can mix a lot of air into the oil, reducing it's ability to lubricate. But you'd have to overfill it by a lot more than I do for that to be an issue.

Do NOT over-fill a four-stroke with a shared sump (meaning the engine and tranny share the oil). Bad things can happen.

I wouldn't dump an entire quart in a 125 though, that would be a bit too much.

Don't feed the troll chokey..

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Thats one of the frame sump models, its a little different than your typical oil change. The majority of the oil is held in the frame/sump, separate from the motor. Definitely buy a manual and follow it. Its very easy to overfill. What you saw...was...after it sits for a while the oil will drain out of the sump, into the motor and appear to be low.

 

And a tip...when you let it idle to check the level...dont hit the throttle.

Edited by jeffdanger
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Thats one of the frame sump models, its a little different than your typical oil change. Definitely buy a manual and follow it. Its very easy to overfill. What you saw...was...after it sits for a while the oil will drain out of the sump and appear to be low.

 

And a tip...when you let it idle to check the level...dont hit the throttle.

Yes, dry sump bikes are tricky if you don't check them correctly . 

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that model is known for having a factory rubber plug in the head that eventually starts pulsing with the engine running and leaking oil. Get a new one and put a dime between the plug and the keeper to prevent future problems.

So suppose I don't get this fixed before I go to the dunes. Will it be an issue?

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So suppose I don't get this fixed before I go to the dunes. Will it be an issue?

IT will not be if you:

1. drain all oil out

2. measure out the correct amount

3. add the correct measured amount back in.

Now, don't add insult to injury by over tightening the drain bolts or stripping them out, or not tightening them enough and loosing them out.

G o o d  L u c k

shhheeeees

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IT will not be if you:

1. drain all oil out

2. measure out the correct amount

3. add the correct measured amount back in.

Now, don't add insult to injury by over tightening the drain bolts or stripping them out, or not tightening them enough and loosing them out.

G o o d L u c k

shhheeeees

Haha okay sounds good.

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