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Well, I think I found my clutch problem. (I couldn't edit my other post)

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I hope I'm not spamming this forum, but I couldn't figure out how to edit my other post around having to pull my clutch all the way to the bar to disengage (with a new cable adjusted all the way out.)

 

I was told to pull the cover and take a look inside. Here's the pics (and some questions)

 

 

I drained the transmission oil before getting started. It looked super milky, is this normal?

VOKwXaDl.jpg

 

 

Next, I pulled the cover. Notice anything missing? Yea, and one of the clutch spring bolts is different.

DCj1Vajl.jpg

 

 

Here's what the basket looked like. oof.

58iZ3uKl.jpg

 

 

 

It had those dimples on everything. I mic'd the clutch plates and they were within spec. 

 

So, me being new to dirtbikes, what's my next step? Complete new clutch kit? I've read the the OEM Suzuki kit is a crowd favorite. I've mostly been riding trails, I hear a lot about rekluse clutches. As someone who doesn't ride that much, would that be worth the money? I'm not racing, just mostly woods riding with my friends. 

 

I'm thinking springs, basket and plates. Any advice would be mucho appreciated. 

 

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I hope I'm not spamming this forum, but I couldn't figure out how to edit my other post around having to pull my clutch all the way to the bar to disengage (with a new cable adjusted all the way out.)

 

I was told to pull the cover and take a look inside. Here's the pics (and some questions)

 

 

I drained the transmission oil before getting started. It looked super milky, is this normal?

VOKwXaDl.jpg

 

 

Next, I pulled the cover. Notice anything missing? Yea, and one of the clutch spring bolts is different.

DCj1Vajl.jpg

 

 

Here's what the basket looked like. oof.

58iZ3uKl.jpg

 

 

 

It had those dimples on everything. I mic'd the clutch plates and they were within spec. 

 

So, me being new to dirtbikes, what's my next step? Complete new clutch kit? I've read the the OEM Suzuki kit is a crowd favorite. I've mostly been riding trails, I hear a lot about rekluse clutches. As someone who doesn't ride that much, would that be worth the money? I'm not racing, just mostly woods riding with my friends. 

 

I'm thinking springs, basket and plates. Any advice would be mucho appreciated. 

 

 

Sand down the ridges on the basket where the friction plates and steel plates go til they are all perfectly smooth, secondly get the correct springs (proper compression) for all of the threads in the pressure plate. 3rd the bolts have to be all the same and the washers for the pressure plate have to be all the same so that when it gets torqued down the pressure is spread evenly across the pressure plate. When you have one bolt that's shorter like the hex bolt you got there and one spring different than the rest on the pressure plate then when you compress it the steel plates can get jammed/seized up on one side unevenly and the clutch actuator pushes it back unevenly and you end up getting locked up

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Thanks. The ridges are kinda deep, so I think filing them down on both side may open the gap up. Is that OK? Is there a certain method to filing? The dimples are on the inner and outer parts of the basket.

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Thanks. The ridges are kinda deep, so I think filing them down on both side may open the gap up. Is that OK? Is there a certain method to filing? The dimples are on the inner and outer parts of the basket.

 

File them down with sand paper til they are smooth then take the steel plates put them in the basket and run them back and forth if they don't get stuck as you move them back and forth evenly then it should be good but make sure they are filed down smooth, if you have a dremel easier way is to get one of those polishing carbon steel brushes onto your dremel, put the dremel on low power and it makes smoothing it out lot less difficult

 

also put the friction plates on back and forth for the outer ridges on the basket file those down smooth too and test out the friction plates moving them back and forth evenly\

 

also make sure you've got everything done (springs,bolts,washers) fixed the ridges etc then make sure you put the tranny fluid back in there , i use ATF don't run the bike without fluid

Edited by 78SuzyQ

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Get a new Hinson or Wiseco basket, OEM inner hub and a set of clutch plates and springs. You will be out a bit of loot, but now you will have a long lasting, proper engaging clutch.

Do not waste your time buying an OEM basket, they are made of butter.

And you're correct in that basket is beyond filing out.

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Can you guys recommend a good source for these parts? 

 

edit: also, I think I put synthetic oil in it when I changed the oil after buying it. A guy at work said that's all he runs in his RM. (for what it's worth)

Edited by FullTilt151

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Cool, I'll check them out. I was checking Motorcycle Superstore since we have a retail outlet here, I see a bunch of spring kits, do the bolts typically come with the spring kits?

 

 

no you'll have to get them oem

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just to let you know when you get a hinson/ etc basket you must press your gear out of your old basket and install it in the new one.

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Man, Hinson is proud of their baskets eh? It's looking like around 500 bucks for a new setup. That's a 1/3 of what I paid for the bike ;)

 

Not sure about the oil. Once I get the clutch sorted, I'll run ATF as mentioned earlier, then drain it again and check. Is there a way I can be sure it's coolant? or not?

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Man, Hinson is proud of their baskets eh? It's looking like around 500 bucks for a new setup. That's a 1/3 of what I paid for the bike ;)

 

Not sure about the oil. Once I get the clutch sorted, I'll run ATF as mentioned earlier, then drain it again and check. Is there a way I can be sure it's coolant? or not?

 

 

Hinson basket should be no more than $200.

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I ended up going with a Wiseco basket for 170. Got Wiseco clutch, plates and springs. Ordered OEM bolts from BikeBandit. I couldn't find an inner hub anywhere (yet).

 

Just so I'm clear: Use ATF fluid in the trans right? I need to soak the plates for at least 24hrs too right?

 

(This is my first dirtbike clutch replacement.)

 

 

Thanks

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use gearbox oil. honestly if your going out and buying atf why not just buy the actual oil that goes in dirtbike gearboxes... atf has a much different job as too what a gear oil does.

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I just did the clutch in my 07 RM125. I don't know why or what brand they were but the inner drive plate exploded. It didn't look all that old, but definately wasn't OEM.

I got everything from MotoSport. I went with OEM plates, springs, and basket. I also changed out the two bearings since I was in there, and the fact I had the "complete failure".  My inner hub was okay so I left it alone, but I saw them on MotoSport OEM page. They are/were running OEM for 25% off for a while.

I use 10-40 oil in my 2 stroke boxes. It is inexpensive and I change it every 4-5 hours anyway. It's what Suzuki manuals call for too.

I soaked the plates before install, and changed the oil again after a quick ride just to be sure any metal was gone. The clutch is so nice now I'm thinking of taking the bike back from my son!

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use gearbox oil. honestly if your going out and buying atf why not just buy the actual oil that goes in dirtbike gearboxes... atf has a much different job as too what a gear oil does.

 

lots of gear oil has additives in it which are anti-friction which causes the clutch to slip

 

it can be tricky

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use gearbox oil. honestly if your going out and buying atf why not just buy the actual oil that goes in dirtbike gearboxes... atf has a much different job as too what a gear oil does.

 

 

You know what an automatic transmission is? Clutch plates and gears, much like your dirt bike. Many dirt bike manufactures over the years have recommended ATF.

Truth is, most anything will work in a 2 stroke tranny, motor oil, gearbox oil, ATF. About the only thing you don't want is energy conserving oil with friction modifiers.

ATF works great, is cheap, squeaks a tinny bit more hp because it is thin, and in some 2 stroke gear boxs it is all I will use because of it's durability and good clutch hook up. 

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