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Countershaft Seal Retainer Phillips Head Screws, etc...

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Hello All,

It has been awhile since i've posted because i have been DRZ less for about two years.  I re-acquired a DRZ 400 SM that has been neglected for some time though it only has around 5000 miles on it.  Short story is, The previous owner replaced the fuel petcock with one from an E-model.  This petcock needed turned off everytime the bike sat, i forgot to turn it off, the crank case filled with gasoline, the bike wouldn't start, i realized the crankcase was full of gasoline when i noticed the tank empty and all of the gas and oil mixture leaking out of the shifter seal, i drained everything and started into replacing seals.

 

I have the shifter seal out (it had turned to jelly but its out)

The clutch hub is broken but removed

i can't remove the retainer around the countershaft seal because the phillips head screws are locked into the case and are completely wrecked.

 

3 questions

 

Does anybody have any good suggestions for removing the retainer and getting the phillips screws out?

 

Are there any other seals in the engine or transmission that could have been affected by the Gasoline?

 

Can i replace the clutch hub with one from an E-model.  (should be the same right?)

 

Any help would be appreciated.

 

Thanks

 

 

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As long as the bike didn't run you didn't hurt anything. Just change the oil then change it again.

For the Philips screws either use a hand impact driver (the kind you hit with a hammer)

Or get some penetrating oil and a torch, hit the screws with both. Then take a center punch or a chisel and a hammer, then hit the screw on an angle until it turns

Edited by Gsxrstuntdrz

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As long as the bike didn't run you didn't hurt anything? Just change the oil then change it again.

For the Philips screws either use a hand impact driver (the kind you hit with a hammer)

Or get some penetrating oil and a torch, hit the screws with both. Then take a center punch or a chisel and a hammer, then hit the screw on an angle until it turns

Thank you, I appreciate the help.  Though the phillips heads are already trashed, after using the hand impact driver, i will try a torch and the punch.  My friend is going to try welding a phillips bit to each screw allowing me to put a 1/4" socket driver on it.  But i'll try the punch first.  thanks

 

John

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Thank you, I appreciate the help. Though the phillips heads are already trashed, after using the hand impact driver, i will try a torch and the punch. My friend is going to try welding a phillips bit to each screw allowing me to put a 1/4" socket driver on it. But i'll try the punch first. thanks

John

I just used the hammer and chisel method yesterday to remove the Philips screw on the retainer for the clutch pushrod seal. I actually like using a chisel more than a punch. With a chisel you can pound a little slot on the screw head to work with. Keep at it, as long as you can get the chisel to bite you should be able to get it to turn. Will definitely take a few good whacks though. Good luck

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pretty sure these arnt Philips screws and thats why everyone always strips them. there is another chinese knockoff very similar to a philips bit that has a different angle. i forget the name of the style but im sure google can find it in a sec 

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pretty sure these arnt Philips screws and thats why everyone always strips them. there is another chinese knockoff very similar to a philips bit that has a different angle. i forget the name of the style but im sure google can find it in a sec 

 

JIS (Japanese Industrial Standard)

 

http://www.vesseltools.com/hand-tools/screwdrivers/jis-japanese-industrial-standard/view-all-products.html

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Pull your spark plug out too, put a rag over the hole & crank engine over to get any gas out. 

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ok.  Removed the screws with a Chisel and Hammer.  loaded with threadlocker from the factory.  thanks for the info yall.  DRZ should be running again soon.

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Took a 20mi ride across the desert Lancaster to Rosamond...stopped to eat and Wow lots of oil leaking. Got AAA to tow me home and next day took off drive sprocket guard and blam sprocket nut hit the driveway !!! Nut was stripped lock washer stripped shaft splines looked OK and so did the threads. Sprocket just "floating" around on the shaft... Who knows how long I rode it that way ??? Anyway a couple of questions on the repair. I ordered all the parts.

 

1) How do I know if I damaged the "2nd gear bushing"  I read about in the FAQ's??? The shaft spins freely and has no play in it. (feels totally solid)

 

2) There is an O-ring "# 37" on the exploded view of the countershaft...what if I don't know where that is ??? I'm going get the flash-light out and look inside the shaft area again once the parts get here. If its still on the shaft, can I leave it there. What's a good way to get it out/off...It's pretty cramped in there.

 

Any other pointers as to doing the seal replacement would be appreciated. First time doing this repair.

 

Thanks in advance

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1) How do I know if I damaged the "2nd gear bushing"  I read about in the FAQ's??? The shaft spins freely and has no play in it. (feels totally solid)

 

Once the nut is torqued to 100ftlb, with chain off sprocket and transmission in neutral, turn the countershaft by hand.. it should rotate freely, no catches, grinding and just a slight "drag"

All the ones I've found bad were obvious when turned by hand as "not right" 

 

2) There is an O-ring "# 37" on the exploded view of the countershaft...what if I don't know where that is ??? I'm going get the flash-light out and look inside the shaft area again once the parts get here. If its still on the shaft, can I leave it there. What's a good way to get it out/off...It's pretty cramped in there.

Dont know where it is at as in you dropped it when you took the parts off? If so, replace it with new.. 

 

Your asking about part number 39 in this view https://www.thumpertalk.com/shop/oem/images/Suzuki/2000/Motorcycles/1916_20.gif

 

If so it is placed inside the spacer, seated in a groove 

 

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1) How do I know if I damaged the "2nd gear bushing"  I read about in the FAQ's??? The shaft spins freely and has no play in it. (feels totally solid)

 

Once the nut is torqued to 100ftlb, with chain off sprocket and transmission in neutral, turn the countershaft by hand.. it should rotate freely, no catches, grinding and just a slight "drag"

All the ones I've found bad were obvious when turned by hand as "not right" 

 

2) There is an O-ring "# 37" on the exploded view of the countershaft...what if I don't know where that is ??? I'm going get the flash-light out and look inside the shaft area again once the parts get here. If its still on the shaft, can I leave it there. What's a good way to get it out/off...It's pretty cramped in there.

Dont know where it is at as in you dropped it when you took the parts off? If so, replace it with new.. 

 

Your asking about part number 39 in this view https://www.thumpertalk.com/shop/oem/images/Suzuki/2000/Motorcycles/1916_20.gif

 

If so it is placed inside the spacer, seated in a groove 

 

 

 

Thanks for the reply EM...

 

Yeah...#39 in your link...think I was looking at a Suzuki parts oem version...labeled 37.  It wasn't inside the spacer when I pulled the spacer off with channel-locks??? I didn't see it on the shaft but will look again...Hence I don't know where it is...??? Any easy ways of pulling it off the shaft if it is still on there...?

 

Thanks again!

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The O ring only fits inside the spacer.  If it is not there, it was not there to start with.  A reason for an oil leak if the nut comes loose only a little bit.

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Thank you, I appreciate the help.  Though the phillips heads are already trashed, after using the hand impact driver, i will try a torch and the punch.  My friend is going to try welding a phillips bit to each screw allowing me to put a 1/4" socket driver on it.  But i'll try the punch first.  thanks

 

John

Try cutting a slot across the screw with a dremmel, then use a screw drive bit in the "hit with a hammer impact driver", along with heat.

worth a try

Ken

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The O ring only fits inside the spacer. If it is not there, it was not there to start with. A reason for an oil leak if the nut comes loose only a little bit.

The reason I suggest looking on the shaft as well is I have seen (found it) placed on the shaft between the bushing and spacer.

Of course it does not belong there and it does no good there never the less folks still place it on the shaft before installing the spacer.

As Nobel said if it's not there it's not there.

Eather forgotten all together or mis installed and then came off and is in the motor.

Replace with new and move on

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Oh yes, I can see that might happen. I guess you have to consider every possibility.

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Oh yes, I can see that might happen. I guess you have to consider every possibility.

I think most times it gets cut and comes off the shaft in the process of tightening the countershaft nut.... as I have found the O ring bits in the drain pan, inside a case, and a few times on the shaft after I removed the sprocket and spacer. 

I blame the parts fiche partly for the o ring placement confusion.

o ring countershaft.jpg

 

Kind of makes it look like it goes on the shaft, not in the spacer

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