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Anyone use a "crow's foot" for spokes?

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I am an avid shooter as well as rider. I have used a crows foot to remove gun barrels before and I recently had an idea that I could avoid the sky high price of a spoke torque wrench by using one of these. I am sort of worried that the area between the spokes is too tight for a setup like that. Anyone use one before? Let me know how it works.

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It seems to me that torquing spokes might be OK for a newly laced wheel but a waste of time if there is some ride time on it. Too easy to get false readings with possible dirt and corrosion in the picture.

I use a tusk standard wrench (no torque) and common sense when needed.

Edited by Kroynon
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Reading these responses, I have a relevant question:

When lacing and truing do people always use a spoke torque wrench? Or do some people just use a spoke wrench and sound the spokes?

I've seen people do it with a regular spoke wrench and listening to the sound.

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I use the cheap one that came with the bike, its my least favorite maintenance item!

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Even the "Pro's" don't use a "torque wrench" on the spokes, just a couple different sized spoke wrenches.

Really? That makes sense those guys are factory mechanics though. I am just an idiot with a motorcycle that can very easily f something up in a hurry. I'm not very good at it I'll tell you that.

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The torque wrench measures the resistance of the nipple, not the tension of the spoke.

It is useless.

Since the spoke is threaded at the end and the nipple is threaded to the nipples it does measure resistance. If the spoke comes loose and backs out then if you torqued it down to spec then there you go. There is a spec for it in manuals.

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Since the spoke is threaded at the end and the nipple is threaded to the nipples it does measure resistance. If the spoke comes loose and backs out then if you torqued it down to spec then there you go. There is a spec for it in manuals.

 

Sorry, but a spoke torque wrench does not measure the spoke  tension. It only measures the resistance of the nipple against the threads, and the rim.

It has no purpose accept at new wheel assembly time.

Once water gets into the nipple, the dielectric corrsion starts, and the torque wrench no longer has meaning.

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I've always used a small, good quality adjustable wrench, and the tap method. One day, I bought a motion pro spoke wrench. First time, first spoke I used it on, I snapped that thing. It got replaced. And again...first spoke I used it on, snapped that one too. My trusty old adjustable never lets me down

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Good luck finding a crows foot in 6.8,7.2 mm or whatever size they are.

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Sorry, but a spoke torque wrench does not measure the spoke tension. It only measures the resistance of the nipple against the threads, and the rim.

It has no purpose accept at new wheel assembly time.

Once water gets into the nipple, the dielectric corrsion starts, and the torque wrench no longer has meaning.

So you're saying that when a nipple backs out it doesn't relieve tension on the spoke which doesn't make them have a rattle instead of a tone? Makes tons of sense. So when spokes get loose it has no bearing in relation to the nipple even though they are integrally threaded? And oem manufacturers put torque specs for them in owners manuals for absolutely no reason? Sure I believe you buddy.

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