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Question about Tacomas

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I see these style Tacoma's for way less than the extended cab ones but man they are so low to the ground and the tires/wheels are so small. My question is am I stuck with a tire/wheel that size? What if I lifted it 2 inches would that matter or allow me to put on a bigger tire?

tacoma 2.jpg

tacoma.jpg

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You know its low with small tires because its 2wd, and thats why its way less than a 4wd extended cab.  Lifting and putting bigger tires on a 2wd is kinda pointless unless you want to run baja or something.  You could put slightly bigger tires on that without having to lift it.

 

Im not sure about the 2005+ models but they used to have a model called the "PreRunner" that was basically a 2wd truck with the 4wd suspension and tires, so it looked like a 4wd truck (taller and bigger tires).  I think they usually came in extended cab thou.

 

You could also get a regular cab with 4wd that would probably be a good bit cheaper than the extended/4 door trucks.

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my son has the prerunner it isn't quite the stance of the 4x4 IMO   but the price difference was huge

and it has a bitching locking rear axle

 

i would see if you can find something closer to what you want lift & tire wise   let someone else do the work and take the $ hit

 

i would never do a regular cab anything  myself maybe that is why there is a big $ variance ? supply and demand

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That's not a small tacoma ImageUploadedByThumper Talk1402779241.073443.jpg

This is a small tacoma, but it gets 30mpg on highway and 25 in the city. Small is not a bad thing, I can load things soooo much easier than ya dad's tundra, and if I want to get go off-road I take my bike.

ImageUploadedByThumper Talk1402779220.582595.jpg

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The thing is, this "low" style that you are referring to in Tacoma's, especially in single cab, typically means that the tacoma has a 4cyl, opposed to their peppy 4.0l V6. Yes, it's possible to throw some bigger rubber on there with a small level type lift, but you'll notice the loss in power, especially with a 4 cylinder under the hood. IMO, I would look for an early 05 or 06 in 4x4 with the V6. You'll appreciate the extra power in the long run.

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I see thanks for the response gents. I live 5 minutes from Canada so we definitely get snow. Would a 2WD with good tires be a nightmare to drive? mostly slow commuting. I live in town and here the road crews are pretty awesome and clear stuff pretty quick...

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Would a 2WD with good tires be a nightmare to drive?

 

Yes. There's nothing on the road worse in the snow then a 2 wheel drive truck, especially a light one like a quarter ton. Get the 4x4 or don't bother, 2 wheel drives are a waste of time unless you don't get winter. Plus the 4x4's are much more desireable so you'll have an easier time selling it when it's time to go.

 

Can you drive a 2 wheel drive in the winter no problem? Sure. I did, with a locking rear and good tires. Did it suck? Yes. Even with weight in the bed, they're never going to be any good in the snow and there's going to be times when you can't go up a certain road or even leave your driveway where someone with a Honda Civic or a 4x4 truck can no problem.

 

Get the 4x4, don't worry about height and drive it. Enjoy. 

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I see thanks for the response gents. I live 5 minutes from Canada so we definitely get snow. Would a 2WD with good tires be a nightmare to drive? mostly slow commuting. I live in town and here the road crews are pretty awesome and clear stuff pretty quick...

 

I'm going to disagree with the previous post, and say with weight and good tires you'll be fine as long as you don't have decent hills to climb.  I'm much further south, living in the country outside of Cincinnati OH, but this past winter we had more snow than I can recall in a long time.  And as luck would have it the 4X4 wasn't working in my Nissan Frontier.  Even without weight in the bed I never had a problem going anywhere I wanted.  My brother drives a standard cab, 4 cylinder 2wd Ford Ranger and after adding a couple hundred lbs of weight to his bed, he did fine also.  4x4 is over-rated IMO for street use in snow.  It helps for sure, but having weight, decent tires, and going easy on the throttle will get you by just as fine.

 

If you lived out in the country and might have to drive though a foot of snow ona regular bases my response would be different, but if you live close to town and the crews clear the roads in a timely manner I think you'll be fine with 2WD.

Edited by bassjam

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I lived in Northern Michigan, Ohio, and Alaska with 2WD and got along fine. Then in Arizona, of all places, at one of the gated communities I was working in, they required 4WD or chaining up to enter during snow. Was due a new truck anyway so bought a Toyota 4WD. For the money, it's worth it for me.

Mike

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Id never own a Japanese truck

 

I used to enjoy spending my weekends and evenings repairing my trucks too.

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Lol, I've got 180,000on my Chevy and it's never failed me, even ran the tranny out of oil and drove it. Filled it back up, drives fine. AC blows icy, engine pulls strong. Did a little front end work but that's about it, you have to do that on any truck with that many miles.

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I have a 2005 PreRunner Access Cab with a 4 cylinder that is way more fun to drive than my newer 2012 Double Cab 4x4 V6. I prefer to drive my older 4 cylinder. Definately get 4x4, other than that, get what fits your needs.

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