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has anyone rectified the AC to DC on a stock X stator?

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isn't the power going to the battery AC also? then runs through a R/R and turned to DC? I was I thinking I could pigggy back it, or use a separate R/R and send it to the battery. then I can run a small LED bar?

Edited by DanBRP

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 Yes, the stock stator produces approx 70 watts AC, which is run through a R/R.   That splits things up to 45 watts for the head light and 25 watts for the battery and tail light.

 

Jim.

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Yes, the stock stator produces approx 70 watts AC, which is run through a R/R. That splits things up to 45 watts for the head light and 25 watts for the battery and tail light.

Jim.

so I could r r the 45w going to the headlight and get an extra 45w of power to the battery?

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so I could r r the 45w going to the headlight and get an extra 45w of power to the battery?

 

 Basically yes.   You could disconnect the headlight, then add on another R/R that could handle 45 watts (or replace the stock one with something that could handle 70) and have 70 watts of DC available in total.

 

 I'd probably add a second one rather then mess with what's already there.  Would be easy to stick behind the front number plate and you would not need to worry about fuses/wiring in the existing stuff (what's there is already setup to get 45 watts to the front number plate, you just need it to be DC).

 

  Look at the link and the work Mr Rong posted.  That's all you'd need to run a LED light bar.  Just make sure what you wire up can handle 45 watts.

 

Jim.

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I haven't done it on the X yet but I made a couple of these for my snowmobiles and they work great...for give my wiring diagram but it gets the point across

http://www.thumpertalk.com/topic/1069910-is-this-the-holy-grail-of-low-cost-headlight-options/#entry11380355

 

Just a heads up to those that might want to use this for their headlight. A more commonly available 3 pin regulator LM7812 is generally only good to 1A. Some others are available up to 3A capacity. At full load they will get smokin' hot. Without proper head sinking they will just die on you. So, for a headlight at some 20 to 45 watts (1.5 to 4 amps) it's important to remember that the internals of a home built RR needs to be up to the task. No one needs a dead headlight and a melted plastic box while on the trail.

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Just a heads up to those that might want to use this for their headlight. A more commonly available 3 pin regulator LM7812 is generally only good to 1A. Some others are available up to 3A capacity. At full load they will get smokin' hot. Without proper head sinking they will just die on you. So, for a headlight at some 20 to 45 watts (1.5 to 4 amps) it's important to remember that the internals of a home built RR needs to be up to the task. No one needs a dead headlight and a melted plastic box while on the trail.

Another possible alternative would be to look at the compufire r/r, I believe the single phase ones for the CRF. These are a series regulator/rectifier and don't generate nearly as much heat as a shunt type. They can be had cheap on ebay and are bullet proof. Wiring one in is on my bucket list of things to do. 

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ok went to RadioShack and got a bridge rectifier. hooked it up and I'm getting 4.5v DC from the leads. does that sound right? it was about 15v AC from the factory leads

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Just a heads up to those that might want to use this for their headlight. A more commonly available 3 pin regulator LM7812 is generally only good to 1A. Some others are available up to 3A capacity. At full load they will get smokin' hot. Without proper head sinking they will just die on you. So, for a headlight at some 20 to 45 watts (1.5 to 4 amps) it's important to remember that the internals of a home built RR needs to be up to the task. No one needs a dead headlight and a melted plastic box while on the trail.

This is all true...my setup was to run a GPS and phone charger...you would need the regulator to handle the amp load

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If all you did was rectify 15VAC you should see in the order of 20 VAC. It would be 15 x 1. 414.

 

<edit>

Sorry that would be 20VDC no ac as stated. Actually depending on how well you filtered it and what the load was you would see something pulsing between a high of 21.21V peak and some lower number. Unfiltered you'd see (if you were to scope it), a series of rounded bumps all peaking at 21V and dropping to 0V. before immediatly ramping up again. It is basically a sine wave with both lobes above the 0V mark. That is, of course if you used a bridge rectifier for full wave rectification.

Edited by harkon

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well it's running a 36w 7.5" led light bar no problem! using a full wave bridge rectifier from radio shack (5$) and I borrowed a cheap led light to test. going for a night ride tomorrow night to test it out.

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well it's running a 36w 7.5" led light bar no problem! using a full wave bridge rectifier from radio shack (5$) and I borrowed a cheap led light to test. going for a night ride tomorrow night to test it out.

 

Shouldn't be a problem unless you exceed the input voltage rating of the light bar. Simple is good ... for sure!

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Shouldn't be a problem unless you exceed the input voltage rating of the light bar. Simple is good ... for sure!

I'm only seeing 9 at idle, I will check at higher RPM's but light is rated for 10-32v Edited by DanBRP

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I'm only seeing 9 at idle, I will check at higher RPM's but light is rated for 10-32v

That would mean it has some internal regulation so you should be golden as long as you don't exceed the high end of that. Even then, generally there's a bit of headroom built in, but it's not something you can count on 100%

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