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Zuz500

Any DRZ400S suspension adjustment guides?

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Hi,

 

I've looked for a solid 2 months on where to find a solid DRZ400S suspension adjustment guide which includes adjustments to the rear suspension and front, as well as setting the sag. I have a good idea how to set the sag, by jacking the bike up and taking the static sag measurement minus the sag measurement with the driver on the bike and mine is 120mm. So EVERY single forum and post I've read, people just say to take the right side panel off and tap the bottom nut on the shock to tighten the sag. But this does not answer anything else. No one on the entire internet including youtube has posted a detailed walkthrough how to adjust anything else besides the race sag. I'm extremely surprised there are in depth guides for engine, carb, and other replacements, but nothing at all concerning a suspension adjustment to tighten it up.

 

Does anyone know how or have a guide to adjust the suspension on the DRZ400S? I've even asked a license motorcycle mechanic I know and they didn't even know how to adjust it...

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There are many sites on the web that cover this topic in detail. It may not be DR-Z specific but a similar bike may get you the info you need.

 

www.dynobike.com/motorcycle_suspension.htm

 

www.motocross-racing-tips.com/dirt_bike_suspension.html

 

I too do not know what the actual measurements are. I would have to search like you for that info. Maybe someone at www.pro-action.com could answer that question for you if you asked them. Hope some of this helps you out. I had my sags set by ProAction Bob locally so I don't know the actual numbers. I will find out the next time I get it adjusted so I can do it myself in the future.

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Thanks for the post. Unfortunately I've checked that link many times and it is very ambiguous as to how to actually do the adjustments and doesn't show diagram or step by steps how and where to do them. In fact, the writer of the article even admits to it being very confusing to know what to adjust. Race sag seems to be the easiest thing to adjust out of the clicker adjustments, fork compression and rebound adjustments, shock compression adjustments and shock rebound adjustments.

Edited by Zuz500

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Thanks for the post. Unfortunately I've checked that link many times and it is very ambiguous as to how to actually do the adjustments and doesn't show diagram or step by steps how and where to do them. In fact, the writer of the article even admits to it being very confusing to know what to adjust. Race sag seems to be the easiest thing to adjust out of the clicker adjustments, fork compression and rebound adjustments, shock compression adjustments and shock rebound adjustments.

Maybe should get off the computer and have a look at your bike.

Forks, rebound adjustment on the top, compression at the bottom, clockwise is stiffer, counter clockwise is softer.

Shock, rebound on the bottom, compression at the top, same deal, clockwise is stiffer, counter clockwise is softer.

Use the correct size flat blade screw driver to make adjustments, do one thing at a time, record what you do so as you cane return to a previous setting but first you have to get a base line setting.

Without the correct spring weights and correct sag you will never get a truly good ride, without re valving you will not get a great ride.

There is more than enough information on the interweb to help you set up your suspension, so stop procrastinating, get out and do some research.

Edited by Black_DRZ
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Maybe should get off the computer and have a look at your bike.

Forks, rebound adjustment on the top, compression at the bottom, clockwise is stiffer, counter clockwise is softer.

Shock, rebound on the bottom, compression at the top, same deal, clockwise is stiffer, counter clockwise is softer.

Use the correct size flat blade screw driver to make adjustments, do one thing at a time, record what you do so as you cane return to a previous setting but first you have to get a base line setting.

Without the correct spring weights and correct sag you will never get a truly good ride, without re valving you will not get a great ride.

There is more than enough information on the interweb to help you set up your suspension, so stop procrastinating, get out and do some research.

No amount of looking at a bike would help one understand the procedure for adjusting suspension if they haven't done it before, just like one wouldn't know how to perform open heart surgery upon looking at a body.

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No amount of looking at a bike would help one understand the procedure for adjusting suspension if they haven't done it before, just like one wouldn't know how to perform open heart surgery upon looking at a body.

And suspension is not rocket science. :p

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And suspension is not rocket science. :p

Walk up to a rocket and perform adjustments on it without anyone ever explaining the procedure and tell me how it works out for you. :ride:

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And to do things for the first time, people need a guide or else you screw it up more than you started :)

I've seen 4 different threads on this site alone saying there's no info on suspension so you're wrong yet again :)

I see someone's getting angry over losing an argument :)

:p

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And to do things for the first time, people need a guide or else you screw it up more than you started :)

I've seen 4 different threads on this site alone saying there's no info on suspension so you're wrong yet again :)

I see someone's getting angry over losing an argument  :)

:p

I'm not angry and I was unaware I was having an argument. If that is what your here for maybe you should move on.

Myself and others have posted links and advice to assist you in setting up your DRZ, yet you continue to claim lack of comprehension.

Screwing it up is part of life and the learning process, even rocket scientists and heart surgeons have to start somewhere.

This is why you were advised to record your setting's so you could return to a previous setting when you SCREW IT UP.

I say once again to you, everybody has to do everything once for the first time, it is better to fail trying than not to try at all.

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I'm not angry and I was unaware I was having an argument. If that is what your here for maybe you should move on.

Myself and others have posted links and advice to assist you in setting up your DRZ, yet you continue to claim lack of comprehension.

Screwing it up is part of life and the learning process, even rocket scientists and heart surgeons have to start somewhere.

This is why you were advised to record your setting's so you could return to a previous setting when you SCREW IT UP.

I say once again to you, everybody has to do everything once for the first time, it is better to fail trying than not to try at all.

Like I said I have seen all of those links as well as the other 4 people that started threads on here and they provide no concrete diagrams or descriptions on what to do. Some people are visual learners. You can't just tell someone to twist a screw clockwise on top of the compartment in between the two rails beneath the fork assembly beside the shock inside and expect them to know what to do. In all my years of education I have never been told to go and blindly try and attempt something that I knew nothing whatsoever about, especially something so expensive. It is not better to fail trying at this because fail trying could cost 800$ if it is screwed up, so again, you are wrong. Heart surgeons would practice for years before doing a procedure, but with your logic, you're saying they would go and blindly attempt a heart transplant on a patient knowing absolutely nothing about it. Smart idea.

Edited by Zuz500
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Like I said I have seen all of those links as well as the other 4 people that started threads on here and they provide no concrete diagrams or descriptions on what to do. Some people are visual learners. You can't just tell someone to twist a screw clockwise on top of the compartment in between the two rails beneath the fork assembly beside the shock inside and expect them to know what to do. In all my years of education I have never been told to go and blindly try and attempt something that I knew nothing whatsoever about, especially someone so expensive. It is not better to fail trying at this because fail trying could cost 800$ if it is screwed up, so again, you are wrong.

If you need it spelled out in black and white with pictures to be able to learn something, then put your hand in your pocket and buy a workshop manual.

Only thing I did wrong here was try an assist somebody with a defeatist attitude.

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Zuz. The only real external adjustments to the suspension is in the little slotted screw devices at the top and bottom of the fork. And on the side and bottom part of the shock. The shock has two threaded rings  wrapped around it to adjust spring preload. A special spanner wrench works the best  because if you use a long screwdriver or drive pin on it to move them you can cause them to go out of round and damage the threads of both parts. The science of springing and valving is very involved for the lay person. Trying to teach and show all that is involved over a blog is next to impossible. Even though I am a very capable wrench turner I leave some things to the experts. Ones who are well versed in their field. I used ProActionBob whom is a Pro-Action dealer/installer/mechanic. He is considered the top suspension person in our area here. Do you not have anyone in your area to turn to? I can understand your frustration over the lack of printed or visual knowledge on your specific bike and the answers you need. The mechanic at your local dealership should have a working knowledge of suspension that could help you. Talk to them face to face. Get him to explain to you. Tip him generously if he helps you. If not tip him a little bit and find someone who can. This internet forum is spread out world wide and throughout nations. Maybe with what info you gather and garner you can be the "one" to get the info down in a blog that can be of help and service to others here. PM some of the gurus here and kindly ask them for help with your specific questions.

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Telling someone that "they should get off the computer and look at their bike" or "stop procrastinating and do some research" isn't a positive way to assist someone, especially when I've looked for 2 months and know 3 other people with DRZ's that can't find a guide either, one being a licensed motorcycle mechanic. I guess you were never taught the diversity of learning styles in that not every person on God's green earth can do open heart surgery or adjust suspension on a motorcycle after reading a few paragraphs of someone explaining it.

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Zuz. The only real external adjustments to the suspension is in the little slotted screw devices at the top and bottom of the fork. And on the side and bottom part of the shock. The shock has two threaded rings  wrapped around it to adjust spring preload. A special spanner wrench works the best  because if you use a long screwdriver or drive pin on it to move them you can cause them to go out of round and damage the threads of both parts. The science of springing and valving is very involved for the lay person. Trying to teach and show all that is involved over a blog is next to impossible. Even though I am a very capable wrench turner I leave some things to the experts. Ones who are well versed in their field. I used ProActionBob whom is a Pro-Action dealer/installer/mechanic. He is considered the top suspension person in our area here. Do you not have anyone in your area to turn to? I can understand your frustration over the lack of printed or visual knowledge on your specific bike and the answers you need. The mechanic at your local dealership should have a working knowledge of suspension that could help you. Talk to them face to face. Get him to explain to you. Tip him generously if he helps you. If not tip him a little bit and find someone who can. This internet forum is spread out world wide and throughout nations. Maybe with what info you gather and garner you can be the "one" to get the info down in a blog that can be of help and service to others here. PM some of the gurus here and kindly ask them for help with your specific questions.

Thanks for the reply. I was just out using a screwdriver and hammer right now to try to tighten the spring preload but they wouldn't budge. That shock cylinder that looks like a metal bottle gets in the way a lot. Not much room to work in there. I guess a spanner wrench would work better so the thread won't be damaged, but more parts would have to be taken off, no?

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The pros do it with the shock in place. The bottom nut has to be loosened first as it is a lock nut for the one above it. The top one is then tightened/ moved up to add more preload. Manual sez do not set hard preload less than 247.5mm/9.74 inches. There are specifics of measuring and how to do it in the Suzuki "shop manual". All this of course depends on if the bike is sprung/weighted, valved to your size and needs. If you are over/under the weight standard that Suzuki has made the bike for all of it changes. I too can not find hard static and race sag measurements. I do know it depends on your weight and added gear. Bike measured without load and then with full load and adjusted from there. I wish you much luck getting what you need done. If you want PM your e-mail addy and I will scan and e-mail this page of info for you to see yourself.

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I called up my local Pro-Action guru Bob Genstch (the man who did my work) to try and get a measurement answer regarding static and race sag. Of course there is no easy answer but more like guide lines. He recommends once bike has been sprung for the weight of rider with gear. Then the static sag should be about 30mm. A range of 28-32mm there. He prefers 28mm for himself on his ride. He said using 31-32mm makes it handle worse in the corners. To tall. He said if you get the spring rate and static set right that when you go to measure the Race sag it will almost be close. He does recommend 100mm for the Race Sag setting. Oh and I quote of Bob. "Right spring equals right sag". Once again like I said the experts would set it up with you there and on/off the bike. The "clicker" settings are most usually set near stock reco's depending on a few factors of weight and ride type/ terrain. Valving is also very important. Once again product calculators are used to give the valving/stacking info and pistons too. Amount of preload, fork oil and the amount of it are all part of the equations in the end for most all suspension brands.

 

Long and short of it is as recommended to me is "30mm Static sag and 100mm Race sag". With proper spring rate for ladened bike. A range of 28 to 32mm of Static and 98mm to 110mm of Race is usuable depending on customer preference and or ride type/terrain condition set up. No need to call me out on this as this is all I can remember from our conversation and may be off a little on the race sag range. I am by no means an expert on suspension. Still a newb learning as I go.

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I must post a correction to my statement above about the shock adjusting ring nuts or whatever they are called technically...LOL!

 

I was not looking at the shock when I wrote about them. In my mind the preload adjusters were below the spring. NOT CORRECT. On the DR-Z the adjusters are above the spring towards the top of the installed shock. To adjust the spring pre load one of the two notched adjuster nuts needs to be backed off so to let loose the lock it causes on the other. On the DR-Z that would be the top one. Back it off a few threads to allow the lower one to be moved. Away from spring to release pre load. Toward the spring to increase the preload.

 

Sorry if I confused anyone...even if it was myself. :D

 

Oh and Suzuki recommends you compress it no more than 9.74 inches in lenght. The manual show how to measure it.

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