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I've recently started going to our local national level motocross track. I'm a woods racer, never rode motocross. First time out, first jump broke my ribs...yikes. Lucky it was just that but needed to win a woods championship so rode hurt, five races in and first in points so far. Anyhow i digress.

10 weeks later back at the track trying to get better air control, corner speed and overall confidence on the bike. There are two +/- 60' table tops that I always come up about 10' short and totally compress the suspension to nothing and generally slam my noggin into the bar pad. I'm landing both tires at about the same time, no gas. What's the proper landing technique for these types of landings? What's the proper landing technique in general? I know I just need to accelerate further up the face to make it but I'm still nervous of my air control.and chicken out at the base of the approach. Don't need another set of broken ribs. Those buggers are atill sore!

Edited by skidoorules_98

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I have a couples buddies that can't force themselves to stay on the throttle too.  I know you know the logic of "clear the entire jump" is the easiest / smoothest way to do it. But something in your head at the last minute says "no". At least that's my buds.  So in lieu of that, land with the throttle opening, using your rear wheel to absorb as much impact as possible.  I tell my buds to carry more speed on the approach so they don't need to accelerate up the face. Just hold a steady throttle all the way over.  It's a confidence thing. Experience of doing it over and over makes it the norm.  At some point you either take the leap of faith or you don't.  When I hit new jumps that I'm unsure of, I concentrate on what the bike does at take off. I can feel if something needs correcting faster than seeing it. 

Hope this helps...

Edited by Dirt Addict

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Dirt Addict is right and if you have a friend or another person on the track that is clearing those jumps, ask if you can pace them over it. Stay a few bike lengths behind but, try to match there soeex

Speed

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sounds like your bike needs some suspension work to start with, it's hard to jump properly w/ the suspension out of shape.

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As well as suspension set up, try and land at least half throttle when you land as it transfers your downward force into forward momentum making less impact on you as a rider

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I've recently started going to our local national level motocross track. I'm a woods racer, never rode motocross. First time out, first jump broke my ribs...yikes. Lucky it was just that but needed to win a woods championship so rode hurt, five races in and first in points so far. Anyhow i digress.

10 weeks later back at the track trying to get better air control, corner speed and overall confidence on the bike. There are two +/- 60' table tops that I always come up about 10' short and totally compress the suspension to nothing and generally slam my noggin into the bar pad. I'm landing both tires at about the same time, no gas. What's the proper landing technique for these types of landings? What's the proper landing technique in general? I know I just need to accelerate further up the face to make it but I'm still nervous of my air control.and chicken out at the base of the approach. Don't need another set of broken ribs. Those buggers are atill sore!

Landing on flat ground with both wheels at the same time is the worst way to land and with the throttle off makes it a lot worst. In order to get the landing right it's important to get the takeoff right. The most important part of the jump is where the bike actually leaves the ground, where you have the compression and rebound part of the jump.  What gives you control at this critical part of the jump is your body movements and throttle control.  Along with this body movement and throttle control is timing.  The timing is so critical that the body movement and throttle control has to be an automatic reflex reaction.  This is why it takes so much time and practice to learn to jump well.   Key into the compressing and rebound part of the jump, move your body back a little as the rear wheel kicks up and blip the throttle a little at the same time.  This will cause the front wheel to stay level or come up a little.  If the front wheel is too high don’t move back as much or give it as much throttle.  If you want the front end lower it’s just the opposite; don’t blip the throttle as much and don’t move back as much.  When you want to accelerate after the landing it’s best to land with the throttle on.

 

I have a fantastic how to Jumping DVD or Stream which covers in detail all the jumping techniques. It also shows how to break down these techniques so you can learn them separately. 

See a free preview and order the DVD or Stream online.  http://www.gsmxs.com/dvds/volume-3/dvd-6-motocross-basic-jumping-techniques

 

Vol 3 DVD 6 240.jpg
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sounds like your bike needs some suspension work to start with, it's hard to jump properly w/ the suspension out of shape.

My sag is lowest setting for woods riding. I know I need to bump this up.

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Landing on flat ground with both wheels at the same time is the worst way to land and with the throttle off makes it a lot worst. In order to get the landing right it's important to get the takeoff right. The most important part of the jump is where the bike actually leaves the ground, where you have the compression and rebound part of the jump. What gives you control at this critical part of the jump is your body movements and throttle control. Along with this body movement and throttle control is timing. The timing is so critical that the body movement and throttle control has to be an automatic reflex reaction. This is why it takes so much time and practice to learn to jump well. Key into the compressing and rebound part of the jump, move your body back a little as the rear wheel kicks up and blip the throttle a little at the same time. This will cause the front wheel to stay level or come up a little. If the front wheel is too high don’t move back as much or give it as much throttle. If you want the front end lower it’s just the opposite; don’t blip the throttle as much and don’t move back as much. When you want to accelerate after the landing it’s best to land with the throttle on.

I have a fantastic how to Jumping DVD or Stream which covers in detail all the jumping techniques. It also shows how to break down these techniques so you can learn them separately.

See a free preview and order the DVD or Stream online. http://www.gsmxs.com/dvds/volume-3/dvd-6-motocross-basic-jumping-techniques

thanks Gary! I'm learning air control slowly gas/brake but generally I stomp on the brake so working on that aspect of it. Going big is the hard part at this point but the landing is killing me so I only jump 75% at this point. Need that last 25% to get me over the last berm so to speak! Suspension work will help I m sure as well as learning proper technique. Edited by skidoorules_98

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My sag is lowest setting for woods riding. I know I need to bump this up.

 

 your compression settings and spring rating could be off too.

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Check your ego.  Just about everything you need to learn about jumping can be learned on a small (36"-42" tall) moderate (20-25 degree face) jump with a FLAT landing.  Getting too focused on "clearing" jumps is wrong.  You need to work on the right techniques...then go big.  Going big when because your ego drives you to, when you have no real concept of the subtlety of control needed is a recipe for disaster. 

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Sounds like your suspension is set up for woods riding and you're pushing yourself on this bike to clear MX jumps which clearly outclass you. If somebody else told you this and asked for your advice what would you say?

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No matter what suspension you have under you, if you case the jump by 10 feet, your suspension is going to compress and it's going to be a rough landing.

Give it some more gas and go farther :p

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Sounds like your suspension is set up for woods riding and you're pushing yourself on this bike to clear MX jumps which clearly outclass you. If somebody else told you this and asked for your advice what would you say?

Lol. I know reciept or disaster. How do you learn though without trying and coming up short a few (or a lot) time. Ultimately I'm trying to learn how to land properly on flat ground. I'm not casing the landing (straight into the face) I'm just landing on flat ground of the table top.

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try tagging onto someone's wheel who is clearing the jumps...you want to land on the transition

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Lol. I know reciept or disaster. How do you learn though without trying and coming up short a few (or a lot) time. Ultimately I'm trying to learn how to land properly on flat ground. I'm not casing the landing (straight into the face) I'm just landing on flat ground of the table top.

 

You learn by setting the bike right and pushing your limits one small step at a time. If you push it on too many fronts the risks will catch up with you eventually.

 

As others said the most important thing in slapdown landing is the rear wheel touching down first and being on the gas. The "on the gas" part will stiffen your rear suspension and let you bring down the front end softly (softer), kind of like coming down from a wheelie.

 

What others didn't say is if that slapdown is from a much larger jump than you're used to it will be much harder than you anticipate. As a result you're likely to misjudge your body position and lose control of your throttle when you get tossed around. The bike will likely wheelie out of control with you holding on for dear life, unable to shut down, and take you to the nearest tree.

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even with a really hard hit, it's not usually shorting the table top that bites you, it's the jumping off back to the ground where you loose it and go down hard. So if you really want to learn to flat land, there are safer ways to do it then on a table top. 

 

Hard landing technique is a pretty basic skill. You land to flat the same way you would downside a jump that didn't have a very good landing or a big drop. Technique is pretty much universal for hard hits: back wheel first, on the gas. You don't want the front wheel so high it slaps down, you probably want it so the front wheel is starting to compress as the rear is starting to bottom. Correct body position is pretty important for maintaining control. Along with throttle you want to use your legs to take the impact, the less you use your arms the better. This requires staying low and forward so then when you land on the gas, the bike wants to drive forward and you can get your weight supported by being pushed forward through your pegs, rather then pulled by your bars. It's a lot smoother.

 

I don't know what your off road areas are like, but i would look for anywhere with some low-ish vertical or near vert cliffs. You want them to have nice smooth trannys at the bottom, and then be nice and steep with a nice wide flat area on top to land on. It's really good for your bike control, you'll learn the body english to bring the bike level by the highest point, and then bring the front end back up slightly for landing. It's pretty safe, you can jump high with out a lot of speed. Plus it's a lot of fun.

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