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Getting tire installed at dealer

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The dealer where I bought my bike told me 45 bucks to change a tire. Is this worth it. I don't want to scratch up my anodized rim but I do have a tire stand and the tools. I've only helped people do it though, I've never done it myself. I'm putting the old tire on backwards anyway.

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The dealer where I bought my bike told me 45 bucks to change a tire. Is this worth it. I don't want to scratch up my anodized rim but I do have a tire stand and the tools. I've only helped people do it though, I've never done it myself. I'm putting the old tire on backwards anyway.

You need to learn to do it. It will likely be tough the first few times. Search, lots of good advice here and on YouTube.

Mike

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$45 is ridiculous! If you have the stand and tools just learn how.

Don't take to big of bites, make sure you barely put your tire tool in so you don't pinch a tube, and I like to use windex as a lube because it dries without leaving a residue.

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Tire changes are just one of those skills. The more you do, the better you get at it. You'll save yourself tons if you do it yourself.

Edited by RagingBunny
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Do them yourself. Tire changes are like oil and air filter changes, just part of the general maintenance routine. Besides, $45 is nuts for changing a tire, takes me about 30 minutes total for a new tire. One that has already been on the rim for a while is easier, use plenty of bead lube (I use RuGlyde) and it will pop off and on with no problems. I need to get a tire change stand some day, those look like it would make it a lot easier than on a bike stand crate or laying on the floor. :thinking:

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I've changes hundreds of tubes and or tires. Still don't like doing it!

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I'm not a fan of doing it either, but with decent tools and some elbow grease it saves money long term. Plenty of good videos on YouTube to help you out.

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This was another thing i did reluctantly and then realized its doable and not too hard.

+1 on windex

I also use baby powder for the tube.

Best trick is leaving the tire in the sun for 10 mins so each side. Makes it way easier but isnt necessary. That should keep you from cranking on it and slipping. They sell rim shields (never used them) for like $15 which sounds like it will pay for itself quickly. Good luck!

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$20 at the races, $10 if you haggle.

 

If you are worried about scratching the rim, try the new-fangled plastic tools.  I forget the brand, but RM has them.

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45 is worth it, i recently paid 112 for the rear tire, 50 for install, 25 for adjusting the chain slack

Next im getting works suspension settings, 65 bucks and the dealer will turn my clickers out to the same settings as trey canards bike

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45 is worth it, i recently paid 112 for the rear tire, 50 for install, 25 for adjusting the chain slack

Next im getting works suspension settings, 65 bucks and the dealer will turn my clickers out to the same settings as trey canards bike

lol and canards set up is ever changing so you need to pay them 65 everytime you ride but no low I got quoted 80 dollars to change the oil on my bike

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Do them yourself. Tire changes are like oil and air filter changes, just part of the general maintenance routine. Besides, $45 is nuts for changing a tire, takes me about 30 minutes total for a new tire. One that has already been on the rim for a while is easier, use plenty of bead lube (I use RuGlyde) and it will pop off and on with no problems. I need to get a tire change stand some day, those look like it would make it a lot easier than on a bike stand crate or laying on the floor. :thinking:

 

Don't wait, get yourself a stand it's worth the money.

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lol and canards set up is ever changing so you need to pay them 65 everytime you ride but no low I got quoted 80 dollars to change the oil on my bike

 

Wholly shit, what a rip off!!

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I find the more I have a dealership do, the more I should have done myself!

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I just use a 5 gal bucket for my tire changing stand and sit on a short stool. Changing tires yourself will be frustrating the first 2-3 times you do it, then you will get it and it will save you time and money each time you do it. Takes me about 30 min to change a tire and $0. It would take me about an hour and a half to take it to the dealer, wait for them to change it, then bring it back home (and that's if they aren't buys) plus about 10 min to put it back on the bike, plus $30.

 

Basically I save 70 min and $30 each time.

Edited by woods-rider

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45 is worth it, i recently paid 112 for the rear tire, 50 for install, 25 for adjusting the chain slack

Next im getting works suspension settings, 65 bucks and the dealer will turn my clickers out to the same settings as trey canards bike

Are they gonna hook you up with the geico graphics too? Sweet!!!

To the op, $45 is ridiculous!!! My local dealer charges $20. I'll gladly pay instead of doing that nonsense myself.

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I've always prided myself on doing all the repairs on my bikes (except machine work of course), and changing tires was one of those things. The last few times I've tried to change them, I was successful but at the expense of skinned knuckles, scratched rims, punctured inner-tubes, and broken beads on the tires. As time has gone on I've gotten worse at changing tires. The last time I tried to install a brand new Dunlop MX51 on my Excel Takasago rims (black) I spent 4 hours ATTEMPTING it. I scratched the heck out of my rims. Lost a lot of blood and had sore knuckles and mangy looking hands for several weeks. I punctured the inner tube multiple times.. Finally, I just threw it in the bed of my truck and drove it over to the local Honda shop. It took them 2 days to get it done, but it was only $25. I will NEVER EVER change my own tire again unless it has to be done to get out of the woods or some other situation that requires I do it.

 

Yes, I have a professional set of tire spoons (2 sets actually so I have 4 spoons). It's just not worth it to me to have to do that ever again. I will rebuild engines until I die, I build automotive transmissions for a living, but changing tires is far, far, far, beyond my pay-grade & patience level. If I had a 20 Ton press and a machine that could hold the rim while I press the tire on all the way around simultaneously I might try it again. Barring that-Honda get's my tire changing business.

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I find the more I have a dealership do, the more I should have done myself!

Amen!! I let the shop do something for me one time, and they messed that up!! I figure I can mess up my own stuff for free. I wouldnt let shops around here boil water for me lol.

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