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Piston Clearance Question for CW434 kit

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No, not according to the Suzuki manual.  Set up new is .0012 to .0016 inch, Very tight for a big 4 stroke with a forged piston.  Service limit is .005 inch.

 

A CW kit is going to be set up with more clearance as new.  Probably .002 to .003 inch.  I would use the Suzuki service limit of .005 as a guide.

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The last time I checked my piston to cylinder clearance it was .0023 or .05mm on my 434 bore

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On 7/26/2014 at 2:01 PM, Noble said:

No, not according to the Suzuki manual.  Set up new is .0012 to .0016 inch, Very tight for a big 4 stroke with a forged piston.  Service limit is .005 inch.

 

A CW kit is going to be set up with more clearance as new.  Probably .002 to .003 inch.  I would use the Suzuki service limit of .005 as a guide.

Sorry for the old bump folks, but is this expressed as "12 ten thousands of an inch" if you were speaking to a machinist? 

"12 thousands" in machinist lingo would be 0.012 yes?

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Yes.  .0012" is 12 ten thousands of an inch. Or sometimes 1.2 thousands. 12 thousands is .012".  Obviously written is more concise than verbal expression of decimal fractions.

Metric decimal fractions are written as zero point something as in 0.40mm. Where as inch decimal fractions do not use the zero in front of the decimal as in .005 inch.   0.005" is not wrong but as far as I know the preceding zero is not industry practice.  I mention this because all to frequently conversion from/to inch metric the decimal is misplaced because of the added or in some cases missing zero.

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9 minutes ago, Noble said:

Yes.  .0012" is 12 ten thousands of an inch. Or sometimes 1.2 thousands. 12 thousands is .012".  Obviously written is more concise than verbal expression of decimal fractions.

Metric decimal fractions are written as zero point something as in 0.40mm. Where as inch decimal fractions do not use the zero in front of the decimal as in .005 inch.   0.005" is not wrong but as far as I know the preceding zero is not industry practice.  I mention this because all to frequently conversion from/to inch metric the decimal is misplaced because of the added or in some cases missing zero.

That seems so tight for piston to wall clearance from what I've been reading. I'm trying to get my head around the whole thing. Most of the specs I read are more like 0.012-0.015" for example. Suzuki to put their spec in ten thousands with a 5 ten thousands variance is odd to see for me. 

Thanks for the late night fast reply. 

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Um
.. no......


It is not a 10 thousands of an inch....


THOUSANDTHS is correct. A machinist would know this though... but that TH at the end is important

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Posted (edited)
3 minutes ago, 74jimbo said:

Um
.. no......


It is not a 10 thousands of an inch....


THOUSANDTHS is correct. A machinist would know this though... but that TH at the end is important

There's an extra zero though. So I was wondering how you'd say it, 0.012 is simple, "Twelve thousands". 0.0012 I was unsure. 

How would you say that personally? 1.2 thou? 

Edited by Atolduso

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There is not an extra 0.

Once you start going to the right of the decimal point. There is no oneths


.012 is 12 thousandths


The first number to the right is tenths, the second number is hundredths, the third is thousandths, fourth would be ten thousandths, fifth would be hundred thousandths, etc

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Posted (edited)
3 minutes ago, 74jimbo said:

There is not an extra 0.

Once you start going to the right of the decimal point. There is no oneths


.012 is 12 thousandths


The first number to the right is tenths, the second number is hundredths, the third is thousandths, fourth would be ten thousandths, fifth would be hundred thousandths, etc

I know 0.012 is 12 thousands. I'm asking about 0.0012. Different number. My question was just about how'd you say that to a machine shop. 

Edited by Atolduso

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.0012 = twelve ten thousandths

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18 minutes ago, 74jimbo said:

Um
.. no......


It is not a 10 thousands of an inch....


THOUSANDTHS is correct. A machinist would know this though... but that TH at the end is important

1 minute ago, 74jimbo said:

.0012 = twelve ten thousandths

I thought that was determined but you said the above so I wasn't sure. :)

 

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I thought that was determined but you said the above so I wasn't sure.
 
I was using generic numbers in my posts. The numbers other people have posted in this thread are all over the place.

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Posted (edited)
3 minutes ago, 74jimbo said:
7 minutes ago, Atolduso said:
I thought that was determined but you said the above so I wasn't sure. emoji4.png
 

I was using generic numbers in my posts. The numbers other people have posted in this thread are all over the place.

I'm really confused, you misread Nobles reply post I think, no one was saying 0.0012 was ten thousands of an inch. Noble said "12 ten thousands". Which is right as you are also saying. 

Edited by Atolduso

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Most machinist would just say twelve tenths or 1.2 thou because it takes too long to say thousandths. Typically .xxxx" is spoken as X tenths. For example .0009" would be said as nine tenths. Go any smaller and they'll start speaking in microns. Working for a bearing manufacturer if I wanted to communicate a range of .0012"-.003" I would say the spec is 1.2 to 3 thousandths.

 

 

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Ya, I  tend to say one thousandth and 2 tenths, may be a local terminology thing. If talking to lesser experienced guys I prefer to point out in separate sections, if not physically written the number .

Edited by jjktmrider
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16 hours ago, Atolduso said:

"12 ten thousands of an inch" if you were speaking to a machinist?

"one and two tenths" in the vernacular

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