Trail Bikes for My Dad and Me

Hey guys. My dad and I are planning to get 2 trail bikes to take around Texas (mainly; we live here) and to Cali, New Mexico and possibly Nevada. We are NOT planning to do any motocross, I have a CR for that. Reliability and fuel injection are basically the only two stipulations. My dad absolutely does not want to mess with jetting. We are thinking either Honda, Yamaha or Husqvarna at this point, and 250's most likely. We will be buying new bikes from the dealer. We don't need them to be street legal, my dad has a thing about riding bikes on any type of road any time period- he just won't do it. Also don't want to deal with plating, etc. Anyway I'd love to hear opinions from those more experienced than us, so feel free to throw in anything. Thanks yall

Wr250f's?

Experience, age, skill???

WR 250

I'm 20 and have a good amount of experience. I used to have a YZ 450. My dad is 62 and has no experience on bikes, but I am confident he could pick up fairly quickly on a 250 4 stroke. Thanks for the replies guys, didn't know anybody replied until now. Could yall provide some insight as to why choose Yamaha? I know Yamis are great, but I'd like to know what yall think and why. Thanks again!

WR250.

WR250.

Why?

Why?

 Bulletproof, tame, reliable, wide ratio trans, lights, 250.

So the Yamaha is definitely a better choice than the Honda?

So the Yamaha is definitely a better choice than the Honda?

 

IMHO, yes.

Why do you think that is? Engine, suspension, both? I almost want to get a Yamaha and a Honda, cause I know they're both great bikes, and then my dad and I can ride them and then maybe we would have an opposite favorite. But we could always switch it up if we want.

From my experience, Hondas have more bottom end torque and Yamahas are more of a easy riding beginner machine. Between my old ttr125 and my xr100, the xr100 was snappy as hell. But the ttr125 still made it's way around. I don't have experience with Husqvarna but I'd stick with either Honda, Yamaha, Suzuki, Kawasaki, and even possibly KTM. I currently have a yz125 and the thing rips. But I hope this helps on your decision. Thanks!

-Colton

Why do you think that is? Engine, suspension, both? I almost want to get a Yamaha and a Honda, cause I know they're both great bikes, and then my dad and I can ride them and then maybe we would have an opposite favorite. But we could always switch it up if we want.

 

Engine is more bulletproof. Suspension is similar on both and leaves a lot to be desired.

 

In reality you will probably be happy with either as they are both great bikes for what you are looking for.

Edited by woods-rider

Thanks for the input again guys. Really appreciate it. And I think we will end up either going 2 Yamahas or a Honda and a Yamaha. I really like the idea of being able to switch up bikes. And from what I've read, Husqvarna motorcycle division got bought by KTM, and apparently the 2014/15 Huskies have KTM engines? I'm kinda weary of KTM engines, I think the aforementioned make more reliable motors from what I've heard, and I know you can't go wrong with red or blue.

KTM engines are known for their power. And too much power could lead to blown engines, reeds, etc. so if you get a Husqvarna or KTM just be careful.

KTM engines are known for their power. And too much power could lead to blown engines, reeds, etc. so if you get a Husqvarna or KTM just be careful.

But four strokes don't have reeds.. And do you know anything about the merger? Edited by 2strokeman12

I keep forgetting thread is about 4 strokes haha. I'm used to my 2 strokes

Why?

I think it's the only trail bike that meets your criteria. Specifically fuel injected, not street legal. Not sure if the CRF250L is going to work better as a trail bike than the WR and it's also street legal.

The 2015 Hondas should be fuel injected though.

The Rs are. The Xs remain unchanged for about a decade sans some minor updates. I still like my X though. I had it jetted once and haven't had a problem with the carb. I ride between 5000 to 10,000 feet. Usually around the 8500 mark. Although I did take it up American Flag Mountain once to 12,713 ft. Ran relatively good considering the HUGE elevation change, the lack of oxygen, and the steep grade. It's literally straight up. No switch backs. Just up the mountain. One of the easiest peaks to reach at it's elevation.

 

http://www.summitpost.org/american-flag-mountain/565108

 

He starts the final climb about 1:30. I'm not sure but I'd guess that from there he travels 2500-3000 vertical feet. That would mean he started right at 10,000 ft. That's quite an elevation change in under 3 minutes.

 

Edited by Colo.TJ

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