Wrenching on this bike is wearing me out

So I'm taking off the top and I'm at the point where the 4 long bolts come out of the head. They're not budging. I've tried with a good size breaker bar on the wrench but I've broken some tools without these bolts budging.

I'm going out shopping tomorrow so I can find something without a ratchet on it, but in case I have no luck - what can I do?

Use larger (or quality) tools?

 

The head bolts have less than 50ftlb of tq on them.. any standard 3/8 drive socket wrench should be capable of removing them without breaking.  Heck pretty sure I could remove them with my 1/4 drive stuff if I had to.

Use larger (or quality) tools?

 

The head bolts have less than 50ftlb of tq on them.. any standard 3/8 drive socket wrench should be capable of removing them without breaking.  Heck pretty sure I could remove them with my 1/4 drive stuff if I had to.

 

I broke a 1/4 ratchet first, then a 1/4 to 3/8 adapter, so the 1/4 stuff is too anemic for this bike. I think it was a Teng Tools ratchet, so middle of the road tool quality.

 

Going out tomorrow to look for some deep sockets so I can skip adapters, but it doesn't look this is going to be easy.

 

I had to use a breaker bar on the 10mm wrench to get the two sylinder head bolts (on the right side of the head) out, and after applying a lot of torque and some penetrating products they came loose with a loud snap. 

I broke a 1/4 ratchet first, then a 1/4 to 3/8 adapter, so the 1/4 stuff is too anemic for this bike. I think it was a Teng Tools ratchet, so middle of the road tool quality.

 

Going out tomorrow to look for some deep sockets so I can skip adapters, but it doesn't look this is going to be easy.

 

I had to use a breaker bar on the 10mm wrench to get the two sylinder head bolts (on the right side of the head) out, and after applying a lot of torque and some penetrating products they came loose with a loud snap. 

mate u need at least 3/8 drive for most car/bike maintenance 1/4 is only realy for delicate stuff

I broke a 1/4 ratchet first, then a 1/4 to 3/8 adapter, so the 1/4 stuff is too anemic for this bike. I think it was a Teng Tools ratchet, so middle of the road tool quality.

 

Going out tomorrow to look for some deep sockets so I can skip adapters, but it doesn't look this is going to be easy.

 

I had to use a breaker bar on the 10mm wrench to get the two sylinder head bolts (on the right side of the head) out, and after applying a lot of torque and some penetrating products they came loose with a loud snap. 

1st: Quality 1/4 drive tools are workable, but not the right tool for the job.. no idea what that brand you mentioned is.

2nd: 3/8 drive tools for the head bolts would be what is commonly used.

3rd: 1/4 drive adapters to use a larger than normal socket is a bad idea at best, but can work if all you are trying to do is turn an already loose fastener. Trying to break one free using that tool combination is a fast way to broken tools (as you found out)

 

 

None of the above is the tools fault, just a poor selection by the tool user.

 

Not sure what brand is common and quality in your country.  But do some asking around from professional mechanics, airplane A&P guys, or others that work in higher end repair shops and rely on their tools to work everyday. 

I always hear this argument when it comes to tools:

 

Don't buy cheap tools, they always ... (break, bend, bow, chip, wear, etc).

Followed by:

Go buy real tools like ... (Snap-On, Mac, blue point, $$$ tools).

 

I own some crap tools, princess auto wrenches in particular (canadian equivalent of harbor freight).

I've taken apart and rebuilt more vehicles with those wrenches then anything else.

I've only ever run into one occasion where I needed a half decent set of wrench.

I had to use the open end of a wrench on a fuel line. High torque on an open ended wrench = get a good wrench.

90% of wrenching is using the proper tool for the job.

 

Aka, don't use the open end when the box end will fit.

And don't use the box end wrench if the big socket and ratchet wrench will fit.

Get a good set of 6 point sockets. Less rounding off of nuts or bolt heads.

I always hear this argument when it comes to tools:

 

Don't buy cheap tools, they always ... (break, bend, bow, chip, wear, etc).

Followed by:

Go buy real tools like ... (Snap-On, Mac, blue point, $$$ tools).

 

I own some crap tools, princess auto wrenches in particular (canadian equivalent of harbor freight).

I've taken apart and rebuilt more vehicles with those wrenches then anything else.

I've only ever run into one occasion where I needed a half decent set of wrench.

I had to use the open end of a wrench on a fuel line. High torque on an open ended wrench = get a good wrench.

90% of wrenching is using the proper tool for the job.

 

Aka, don't use the open end when the box end will fit.

And don't use the box end wrench if the big socket and ratchet wrench will fit.

May I suggest you re- read what was posted?

 

No place at all was there tool snobbery like you suggest.

Perhaps you inferred too much based on previous observations???

 

Using a quality, correctly fitting tool designed for the job does not imply or demand you buy the tool from a tool truck. It simply states, use a quality, correctly fitting tool, of the type needed for the task at hand. 

 

That said, the cheapest of tools will rarely fit the same, have the same strength, leverage, pressure face toward the fastener as a better more expensive tool. This is not a guess or subjective, It is simply reality.

 

 Can you disassemble a motor with crap tools? Of course....will you damage, mar, round off more fasteners that way? YES, bust more knuckles? Yes... will you get accurate and consistent tq results using using a Harbor Freight Pittsburgh "Professional" tq wrench to tq down the cam cap screws as you will a quality inch lb tq wrench? Not likely. 

 

I'll happy suggest a better way, suggest the right tool, offer a helping hand,  remind folks its' cheaper and faster to pay to have something done right the first time, then fixed and repaired a second time.. But when they ignore that..and damage stuff, runion fasteners, brake off things..

I make money from fixing  folks well intended, ham fisted repair attempts. But Id rather they get it done right without the drama and added expense.

go to sears and buy a "breaker bar" in 3/8. if you are trying to expand your collection of tools get an air wrench. simple as that

go to sears and buy a "breaker bar" in 3/8. if you are trying to expand your collection of tools get an air wrench. simple as that

Good suggestion, but may not work out so well.

photo-thumb-366885.jpg?_r=1374692711
57 posts
Location: Norway

 

Tool purchase =$18.00

Round Trip plane ticket  =$2600.00

 

Not Having a Sears store in your country.... Priceless.

 

For all other things there is Internet purchases and free shipping

 

:lol:

I can go roundtrip Oslo - New York for $434... how much does a nice set of sockets cost at Sears?

I can go roundtrip Oslo - New York for $434... how much does a nice set of sockets cost at Sears?

Nice! :lol:  

If I can't find anything good tomorrow i might need someone to meet me at Newark

Your more likely to snap that bolt with a impact gun. Just sayin...

I would get a decent 3/8's, long handle swivel head ratchet at sears. There like $20 and plenty of leverage for what your doing

For the DIY mechanic a good set of craftsmen tools will do just about any jib you need it to! I've done work on my bike to removing a duramax engine and doing studs with just a middle of the road 300 piece tool set from them! Cost was like 200 bucks! But since you don't have a sears in Norway that might not work unless you can get it shipped there for decent!

I may have flown off the handle and read too far into what you typed.

I took the quoted sentence as "Quit using crap tools and go buy some real tools from Snap-On. Real tools pay for themselves".

Which probably pretty close to the answer you would get from professional mechanics and aircraft guys.

 

But do some asking around from professional mechanics, airplane A&P guys, or others that work in higher end repair shops and rely on their tools to work everyday. 

 

Middle of the road tools work well. Tools with lifetime warranty do as well.

I never use ratchet tools for loosening or tightening, especially not on Hi Torque applications, always the appropriate size breaker bar. 

Good tools cost a bit more but there an investment in the future, I still have Sidchrome tools that I purchased when I was kid, cost me a months wages, I also have some Gedore tools I inherited from father.

I may have flown off the handle and read too far into what you typed.

 

Ahh Ya... just a bit of adding your personal bias there ..lol

I took the quoted sentence as "Quit using crap tools and go buy some real tools from Snap-On. Real tools pay for themselves".

Wow, you got all that from what i said ??

Which probably pretty close to the answer you would get from professional mechanics and aircraft guys.

Vs asking some folks here that are pointing him to the same crap quality that got him to the failed position he is in now... Sounds like he needed a better quality group to ask .. 

 

Middle of the road tools work well. Tools with lifetime warranty do as well.

Absolutely... :thumbsup: 

point is, what he had, and what you suggested (Princess Auto) is bottom of the toilet, stuff.. NOT even close to middle of the road.  Do you have a middle of the road quality tool source for the OP?

:thumbsup:

sears is pretty much the equivalent of biltema here in norway. the 10 year warranty tools at biltema are bretty gud.

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now