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Making a ttr 250 street legal in Washington

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I live in spokane and have a 03 ttr 250 just had a kid so it's just been sitting in the garage collecting dust so I've been thinking about trying to make it street legal so I can actually get some use out of it and ride it to and from work iknow I need turn signals side mirrors ect but was wondering what else Washington state requires is there anyone on here that has converted a dirtbike to make it street legal in Washington any help would b great

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In Colorado there is a form to fill out then the bike can be inspected and a determination made if it complies to the street legal requirements. i would check with the highway patrol and  the dmv for such a document in your state. I do know that part of the requirements depend on the age and size of the bike. such as I had a 1970 SL125 and it was not required to have turn lights. 

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headlight, working taillight and blinkers, mirror.  not sure about horn.  can use gps for speedo.  the big kicker will be finding DOT tires.  you can get around some of these things if you have the right place certify it but if caught later, officer may not feel much pity.

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You can get a bicycle o universal speedometer  on ebay fo 10-20$. One thing you should consider is how much money and time you want put into it. I t could be worth it to sell it and buy something street legal.

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You need to comply with RCW46.61.705

 

It provides a list of equipment and links to the specific requirements.

 

http://app.leg.wa.gov/rcw/default.aspx?cite=46.61.705

 

You will see that there is no speedometer requirement.

That said, its handy to have one will riding on roads.

 

Concerning DOT tires for a TTR, consider a Dunlop 606 on the front and a Kenda Trackmaster in the rear.

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  you can get around some of these things if you have the right place certify it

 

And if a business is knowingly signing off on bikes that do not comply with the requirements, they are idiots and not acting in the best interest of the sport.

 

The conversion law requires infractions by people on converted bikes to be tracked and reported to the Legislature.

The anti-offroad motorcycle members of the Legislature will be happy to use proof of a trend of non-compliance as an excuse to repeal the law.

 

Also, if a converted bike is in a accident and found to non-compliant you can rest assured that lawyers will be crawling up the backside of whoever did the inspection. For this reason alone, some big dealerships have chosen to not do conversion inspections. Just not worth the liability exposure to them.

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And if a business is knowingly signing off on bikes that do not comply with the requirements, they are idiots and not acting in the best interest of the sport.

 

The conversion law requires infractions by people on converted bikes to be tracked and reported to the Legislature.

The anti-offroad motorcycle members of the Legislature will be happy to use proof of a trend of non-compliance as an excuse to repeal the law.

 

Also, if a converted bike is in a accident and found to non-compliant you can rest assured that lawyers will be crawling up the backside of whoever did the inspection. For this reason alone, some big dealerships have chosen to not do conversion inspections. Just not worth the liability exposure to them.

 

I don't disagree.... seems like it's not worth initial savings to go the short-cut route, but different stroke for different folks.

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