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Trailside Flat Repair

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Morning everyone,

 

Could have posted this in the general forum, but always enjoy talking to my fellow DRZ'ers.  Was riding yesterday offroad on very rocky terrain.  All went well, but was thinking if I flatted, what would I do.  I carry the tools necessary to actually pull my tires off of the bike as well as a patch kit, a small can of WD40 to lube the bead and a small pump.  My question was, how would I support the bike to actually get the tire off?  If I could find a downed tree or a large rock that I could get the bike over and have it rest on it, that might work.  But a downed tree/rock may not always be available or accessable.  It would seem very awkward to lay the bike on its side to do it.  Anybody have any other ides or Macgyver-isms that work to support the bike?

Thanks

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Morning everyone,

Could have posted this in the general forum, but always enjoy talking to my fellow DRZ'ers. Was riding yesterday offroad on very rocky terrain. All went well, but was thinking if I flatted, what would I do. I carry the tools necessary to actually pull my tires off of the bike as well as a patch kit, a small can of WD40 to lube the bead and a small pump. My question was, how would I support the bike to actually get the tire off? If I could find a downed tree or a large rock that I could get the bike over and have it rest on it, that might work. But a downed tree/rock may not always be available or accessable. It would seem very awkward to lay the bike on its side to do it. Anybody have any other ides or Macgyver-isms that work to support the bike?

Thanks

Tree , rock or stump as you considered is simplest after that the thee easy no tool idea is just what you said. Lay it over and get it done.

You can make a tool or second leg for the right side.. Leaning the bike up and over on the side stand then propping it up with your "tool"

Works to get the rear tire up and off and with a buddy to tile the bike back the front wheel as well.

The issue is.... It's another thing to carry and store on the bike....

I just find something trail side or lay it over personally

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That thing is awesome! Anything that can potentially make changing a flat easier is a + in my book

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I got mine in a round about way. I purchased a fender bag with tire changing tools in it from a fellow rider. Had 1 tire iron and two spoons all made of steel. A bead buddy, some baby powder and a couple of other things in it and one of them was the EnduroStar stand. Got the lot for $60. Did not know how much the stand was until I looked it up once the M2W thread popped up. Half of the label on it was gone so I did not know what brand it was.  Though I have not had to fix a tire off road yet I have used it to prop up the bike a few times doing work on her. The EnduroStar stand is steel but not to heavy. It is very sturdy for what it is. And I am glad I have one 'in the bag'. :D

 

I only carry one of the steel tire irons because I bought 2 of the MotionPro light weight tire spoons with wrenches built in. 12/13mm and a 24mm. A lot lighter and more useful than just steel spoons. I have an extensive off road tool bag. It is just to remote here to not have a good tool kit along with spare tubes and water.

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Thanks for the link and info on that stand Jim.  I also like the idea of having the tire spoons with the wrenches built in.  Have to look into those as well...anything to shave weight!  Where I ride, it is not super remote, there are people around, just not very close by.  But when you are on a rocky trail that has a steep cliff on your right, very thick boulder and tree filled woods on your left and a pretty rocky up hill in front and behind you, you defantely want to be able to "ride" out.  Otherwise its a long walk out, and then try to find and pay for someone to go back in with me and help push the bike out.  I at times ride alone.  So a tool kit is a must for me as well and I like the idea of that stand.  Been tryin to put a nice light weight kit together.

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Epic. I did what I could to keep weight down but it is hard to do so and not have a good kit. I use the Bridgestone Ultra tubes f/r in my tires. I carry regular tubes for spares. That saves weight. But some or most of the needed tools are steel so it adds up. I carry most of the OEM tools but have subsituted for better ones. I carry asst. sockets and a combo 1/4"-3/8" ratchet wrench, allen keys and asst. of other tools I feel I need. One of them being a small Slime compressor kit. Sized the tools to fit whats on bike and left out what does not fit a fastener. My off road bag adds some weight but not enough to affect anything ride wise. I carry this always off road. I too ride alone often so must have my own support. Also has come in very handy on group rides. We leave no one behind. On group rides we also make stern statements that all riders should be prepared with their own tools and patch kits and support stuff. Because sometimes we get split up or someone bails and goes home or a diff route. Everyone should be prepared.

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Thanks for the link and info on that stand Jim.  I also like the idea of having the tire spoons with the wrenches built in.  Have to look into those as well...anything to shave weight!  Where I ride, it is not super remote, there are people around, just not very close by.  But when you are on a rocky trail that has a steep cliff on your right, very thick boulder and tree filled woods on your left and a pretty rocky up hill in front and behind you, you defantely want to be able to "ride" out.  Otherwise its a long walk out, and then try to find and pay for someone to go back in with me and help push the bike out.  I at times ride alone.  So a tool kit is a must for me as well and I like the idea of that stand.  Been tryin to put a nice light weight kit together.

 

I recently bought a TuBliss system for the front tire. It's essentially a tube that hugs the inside of the rim and presses really hard against the outside which then pushes the tire walls against the rim with tremendous pressure.....you inflate it with at least 100lbs. This pretty much should eliminate pinch flats, but I also carry Slime for the tube. Worse case scenario, I can ride it out on a flat with what's in the inner tube.....kinda protrudes just past the rims edge.....probably hurt the tire if it's exceptionally rocky, but saves the walk out. So far I'm very happy with how it all works...... :D

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It is a bit of a pain but you can always lay the bike on its side to remove wheels.  I've done it.  Then I made a prop stand that fits in the rear axle.

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Good advice there Jim and Sig.  Knock on wood, I have yet to flat out on the trail.  And my thinking might be off, but I just carry a patch kit instead of spare tubes.  I know the front tube will work in both from and rear, but thats bulky and adds weight.  I usually bring spare tubes and leave them in the truck, figuring I HOPE to be able to patch the tire well enough to at least get me back to the truck, or maybe evan hold for the rest of the ride and put a new tube in when I get home.  I have glue and Park Tool glueless patches...with the hopes at least one of them will work.  Then just carry a mountain bike pump that works pretty good and is fairly light.  It is tough to keep weight down cause like you said Jim, most of the tools are steel.

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As you well know. Tubes age and crack. Getting a flat and pulling the tube out can add to damage unknowingly.  Pinch flats are usually a split in the tube. The spare tubes are for those kind of situations. The rocky terrain here is mostly sharp and angular. Often tubes get damaged more than a patch can fix. I do carry a good asst of patches. And i have the glue in a glass 2ml vial that is well protected. Those little metal tubes of glue just magically dry up before you get to use them. I use to carry a small hand pump. Just old and lazy and love the convience of a powered pump. Also good for moto camping and inflating my air mattress. ;)

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I did that about 2 months ago.. Ripping through some rough stuff in the Bradshaw mountains between phoenix and Prescott on a solo ride I got a pinch flat. I carry a spare tube with me and patches. There happened to be a perfect rock to set the bike on. I get a flat nearly every long ride I go on so I got tired of riding 30, 40, 50 miles on a flat.>_> the sharp rocks here in AZ are rough on a flat tire. I've destroyed more than my fair share of brand new tires from riding on them flat

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