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Battery draining when bike is off

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So, this is a strange one for me. It appears that my DRZ's battery is draining when the bike is just sitting and turned off. If the bike sits for a couple of weeks then I need to bump start it to get it running. Once it runs a bit the battery charges enough that I can turn it off and start it up again. After driving for several miles I can park the bike for about another week and still have it start, but more than that and I need to bump it again.

 

I've already done the free power mod, plus I'm also running a MOSFET RR. 

 

I know I could just leave it on a tender whenever it's not being used, but I'd rather find the cause of the problem than just treat the symptom. 

 

Any ideas?

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Yes have the battery load tested with a good digital Metronics meter, replace if bad or marginal 

If not already done do the "Free Power" mod.

Use a VOM to check your key off amperage draw

Use a battery tender when you store the bike for more than a week...  Small battery, S or SM have a small drain on battery to run the computer. And naturally self drain over time...

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It's a brand new Yuasa battery.

Free power mod already done.

Brand new does not mean serviceable and not faulty.it simply means its new to you.

It does not mean it was properly placed into service on a quality charger like a Christie or Optimate. vs ruined with a battery tender  (to low amperage and charge load / timeline) or car battery charger using too many amps.

I've seen many a good quality battery ruined by well meaning riders that don't understand a batterys . service life is greatly determined by how it is placed into service 

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So, this is a strange one for me. It appears that my DRZ's battery is draining when the bike is just sitting and turned off. If the bike sits for a couple of weeks then I need to bump start it to get it running. Once it runs a bit the battery charges enough that I can turn it off and start it up again. After driving for several miles I can park the bike for about another week and still have it start, but more than that and I need to bump it again.

 

I've already done the free power mod, plus I'm also running a MOSFET RR. 

 

I know I could just leave it on a tender whenever it's not being used, but I'd rather find the cause of the problem than just treat the symptom. 

 

Any ideas?

 

I'm having the same problem. I've been searching around a bit and am wondering if anybody has installed a switch to disconnect the computer while the bike is sitting?I thought about disconnecting the neg battery cable but thats kinda of a pain  to do all the time . Thoughts ?

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With the bike turned off, take off the positive battery terminal lead and put an ammeter across the battery terminal and the end of the positive battery cable.  It should not be drawing more than 1 milliamp (which is just powering the clock circuit for the display). 

-If it is more than 1mA you'll have to go through connector by connector while watching the ammeter to see which circuit is drawing current and leeching your battery dead. 

-If it is below 1mA, then your battery is most likely the problem.

 

When you say 'the computer', I'm assuming you mean the capacitive discharge ignition module (and not the display).  The CDI should not be receiving any current when the ignition switch is turned off.  The only things that are connected to the battery's positive terminal while the ignition switch is off (not powered now... just have a wired connection to them) are the regulator, the display, one of the contact pins on the starter relay, and the ignition switch.  if you are drawing more than the 1 milliamp, the first connector I would pull would be the one for the regulator and see if the current draw drops back to normal range.  If not, the next thing would be the connector for the display.  The other two options seem less likely to provide a return path to the battery.

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Ok ,Thanks for the info. I was referring to the display. I would like to be able to disconnect it while its sitting not being used. Just wondering if anyone has done something like this .

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I installed a simple battery disconnect switch.  Unfortunately I haven't ridden, or started, my bike in at least 3 months.  I knocked out my honey-do list for the day, so I figured I'd go for a quick ride.  I have a Shorai, but I don't keep it on a tender.  I flicked on the disconnect switch and the bike started up right away.

 

http://www.thumpertalk.com/topic/494054-what-did-you-do-to-your-drz-today/page-794#entry12422525

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Ok ,Thanks for the info. I was referring to the display. I would like to be able to disconnect it while its sitting not being used. Just wondering if anyone has done something like this .

The red wire feeding into the display is the one you would need to splice a switch into to do this, but I wouldn't recommend doing this.  If you happen to run the bike and forget to turn that switch back on, there are other circuits that will be affected by it. The battery disconnect switch as mentioned above would make more sense than doing this, although to me, you are just adding another point of potential failure unnecessarily.  To each his own.  

 

If you are going to let it sit for a long time I would just disconnect the battery if you are concerned about it.  You should be able to leave a bike sit over a couple seasons with a good battery and it should still kick over (unless where you are storing it gets exposed to extreme temps which seem to take a toll on the AGM batteries.)  If this is the case, I would bring the battery into a place where it would sit near room temp for storage and then place back in the bike. 

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The red wire feeding into the display is the one you would need to splice a switch into to do this, but I wouldn't recommend doing this.  If you happen to run the bike and forget to turn that switch back on, there are other circuits that will be affected by it. The battery disconnect switch as mentioned above would make more sense than doing this, although to me, you are just adding another point of potential failure unnecessarily.  To each his own.  

 

If you are going to let it sit for a long time I would just disconnect the battery if you are concerned about it.  You should be able to leave a bike sit over a couple seasons with a good battery and it should still kick over (unless where you are storing it gets exposed to extreme temps which seem to take a toll on the AGM batteries.)  If this is the case, I would bring the battery into a place where it would sit near room temp for storage and then place back in the bike. 

 

or I would get a trickle charger.......I put a pigtail from the battery and it hangs out just by the back fender area and I connect it after every ride......no biggie. Then it's ready and fully charged for the next ride. I've had this battery since I bought the bike back on 08' and it starts 1st time and never sounds weak when out on the trail starting......and they're cheap. jmo

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It has been found that 2mA is normal for the DRZ400S/SM. About 1 mA for the display keep alive and 1 Ma current leakage thru the RR.  That plus self discharge and a small capacity battery dues not leave very much reserve.  Ride often or a battery tender are the common answers to keep the battery happy.

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It has been found that 2mA is normal for the DRZ400S/SM. About 1 mA for the display keep alive and 1 Ma current leakage thru the RR.  That plus self discharge and a small capacity battery dues not leave very much reserve.  Ride often or a battery tender are the common answers to keep the battery happy.

 

Or use a Trailtech dash, which draws much less than the stock one. I can leave my bike sit for 2-3 weeks and still have a strong battery.

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Thanks for the info & tips. I use a battery tender now with a pigtail . I've been switching it between bikes & boats but I guess I should pick one up just for this bike .

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The toys I have that I keep in my shop over the winter where it's relatively warm have had the same batteries in them for years without any charger on them.  (heated shop).  This is the third year on my DR-Z's battery without using a battery tender on it.  I may ride once or twice on nice days through the winter, but that's about it.  Always fires right up.  And my 99 bombardier is still on it's original battery somehow.  Those Canadians know how to engineer an ATV. 

 

At work, we use AGM's in our remote electronic equipment that runs fiber optic and repeats long distance copper circuitry, and all those cabinets have one thing in common - either heated pads for the batteries or cabinet heaters that are thermostat controlled.  When those heat pads or heaters fail in the dead of winter, those batteries start failing even with a charging circuit attached.  Something to consider.

Edited by WesternMDMtnMan

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