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Spoke Question.

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Well, I checked my spokes before the race this past Sunday and tightened them up with a torque wrench, and I do not believe any were bent or broken. I raced a really rocky course yesterday in the C class race. During the A class race, a friend (with the same exact bike as me) pulled off in 1st with a flat. Feeling bad for him I took my wheel off and gave it to him to use. He finished the race, and took his bike home. I was at his house today tightening the spokes on the wheel, and noticed 2 bent spokes. I'm not sure if they were bent because of him or me, but that doesn't matter. 

I'll get a picture later, but they are in this order as if going around the rim; straight,bent,straight,bent. 

 

I was looking on rockymountain and I believe they want $3.00 a spoke individually? And they have 2 types of spoke, inside and outside. Are they different shapes or lengths? Do I need to order the right side? Or are all the spokes the same? 

 

spokes and prices.JPG

How do I replace a spoke? I never have done it before. 

Should I replace those 2 or all of them? No other spokes seem bent.

Will it warp the rim if I take the two spokes out and insert new ones, then torque them?

 

 

Thanks for any help. 

Seth Stud


 

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There have been some similar questions asked recently that are relevant to your problem. Here are the threads, if you read those many of your questions will be answered. 

 

http://www.thumpertalk.com/topic/1097746-broken-spoke-riding-trip-tomorrow/

http://www.thumpertalk.com/topic/1090427-anyone-use-a-crows-foot-for-spokes/?hl=+spoke%20+wrench

In a nutshell - You should be okay replacing only the damaged spokes. For the bent spokes to have happened your spokes have backed out and your wheel is no longer solid, using a torque wrench is probably a contributing factor. If you use the method of tapping on the spokes and listening to the pitch of the 'ping' then you should be able to tell if the tension on them all is fairly even. On the other hand using a torque wrench makes sure all the nipples are torqued to the same spec, but this is only good when the threads are brand new, uncorroded and undamaged. It is a bad measurement to rely on once the threads have wear and tear, corrosion and grit in them. You can use the torque wrench for building a wheel with new spokes and nipples. Use the sounding method to check and adjust your spokes each ride once the wheels have been used. 

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