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Ultimate Skid Plate

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I currently have a FlatLand skid plate on my 230F.

It has been working pretty well and has taken a few hits on tight rocky off-camber single track trails.

Installation wasn't as easy as it woulda/coulda/shoulda been due to the holes on the bottom not lining up with the mounting holes on the frame.  I had to modify the plate for the bolts to go in straight.

 

After running it for a bit, I woulda gone about designing it differently.

 

I would start with a piece of aluminum about the same thickness, maybe a little thicker.

12" wide by 22" long.

This would extend out past the cases and shifter/brake pedals.

Extend up in front to where the clutch cable loop on the frame is.

Back to where the shock mounts are.

 

I would also space it off of the frame so it wouldn't rub the paint off nor trap any mung and drool between it and the frame.

 

I'd use roughly the same radius bend.

Not sure if any welding would be necessary on the ends to protect the cases as it would extend out well past them.

 

I figure with it being wider, it would also protect the rider's feet and foot controls better. 

Extending higher up in front would keep more funk off of the engine.

Extending rearward would just help to make the entire bottom of the frame a skiddable surface, not only for rock protection but for high centering on downed trees etc.

 

Anybody here in the Aluminum fab business and could make me one?

The bending is something I'd need to have done as well as any welding.

I'd probably wanna drill my own holes unless I came up with an accurate template.

 

Anybody else interested in this big and manly of a skid plate?

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IMO the ultimate skid plate can protect the bikes goodies and be made out of something besides metal.  I don't like the noise increases with aluminum.  I also like a slim profile.  I buddy of mine had a metal skid on his YZ that reminded me of a backhoe scoop because it was wide and didn't conform to the shape of the motor. 

 

Hyde230Fleft.jpg

Edited by Harvo
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IMO the ultimate skid plate can protect the bikes goodies and be made out of something besides metal.  I don't like the noise increases with aluminum.  I also like a slim profile.  I buddy of mine had a metal skid on his YZ that reminded me of a backhoe scoop because it was wide and didn't conform to the shape of the motor. 

 

Hyde230Fleft.jpg

 

Why a narrow profile?  It's not like a wider skid plate is gonna get caught on anything your shifter, rear brake lever and footpegs won't.  Good pic showing the shifter sticking out.

Edited by MetricMuscle

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I'm gonna make a cardboard template today and see how it would all fit.

I'm still getting lotso mud on the front of the cylinder and head, even with my mad baller CRF450R front fender which extends lots further down than the OE 230F fender did.

 

It has been mentioned that an aluminum skid plate will resonate sound back up towards the rider. 

Do y'all think this would go away or be minimized if the skid plate were not in direct contact with the bottom frame rail?

My plan is to use some narrow rubber strips between the skid plate and frame, maybe even a rubber washer where the mounting bolts go too.  Not only to isolate the plate from the frame for noise reasons but to create a gap to prevent debris from collecting, the frame getting rubbed and removing paint which will promote rust, etc. 

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After probably damaging my hearing when first using my aftermarket thick aluminum skidplate (was having so much fun exploring a hard-to-reach riding area), I installed thick rubber strips (from vehicle floor mats) between plate and frame---still too much racket.  I then added thick rubber strips along the upper side of the right and left "wings" of skidplate, fastened with several black plastic license plate bolts/nuts----those metal "wings,"  having "loose" ends, otherwise transmit upward to the rider lots of the sound, and the rubber strips greatly reduce/dampen said sound.  Kinda Steampunk looking, but not too bad (I took care to install in measured way), and reduces noise significantly. 

Edited by BSAVictor

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After probably damaging my hearing when first using my aftermarket thick aluminum skidplate (was having so much fun exploring a hard-to-reach riding area), I installed thick rubber strips (from vehicle floor mats) between plate and frame---still too much racket.  I then added thick rubber strips along the upper side of the right and left "wings" of skidplate, fastened with several black plastic license plate bolts/nuts----those metal "wings,"  having "loose" ends, otherwise transmit upward to the rider lots of the sound, and the rubber strips greatly reduce/dampen said sound.  Kinda Steampunk looking, but not too bad (I took care to install in measured way), and reduces noise significantly. 

Would steel be better?

It could probably be thinner.

Maybe make just some skid rails that go under the frame rails for high center protection, more like an engine case saver bar than a plate.

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I prefer a wider skidplate than the plastic ones I've seen.  I just like the idea of something fending things off my engine side cases a bit more than the narrower plastic ones might....

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you can try undercoat or bed liner spray/roll on.... that might help to "deaden" some of the sound reflecting off the motor, as well as absorb some of the sound.

 

Jesse

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In the quest for the Ultimate Skid Plate, I was pondering today the possibility of using a thick piece of Delrin or UHMW or similar.

 

I'm not sure how I'd go about bending or welding or gluing it or if that is even possible.  I've worked with it in 3 dimensions, milled it, cut it, drilled it but haven't ever tried to bend it or score it so as to bend it like one would any other type of softer sheet material like wood.

 

If it was supported well I think it could work, wouldn't resonate, would more readily slide over stuff, etc.

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