Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  

Clearing Doubles or Triples. anything with gaps or landing downside

Recommended Posts

I have this problem that I am trying to get over  .  If there's a gap  like a double I have the hardest time trying to hit it . I think to myself if I come up short  it will ruin my day at the very least . With this mentality  I usually roll it or I DO end up short and take a beating  . On the other hand If its a table top or flat landing I  rev the bike and fly knowing I'm gonna hit flat  and ride out . This too takes a beating slamming on the ground  but I don't seem to have a problem with that . The other Problem I have is sticking that nose down to land smoothly  . I am able to clear some nice tabletops and doubles but having to put the front downward for a smooth landing doesn't sit well for me . I want too but something keeps me from doing so .

My question is , how do you look past the gap from take off to landing and how can I get comfortable landing where I'm supposed too .
 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How big is the gap? Is the takeoff comparable to the length of the total jump? Most people who know how to build a jump kinda match the takeoff with the jump distance... unless the jump absolutely intimidates me, I like to accelerate towards the jump like its not there. But before that step, I try to take the ramp a couple times working up to get a feel for the lift/loft/lip/kick so when I hit it at speed its not a huge surprise. A flatland is almost always a better option than a case.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

just stick with table tops and small doubles until you feel comfortable. no reason to force it

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have this problem that I am trying to get over  .  If there's a gap  like a double I have the hardest time trying to hit it . I think to myself if I come up short  it will ruin my day at the very least . With this mentality  I usually roll it or I DO end up short and take a beating  . On the other hand If its a table top or flat landing I  rev the bike and fly knowing I'm gonna hit flat  and ride out . This too takes a beating slamming on the ground  but I don't seem to have a problem with that . The other Problem I have is sticking that nose down to land smoothly  . I am able to clear some nice tabletops and doubles but having to put the front downward for a smooth landing doesn't sit well for me . I want too but something keeps me from doing so .

My question is , how do you look past the gap from take off to landing and how can I get comfortable landing where I'm supposed too .

 

 

I know where you are coming from.  Gaps are tough.  I will huck an 80 foot jump with a forgiving landing...but ask me to jump a 50' gap...and I can't do it.  Time and repetition = confidence.  If  you don't KNOW you have it...then you dont.  Simple as that.  You just have to keeping doing what we feel safe doing..over and over and over...the confidence will eventually come.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have this problem that I am trying to get over . If there's a gap like a double I have the hardest time trying to hit it . I think to myself if I come up short it will ruin my day at the very least . With this mentality I usually roll it or I DO end up short and take a beating . On the other hand If its a table top or flat landing I rev the bike and fly knowing I'm gonna hit flat and ride out . This too takes a beating slamming on the ground but I don't seem to have a problem with that . The other Problem I have is sticking that nose down to land smoothly . I am able to clear some nice tabletops and doubles but having to put the front downward for a smooth landing doesn't sit well for me . I want too but something keeps me from doing so .

My question is , how do you look past the gap from take off to landing and how can I get comfortable landing where I'm supposed too .

just YOLO it that's what I did lol

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How big is the gap? Is the takeoff comparable to the length of the total jump? Most people who know how to build a jump kinda match the takeoff with the jump distance... unless the jump absolutely intimidates me, I like to accelerate towards the jump like its not there. But before that step, I try to take the ramp a couple times working up to get a feel for the lift/loft/lip/kick so when I hit it at speed its not a huge surprise. A flatland is almost always a better option than a case.

To answer the first Q is that its not any ONE gap particular but the deeper the gap the harder it is for me to wrap my head around .

The are a couple doubles I'd like to hit at this open space I ride at . the friends I ride with  Say I could jump it no problem .   they are A class racers and I am D class but they Have seen the jumps I do take and believe it would be no sweat for me to take these certain ones I have my eye on . problem is though that they have short soaring face that lifts you 15'-20' high  easy and coming up short will hurt badly . If by chance I have the mind frame of where I want to land and not get intimidated by the face of a jump I do pretty well  but that's not often I do so .

just stick with table tops and small doubles until you feel comfortable. no reason to force it

I hear ya and for the most part that's what I do but I get frustrated  and feel That I am keeping my self in a cage . know what I mean ?

 

 

I know where you are coming from.  Gaps are tough.  I will huck an 80 foot jump with a forgiving landing...but ask me to jump a 50' gap...and I can't do it.  Time and repetition = confidence.  If  you don't KNOW you have it...then you dont.  Simple as that.  You just have to keeping doing what we feel safe doing..over and over and over...the confidence will eventually come.

Right?!

 

just YOLO it that's what I did lol

 LOL . gotta ya!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You could have one of your A rider friends ride in front of you so you can match their speed coming off the jump. Just make sure you tell them they have to do it at a steady speed, they can't fly up to it and let off or blip the throttle on the lip or you won't be able to see how fast they are actually hitting it very easily.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know exactly what you mean. This weekend was my first ever time at the track and i brought a 250. There was this 40 foot double that launched you about 15 20 feet high and i was terrified to do it but i just rolled it a couple of times and followed some A class riders. Finally i just hit it and what do you know first time cleared perfect and after that one time i could hit it every time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You mainly have to just get a feel for the face of the jump and when you figure out what kind of trajectory it gives you you'll figure out the correct speed to hit it. I'm not a fan of hitting jump a for the first time, but when you hit it perfect for the first time it's a great feeling.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah after you check the jump out a little its almost an instinct how you need to hit it, and you're right it is a great feeling especially you're first time at a track

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just posted this in another thread the other day. I'm posting it again because it fits your question. The first time you hit a big jump, how do you know how fast to hit it? I've been asked this question hundreds of times. The best rider I've known at doing this is Kevin Windham. You've probably seen him doing hugh SX transfers on the TV during the opening ceremonies. Kevin can calculate a big jump so well that he always hits his landing target within a foot. He does it the same way any pro does it, he's just better at it. He's better at the calculations in his mind's eye. He can perceive exactly how the jump is going to through the bike, how high and how far. Then he calculates and perceives how hard he'll have to hit the jump in order to land on target. I say how "hard" he'll have to "hit" the jump instead of how fast. Sure the speed is important but there's a lot more to it that just speed. The speed has to be close but the techniques used when hitting the jump, when going through the compression and rebound parts of the jump are just as critical.

 

These different techniques are shown and explained in detail along with how to begin learning these critical jumping techniques in my Volume 3 DVDs 6 and 7 (Motocross Basic Jumping Techniques) http://www.gsmxs.com/dvds/volume-3/dvd-6-motocross-basic-jumping-techniques and (Motocross Seat Bouncing and Launching Techniques)  http://www.gsmxs.com/dvds/volume-3/vo3-dvd-7-motocross-absorb-scrub-whip-jumping-techniques . In short Kevin carries the correct speed into the jump, then he precisely times his body weight into the compression part of the jump. At the same time he hits the precise amount of power with the clutch and throttle. That's the compression part. Now for the rebound. As the bike begins to rebound he springs his body weight out of the footpegs, while remaining on the power. The next millisecond requires Kevin to catch his body's balance with the proper body movements in order to maintain the center of balance and keep the angle (front end neutral and straight or into a whip for extra eye candy) during this time he also backs off the throttle. By this time he has seen his landing target and knows he hit another home run, making the entire process look seamless and easy.

 

In this video Zach Osborne pulls the trigger on a big quad in a SX rhyme section. I know it looks like a triple with a tabletop at the end but in pro SX language it's called a quad. Here Zach is using the Seat Bouncing technique in order to get even more height and distance. Zach's on his modified Geico Honda 250F practice bike.

 

This is a dangerous jump because the landing has to be hit just right. If he would come up short changes are his feet would get bucked off the pegs, causing him to get spit off the bike as he hits the next jump. I promise if you rode through this rhyme section you would think "There is NO freaken way".

 

 

I have a lot more riding tips in my TT Blogs. When you open a blog you can join it by clicking (Follow this blog) in the upper right corner. This way you'll be notified when I post new blogs. http://www.thumpertalk.com/blog/4-gary-semics-motocross-schools/

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...