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What should I change so 4 stroke won't grenade?

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Hey TT, I am thinking of getting a 2001-2002 yz250f (for green sticker reasons) I am only 14 so I have to save money to buy a bigger bike. I don't want to have it grenade right after I get it. So I was wondering what things I should check/change. I was thinking maybe top end, cam chain, checking if valves are in spec and shimming as needed, I was wondering if I am missing anything.

-josh

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I would rather have a 4 stroke, but don't get me wrong, I would buy a 2 stroke I would just rather get a 4 stroke.

-josh

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I think a 125 2t would be a valid option but no one I ride with has a 2 stroke so I would be the only one.

I'd find new riding buddies :lol:

I'm major biased because I am a 2 stroke guy. Get the 125 and have a blast.

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Check your valve clearances and see how that looks. If in spec, then you could be good with not doing any valve train work right now, but if you have valves out of spec, you may want to get the head rebuilt.  If you don't know how many hours are on the piston, then changing that is a good idea, do the timing chain while your at it.  Its tough to say with a bike that old.  It could have been ridden in the low rpms all its life, and everything could still be in great shape.  Or it could have been bouncing off the rev limiter for countless hours, and everything in the motor could be knocking on deaths door.  You need to be careful with buying used.  Even if you only pay $1500 for a bike, a modern 4 stroke can require that much for a rebuild, and you can find brand new YZ250F's at the dealership for $5300 right now.  Also, does the bike start easily?  A bike that is hard to start can be an indication of a worn out engine. 

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"A bike that is hard to start can be an indication of a worn out engine."

 

This is excellent advice. A bike can be in good shape and still be hard to start, but it's rare to find one in bad shape that starts easily. Another short cut way to evaluate a bike is to look at the owners garage. Clean and orderly usually means he/she takes care of their equipment. Also check the air filter. If it's dirty run!
 

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