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Broke my bike on day 1... New rider in need of tips.

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Title says it all. I bought a 1990 Yamaha RT100 yesterday (Monday) for $400. The owner had the title and had it tuned up, had the front forks re-oiled and sealed, and cleaned carburetor. Bike started up with two kicks after sitting weeks on end when I originally looked at it. Needless to say and for only $400, this was a steal.

It is a bit small in size for me, I am roughly 6' and 195lbs but can ride comfortably. The bike handles great and has more than enough kick for me at the current moment: I've basically whiskey throttled it a couple times and have spilled the bike several other times launching me from the bike and making me barrel roll on the ground into bushes, trees and rocks (don't worry, I walked away with just have nicks and something that is going to be a bruise in a day or two).

Well like I said, I bought the bike Monday and today (Tuesday) was not only first trail ride but my first motorcycle ride overall. During one of my spills, I would up breaking the clutch lever at the hinge(?). It sucked because the trail we were riding was not truck accessible, so my friend couldn't just race back to his house (1-2 miles away) and grab his truck, but I found out the if I coasted the bike downhill in neutral and kicked it into first, I could bump start and shift without the clutch.

That being said all of my adrenaline has long filtered through my system and I'm pretty sure I do not have any broken/sprained/dislocated ankles, wrists, legs, arms, etc. but my right leg is pretty sore from wiping out and becoming a bowling ball so many times. I may have broke my clutch lever, but it's only $15 and then I'll be hitting the trails again.

Loved my first time riding and I'd say I'm hooked.

_____

Now the advice I am looking for is:

1) I am planning on getting at least a lever/hand guard for the clutch so this doesn't happen again, but would it would be ideal to get one for the brake lever as well. What are some cheap (less than $100) PAIR of guards that are decent quality?

2) any generic advice for a beginner rider on how to prevent spills, help with hill climbs, etc?

3) the bike's suspension supports my weight very well and hardly drops when I sit on the bike, but the front wheel will bottom out into the fender when I'm taking multiple bumps. Any ideas on ways to prevent the front from bottoming out? (I.E. Replacing shocks/springs with beefier ones)

_____

Also, for those of you in Eastern Washington or Idaho, would any of you care to share where some decent trails that a 100cc two stroke can handle are?

ImageUploadedByThumper Talk1407304865.303539.jpg

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I don't think you have the right bike for you, but it's probably ok to learn and play on.

1)Don't think I'd bother.

2)With a dirt bike, you will crash. If you don't have an experienced buddy to help you out, you need some time on the bike to ask specific questions on what's going wrong and how to correct it.

3)Suspension work will cost more, probably much more than you have into the bike.

I'd try it out for a month, have some fun, sell it and get something bigger.

Good luck and have fun!

Mike

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Great advice above.

 

You are a full size adult with a little kid's play bike. It doesn't fit you on several aspects and can't really be made to. I'm quite sure that some of your falls can be attributed to this fact alone.

Best advice, sell it soon. If it's a nice little bike right now you can bet it won't be after you have crashed it another hundred times.

Get your money back and buy a full sized four stroke beginner bike like an XR250- you can get a nice one for $1000 to $1500 depending on where you live. 

 

Then get on this site on the 'offroad riding technique' page and ask questions, watch technique videos on youtube, buy some videos on how to ride or hire a riding coach. There is a proper form to use and it must be learned. Until you do, riding won't be fun and you'll spend a lot of time on your face.

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I don't want a four stroke and I won't have $1000+ any time soon. Similar bikes to my RT100 are going for about $600-$800 in my area, so it still won't be enough.

Yes, the bike is short for my height, but it functions like it should. My friend who is a little taller than me agreed that it would a great bike to begin on and he has been in motocross for at least 8 years.

The crashes I've had are not from it being a too small of bike, they were from user error: locking up the front brakes and not knowing the tractional difference between dirt and sand.

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Flagstaff had good advice, I suggest you follow it. That bike is way too small for you.. don't bother wasting time throwing money into it. Now that you know you want to really ride a dirt bike.. get one fit for you

If you don't like 4 strokes - XR250 is perfect starter bike- go find an older YZ250 that has been set up for trails. If you don't have the money for the bike you won't have enough for maintenance, so start saving.

 

Read through the threads in this section.. you will learn a ton.

 

-Always keep one finger on each lever. ALWAYS.

-Always keep your body in preparation for throttle/braking and turning. You should be able to ride one handed most of the time (don't rely on the bars to keep you on the bike).

-Know your foot placement and be ready to use the rear brake controllably

 

I picked this 1988 CR250 up for $800 and rode one of the harder trails in eastern WA to get here on it-

threebropano.jpg

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Nice picture!

 

Is that a stove in the background?  Strange how stuff gets in the most remote areas.

 

BTW an RT100 is a bike for a kid or a woman to learn on.

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Here is a little video I made for Beginning Trials Riders.  Some of the lever position and cable routing will apply to everyone but the angle of the handle bar risers is aimed at the Trials Bike and it's special bend.  However, changing this angle on any bike can make or break your riding experience.  Let someone with advanced experience check the handlebar angle for you.  They are often set wrong.  With that in mind, see if this video helps at all:

http://vimeo.com/27105685

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I don't want a four stroke and I won't have $1000+ any time soon. Similar bikes to my RT100 are going for about $600-$800 in my area, so it still won't be enough.

If you are on a tight budget...save your money & look to buy in the "off season"...I find the best "deals" from October thru Christmas. It is likely you'll need to factor in...a topend, brakes, tires, and paperwork(if 2ts are your thing). That's the common big stuff. If your lucky, you'll get most or all the trail armor with said purchased bike. The best money you'll ever spend on a bike...suspension work.

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Don't waste your money re-working the suspension on that RT100 you are a full sized guy on a learner bike... the suspension will cost more than the value of the bike to get working 'properly'.  It was only 400 bucks, so beat it up and learn throttle control and body positioning.  This means you probably should NOT be hitting big 'bumps' or doing any jumps on it as you are gonna break something pretty quick (maybe even the frame). Learning how to ride at 'slow' speed is crucial to not destroying your body when you are going faster.  Youtube "motorcycle trials"  (trIAls not trAils).... see how "learning to ride/control" the bike, even at slower speeds, will make you a way better rider.

 

Put some hand-guards/bark-busters on it (check ebay/craigslist and you should get some aluminum ones for $40 - $60). If the tires are old/worn/garbage you will get frustrated with lack of grip when your hill-climbing etc.

Don't expect to get your money back on that $400 if you ride it for a while.  Keep it as a buddy bike when you have moved up to a 'proper' sized bike.  Learn to maintain it as these skills will help you buy the next bike as well as keeping all your bikes working (obviously).

 

As mentioned "off season" purchases are a good idea.

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Title says it all. I bought a 1990 Yamaha RT100 yesterday (Monday) for $400. The owner had the title and had it tuned up, had the front forks re-oiled and sealed, and cleaned carburetor. Bike started up with two kicks after sitting weeks on end when I originally looked at it. Needless to say and for only $400, this was a steal.

It is a bit small in size for me, I am roughly 6' and 195lbs but can ride comfortably. The bike handles great and has more than enough kick for me at the current moment: I've basically whiskey throttled it a couple times and have spilled the bike several other times launching me from the bike and making me barrel roll on the ground into bushes, trees and rocks (don't worry, I walked away with just have nicks and something that is going to be a bruise in a day or two).

Well like I said, I bought the bike Monday and today (Tuesday) was not only first trail ride but my first motorcycle ride overall. During one of my spills, I would up breaking the clutch lever at the hinge(?). It sucked because the trail we were riding was not truck accessible, so my friend couldn't just race back to his house (1-2 miles away) and grab his truck, but I found out the if I coasted the bike downhill in neutral and kicked it into first, I could bump start and shift without the clutch.

That being said all of my adrenaline has long filtered through my system and I'm pretty sure I do not have any broken/sprained/dislocated ankles, wrists, legs, arms, etc. but my right leg is pretty sore from wiping out and becoming a bowling ball so many times. I may have broke my clutch lever, but it's only $15 and then I'll be hitting the trails again.

Loved my first time riding and I'd say I'm hooked.

_____

Now the advice I am looking for is:

1) I am planning on getting at least a lever/hand guard for the clutch so this doesn't happen again, but would it would be ideal to get one for the brake lever as well. What are some cheap (less than $100) PAIR of guards that are decent quality?

2) any generic advice for a beginner rider on how to prevent spills, help with hill climbs, etc?

3) the bike's suspension supports my weight very well and hardly drops when I sit on the bike, but the front wheel will bottom out into the fender when I'm taking multiple bumps. Any ideas on ways to prevent the front from bottoming out? (I.E. Replacing shocks/springs with beefier ones)

_____

Also, for those of you in Eastern Washington or Idaho, would any of you care to share where some decent trails that a 100cc two stroke can handle are?

attachicon.gifImageUploadedByThumper Talk1407304865.303539.jpg

dont know if that model is a 100 2t or 4t... If a 100 4 stroke throws you off and you whiskey throttle it, you probably should not be riding dirt bikes until you know how to properly take off, clutch work, etc. if its a 100 2 stroke, thats a little more understandable for a newbie but still... A 100 2 stroke is nothing for me.

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Great advice above.

You are a full size adult with a little kid's play bike. It doesn't fit you on several aspects and can't really be made to. I'm quite sure that some of your falls can be attributed to this fact alone.

Best advice, sell it soon. If it's a nice little bike right now you can bet it won't be after you have crashed it another hundred times.

Get your money back and buy a full sized four stroke beginner bike like an XR250- you can get a nice one for $1000 to $1500 depending on where you live.

Then get on this site on the 'offroad riding technique' page and ask questions, watch technique videos on youtube, buy some videos on how to ride or hire a riding coach. There is a proper form to use and it must be learned. Until you do, riding won't be fun and you'll spend a lot of time on your face.

well hes kindof In a situation here. The 100 2t he has scares him by whiskey throttle, getting thrown off, etc. a bigger bike would really scare the shit out of him and hurt him. IMHO get a WR250F. Less jumpy but has the possibility to hit low 90's but its a great trail and beginners bike although its a 4 stroke. Plus I realize the 100 is a 2 stroke. I have the habit of not reading all the way through till i post :). Also! Help with hill climbs. Since youre on a very small bore 2 stroke. You're going to need to hit it hard. And I mean HARD! If they're big hills like down in kentucky you need to be on the pipe ALL THE TIME! Imo for beginner trail riders id get a 4 stroke! :)
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I don't want a four stroke and I won't have $1000+ any time soon. Similar bikes to my RT100 are going for about $600-$800 in my area, so it still won't be enough.

Yes, the bike is short for my height, but it functions like it should. My friend who is a little taller than me agreed that it would a great bike to begin on and he has been in motocross for at least 8 years.

The crashes I've had are not from it being a too small of bike, they were from user error: locking up the front brakes and not knowing the tractional difference between dirt and sand.

well 1. Your friend is a tard. And 2. Your friend is a tard. A 100 2 stroke is not suitable for a guy 6 foot. Im 5'8 and handle full sized bikes well. That 100 2 stroke is tiny. And GET A 4 STROKE! Don't get me wrong, I love 2 strokes but they just aren't beginner bikes... They don't make beginner 2 strokes whereas 4 strokes have the XR250 or the TT-R230/CRF230F which suit beginners great! And also teach them how to ride. The XR250 is full sized but the 230's have near the same power and gobs of torque for hill climbs. But theyre a few inches lower! And spend the money. Get a loan, or your parents to help you out, or a loan from your parents! Either way to get ANY good bike you need to spend 1k+ easily.
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When you crash find out why you crashed and don't make the same mistakes. That's how I learned what works and what doesn't. My bike is also "to small" for me (I'm 6'8) but it's a heck of a lot of fun riding it.

haha i think any bike is "too small" for you! :D

Flagstaff had good advice, I suggest you follow it. That bike is way too small for you.. don't bother wasting time throwing money into it. Now that you know you want to really ride a dirt bike.. get one fit for you

If you don't like 4 strokes - XR250 is perfect starter bike- go find an older YZ250 that has been set up for trails. If you don't have the money for the bike you won't have enough for maintenance, so start saving.

Read through the threads in this section.. you will learn a ton.

-Always keep one finger on each lever. ALWAYS.

-Always keep your body in preparation for throttle/braking and turning. You should be able to ride one handed most of the time (don't rely on the bars to keep you on the bike).

-Know your foot placement and be ready to use the rear brake controllably

I picked this 1988 CR250 up for $800 and rode one of the harder trails in eastern WA to get here on it-

threebropano.jpg

are you trying to kill him? Even a de-tuned YZ250 would KILL him!

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haha i think any bike is "too small" for you! :D

are you trying to kill him? Even a de-tuned YZ250 would KILL him!

 

just accelerating natural selection

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dont know if that model is a 100 2t or 4t... If a 100 4 stroke throws you off and you whiskey throttle it, you probably should not be riding dirt bikes until you know how to properly take off, clutch work, etc. if its a 100 2 stroke, thats a little more understandable for a newbie but still... A 100 2 stroke is nothing for me.

If I said I don't want a 4 stroke, why would I get 4 stroke to begin with?

well hes kindof In a situation here. The 100 2t he has scares him by whiskey throttle, getting thrown off, etc.

I never once said that the whiskey throttle scared me, so thanks for taking everything out of context. I tried climbing a hill that was a little too steep for my first ride all together. The front end began lifting off the ground, I slid back a little bit and yanked the throttle because so. When the front end began lifting even higher I said f*** this and "jumped" off because I didn't want to get crushed. Even a small bike 100 2t can kill if it lands on someone in the right spot.

well 1. Your friend is a tard. And 2. Your friend is a tard.

If I meet you face to face, I would punch you in the throat for saying that.

A 100 2 stroke is not suitable for a guy 6 foot. Im 5'8 and handle full sized bikes well. That 100 2 stroke is tiny. And GET A 4 STROKE! Don't get me wrong, I love 2 strokes but they just aren't beginner bikes. And spend the money. Get a loan, or your parents to help you out, or a loan from your parents! Either way to get ANY good bike you need to spend 1k+ easily.

A) Yes, the 100 may not be suitable for a guy my size but like I said, it functions, and that is a-okay for me right now. B) I already said that I don't want a 4 stroke, since apparently you did not get the memo the first time: I do not want a four stroke. They may not make dedicated beginner 2ts, but even if I were to start on an older IT200 or even 250, it's called "don't be stupid. C) I know a "good" bike will easily set me back $1k+, I just don't have the funds and neither do my parents. I don't have any credit thanks to just turning 18, so I would need a cosigner, and with my dad's credit score, they probably won't even acknowledge his cosign. Even if I were to get a loan, how would I pay it off without a steady income? Once I get a job, I will have AT LEAST $800 every pay check (every other week), so then it will be a different story.

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If I said I don't want a 4 stroke, why would I get 4 stroke to begin with?

I never once said that the whiskey throttle scared me, so thanks for taking everything out of context. I tried climbing a hill that was a little too steep for my first ride all together. The front end began lifting off the ground, I slid back a little bit and yanked the throttle because so. When the front end began lifting even higher I said f*** this and "jumped" off because I didn't want to get crushed. Even a small bike 100 2t can kill if it lands on someone in the right spot.

If I meet you face to face, I would punch you in the throat for saying that.

A) Yes, the 100 may not be suitable for a guy my size but like I said, it functions, and that is a-okay for me right now. B) I already said that I don't want a 4 stroke, since apparently you did not get the memo the first time: I do not want a four stroke. They may not make dedicated beginner 2ts, but even if I were to start on an older IT200 or even 250, it's called "don't be stupid. C) I know a "good" bike will easily set me back $1k+, I just don't have the funds and neither do my parents. I don't have any credit thanks to just turning 18, so I would need a cosigner, and with my dad's credit score, they probably won't even acknowledge his cosign. Even if I were to get a loan, how would I pay it off without a steady income? Once I get a job, I will have AT LEAST $800 every pay check (every other week), so then it will be a different story.

I would dare you to try and punch me, I'd give you money to try and punch me! Asshat. And if your friend says a 2t is a good beginner bike for a guy your size then I hold the right to say what I did.

:edit: you aren't going to get anything without a job there bud.

Edited by YZF_MX_rider
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