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Outside foot pressure in corners

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Is that necessary in every type of corners.? Or only off cambers? Because some people say is necessary and others not. For example I did a ride day with Timmy Ferry and he said is work, and Seb Tortelli have different opinion.

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Is that necessary in every type of corners.? Or only off cambers? Because some people say is necessary and others not. For example I did a ride day with Timmy Ferry and he said is work, and Seb Tortelli have different opinion.

 

There is a lot of mis information about weighting the outside peg.  Weighting the peg does NOTHING to change weight distribution to the tires.  It can't.  The position of you and the bike are the only things that can change that.  It is a center of mass issue.  OK...true the seat compresses...and if you weight the peg...you will take weight off the seat, and that will make you sit a bit higher..maybe 1/4"....utterly inconsequential.  The benefit to weighting the peg is that it makes it easier for you to quickly move relative to the bike.  So you can adjust lean quicker by pushing the bike down or standing it up.  The whole notion of lowering your CG by weighting the peg is nonsense from a physics perspective.  It is impossible.  What it does is create different load path to the wheels/tires.  But the loads themselves do not change if you are in the same position...by varying how you weight the outside peg.

 

In flat corners, weighting the peg is important to allow you to react and change bike lean under you.  Weighting the peg goes with overleaning the bike...and sitting on the side/edge of the seat.  It can help you get the tire over on edge better.  For rutted or bermed corners where you stay on top of the seat more...dont bother.  In that case, you are not needing to get on the edge of the tire.

 

If you watch MCs vid..he talks more about weighting the inside peg (entering corners standing...and taking rough corners standing).  I think most riders would benefit a lot more from learning to lean aggessively and surf the bike (weight the inside peg and drive the bike down with the outside knee) while standing...than from worrying about weighting the outside peg while sitting at turn exit.

Edited by Blutarsky

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There is a lot of mis information about weighting the outside peg. Weighting the peg does NOTHING to change weight distribution to the tires. It can't. The position of you and the bike are the only things that can change that. It is a center of mass issue. OK...true the seat compresses...and if you weight the peg...you will take weight off the seat, and that will make you sit a bit higher..maybe 1/4"....utterly inconsequential. The benefit to weighting the peg is that it makes it easier for you to quickly move relative to the bike. So you can adjust lean quicker by pushing the bike down or standing it up. The whole notion of lowering your CG by weighting the peg is nonsense from a physics perspective. It is impossible. What it does is create different load path to the wheels/tires. But the loads themselves do not change if you are in the same position...by varying how you weight the outside peg.

In flat corners, weighting the peg is important to allow you to react and change bike lean under you. Weighting the peg goes with overleaning the bike...and sitting on the side/edge of the seat. It can help you get the tire over on edge better. For rutted or bermed corners where you stay on top of the seat more...dont bother. In that case, you are not needing to get on the edge of the tire.

If you watch MCs vid..he talks more about weighting the inside peg (entering corners standing...and taking rough corners standing). I think most riders would benefit a lot more from learning to lean aggessively and surf the bike (weight the inside peg and drive the bike down with the outside knee) while standing...than from worrying about weighting the outside peg while sitting at turn exit.

you are not exactly right but do make great points. Outside peg weighting is critical on flat and off camber corners. If you don't while driving hard you'll simply wash out. Pushing down plants the bike and settles the suspension in those situations.

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what i have noticed in slippery conditions it helps alot keeping the trail you began doing in corners. including sand. lean in the bike with most weight on the seat, rear slips out and your exagurating the slide  because you put weight in the same angle.
push down on outer peg counters the sliding/falling motion.

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The most basic function of weighting the outside peg is to connect you to your bike. Generally when someone is focusing on outside peg weight, it's a sit down - inside foot out type of corner. You can talk about outside peg weight for standing and a bunch of other situations, but you're getting into scenarios where your inputs into the pegs are much more complicated then the basic 'weighting the outside peg'.

 

So what does being better connected to the bike get you? precision and feedback. You're eliminating the chatter that is allowed when you don't have a good connection with the bike. Sitting on the seat isn't enough, the bike has too much freedom to do unexpected things under you. Stabilize the bike and you gain control.

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The most basic function of weighting the outside peg is to connect you to your bike. Generally when someone is focusing on outside peg weight, it's a sit down - inside foot out type of corner. You can talk about outside peg weight for standing and a bunch of other situations, but you're getting into scenarios where your inputs into the pegs are much more complicated then the basic 'weighting the outside peg'.

 

So what does being better connected to the bike get you? precision and feedback. You're eliminating the chatter that is allowed when you don't have a good connection with the bike. Sitting on the seat isn't enough, the bike has too much freedom to do unexpected things under you. Stabilize the bike and you gain control.

 

I can buy this....but I think you have it backwards, in a way. 

 

Weighting the peg creates a SOFTER connection between you and the bike, not a firmer one.  More weight through your outside leg and arms, and a greater potential for relative motion between you and the bike.  In other words, added suspension.  This is a lot like standing to maintain grip in acceleration bumps.  If you sit...the bike can not absorb enough and you lose drive as the rear tire loads to much, then rebounds and loses contact.    But if you stand....you maintain better contact because your legs add suspension.  Weighting the peg adds suspension by taking weight off the seat...which is totally consistent with your comment about eliminating chatter and chop.  This is the best explanation I have heard as to how weighting the outside peg can actually benefit.  The "lowering your center of gravity" comments are 100% and irritatingly wrong. 

 

If you think about this carefully....you can theorize that having a taller but SOFTER seat will increase the benefit of weighting the outside peg.

Edited by Blutarsky
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you are not exactly right but do make great points. Outside peg weighting is critical on flat and off camber corners. If you don't while driving hard you'll simply wash out. Pushing down plants the bike and settles the suspension in those situations.

 

That would mean that if I sit on a chair, and push down on my legs with my hands, it makes the total weight the chair exerts on the ground greater?  You are saying what is commonly believed, but is simply not possible.  Only the position of you and bike change the loads the suspension (and tires, etc) sees. 

 

Two cases.  Rider holds the exact same position.  The bike lean and position is the same.  Assume the seat is very firm.

#1 - Sit on the seat...outside foot with minimal weight on the peg

#2 - Put 30# of weight on the outside peg..which takes weight off the seat. 

 

What you are saying is that the suspension will be loaded differently in these two cases, which is impossible.  It can not be if the position is the same.

 

Now, if the seat is very soft, when you weight the peg...your position will change. You will rise up as the seat springs back under you.  This will raise your CG slightly, which is detrimental.  If the seat is firm, however, and your positions between case 1 and 2 are essentially the same, then the suspension loading must be the same.  Sorry, physics.  Weighting the peg vs sitting on the seat only changes the way the loads GETS TO the suspension mounts.  The loads at the suspension mounts can not change. 

Edited by Blutarsky

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Is that necessary in every type of corners.? Or only off cambers? Because some people say is necessary and others not. For example I did a ride day with Timmy Ferry and he said is work, and Seb Tortelli have different opinion.

Most of the time the outside peg should be weighted especially when sliding though a turn with the inside foot out for the corner.  It’s not important to weight either peg when cornering through a berm (rutted corner) because the berm will hold the tires from sliding out.  About the only time it’s beneficial to weight the inside peg is while standing through a slippery corner.  This gets the center of gravity even lower but you better be sure you’re not going to have to put that inside foot out for the corner. 

 

The outside peg or both pegs should be weighted almost every time as you start exiting a corner. The reason is to keep your head forward so you are over the force of acceleration, not behind it.

 

Many of the techniques of motocross have exceptions. Example, about the above mentioned would be if the soil is soft. In this case you would want to keep your weight back in order to lighten the front end.

 

Improve your speed and control by learning all the proper Body Positions and Movements here. Join my TT Blog here. 

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Most of the time the outside peg should be weighted especially when sliding though a turn with the inside foot out for the corner. It’s not important to weight either peg when cornering through a berm (rutted corner) because the berm will hold the tires from sliding out. About the only time it’s beneficial to weight the inside peg is while standing through a slippery corner. This gets the center of gravity even lower but you better be sure you’re not going to have to put that inside foot out for the corner.

The outside peg or both pegs should be weighted almost every time as you start exiting a corner. The reason is to keep your head forward so you are over the force of acceleration, not behind it.

Many of the techniques of motocross have exceptions. Example, about the above mentioned would be if the soil is soft. In this case you would want to keep your weight back in order to lighten the front end.

Improve your speed and control by learning all the proper Body Positions and Movements here. Join my TT Blog here.

thanks Sr.

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