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New guy took his pig swimming... what now?

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Got my son an xr70 a while back, and when he got faster on it than I am on my bicycle I picked up an xr600 ('96).  Bike was in great shape until this afternoon.  We took our first major outing to Cape Fear MX and ATV in Elizabethtown.  Great place, but a little too sandy for a beginner.  Anyway, after the 300th time of jumping off my bike, picking my son up from a sandy corner and setting him off again, he got away.  Off I went to find him and took a wrong turn...

 

I got the bike out after a little grunting and heaving.  Drained about a cup of gas from the carb, pulled the side cover, removed the air filter, and squeezed some water out of it.  Put everything back together, pulled the compression release and kicked about 30 times to get water out of the exhaust.  Saw the property owner on a trip to get tools and he towed me back to my truck.  Halfway there I got the bright idea to shift to third and try a coast start.  Bike sputtered a few times and acted like it was going to run.  I got excited and tried again, which is when the rope snapped and kapowed me in the chest.

 

Question is, now what?  Pull the air filter and, clean it good, give a shot of carb cleaner and kick my brains out?  Break down the engine and put in new rings?  If it were your bike, what would you do?

Thanks!

Brian

 

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You shouldn't really have a big problem on your hands. I'd change the oil with a new filter, start 'her up for about 90 seconds, turn it off and change the oil and filter again. Take a look at the oil after an hour of riding and if it looks like it should carry on.

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Change the oil NOW. Don't let it set with water in the engine, the parts inside will rust very quickly and water mixed with used oil creates acidic conditions.

It will take several short oil change intervals to get most of the water out, then some long riding to get the engine up to temp and finish the job.

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hmm, hard to say that te engine got water in there.

 

Open the side covers and/or oil pan and inspect for water Depends what you find, it maybe nothing or really something major.

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I dumped a DRZ400E like that once and it was submerged for a good 15 minutes before we could get it out.  The mud and silt in the motor crushed the Scotts stainless steel oil filter.  Took about 6 oil changes to get it cleared out.  Since then, if I can't see the bottom of the water crossing, I'll let someone else lead the way.  

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Changed out the oil and filter tonight, started right up.  I let it run for about 5 minutes and changed everything again.  Both times that I drained the oil it was milky (not as bad the second time.  Got fresh oil in it and another filter, started it and let it idle for another 5 minutes.  Oil looks better now.  I ordered a new air filter for it (found a hole in the old one).  As soon as it gets here I'll take longer ride and change it out again.  Thanks for the help!

 

Brian

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Changed out the oil and filter tonight, started right up.  I let it run for about 5 minutes and changed everything again.  Both times that I drained the oil it was milky (not as bad the second time.  Got fresh oil in it and another filter, started it and let it idle for another 5 minutes.  Oil looks better now.  I ordered a new air filter for it (found a hole in the old one).  As soon as it gets here I'll take longer ride and change it out again.  Thanks for the help!

 

Brian

this is good news man, you may have gotten really lucky on this one. 

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Sounds like I'm too late for advice, but I drowned my XR650L this spring. If you do it right, you only have to change the oil once. But, you have to get ALL of the contaminated oil out of the bike. The only way to do that is to take the tank off the bike, drain as much oil as you can the conventional way, then, turn the bike upside down, and drain the rest of the oil out of the fill tube on top of the frame. 

 

Then, when you put fresh oil in, get your bike up to over 200° to boil all the residual water out of the engine. 

 

It sounds like you've got it under control. Smart move turning it over with the decomp pulled. You don't want any water in the cylinder when you try to start it. 

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Thanks again for the help everyone.  I was pretty sure it was water logged because of the way that I had to wrestle it out of the mud hole.  Picking up the front would sink the back end, and when I picked up the back it would sink the front.  I hit the engine kill as soon as I realized I was sinking, but all the rocking back and forth sloshed a fair amount of water into it.  Probably going to take a few more oil changes to get everything right, but that just gives me an excuse to ride more, "Honey, I have to ride the bike, the oil is contaminated and this will make it better, unless you want me to just buy a new bike..."  

 

I love those arguments :)

 

Brian

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When getting a bike unstuck, sometimes pulling one wheel sideways onto the bank can help break the suction of the mud.

In cases where there's a lot of water in the engine, it might be faster an cheaper to pout diesel / kerosene through the engine. Don't actually start the engine, just pour it through to dislodge any water. You can even catch it again, let the water settle out, pour it through a coffee filter to remove any grit, and the pour it through the engine again. Of course that will also wash out most of the lubricating engine oil, so be sure to get everything covered with engine oil before starting.

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SanMarcos004.jpg

 

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Six oil changes to clean this one.

Edited by tiemann1
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I played U boat commander once..... we were riding a fast moving creek that was not very deep but running fast. All was well until I got on some flat stone creek bed that was slippery as hell.The current pushed me backwards then sideways, once the bike slid sideways the water caught it and flipped me off. The bike on its side made a nice geyser of water from the end of the handlebars under water. I got it fished out and pushed it back to the truck. I dumped the gas and oil on the spot, pull the plug and valve adjustment caps and poured a quart of cheap oil in the top, crank over without a spark plug & repeat. I had a small crayfish in my air box.....

I made a mess in the garage once I got it home.

 

Nothing was damaged but its a lot of screwing around cleaning. Get some WD-40 and spray all your switches and cables to get the crap out.

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Had a buddy shot out across a river one time, before he would let me walk it out.

 

Tip: rivers always have a faster moving, deeper channel somewhere in it. You can usually tell by the ripples in the surface water.

 

He thought he was going to make it, then he hit that channel and sunk to over the bars. I was going to get wet anyway by walking it out first, but now I was helping push a scuttled U-bike across it. The funny part was when some people in a small boat passed by about five feet in front of him and quipped about how it was a little deep there.

 

For whatever reason, he was determined to make it to the other side. We pushed it over there, drained the water out of everything, decided not to start it, and pushed it back across. It was now dark. I rode the fifteen miles back to his place to get some oil and a filter and when I got back I was a little freaked out because he was neck deep in the river, splashing around trying to keep the mosquitos off of him. That river is chock-full of alligators. I was glad he was still there. For the most part, there isn't too much to worry about, be being neck deep and splashing around isn't a good idea.

 

This is a sign on that river where they've made a lake:

 

6711823329_a6f0a3832d_z.jpg

Edited by Onederer

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I swamped my 2007 XR650L back in January 2010.  I made this post:

http://www.thumpertalk.com/topic/782434-2007-xr650l-dynojet/

 

I bought that bike in 2009 with 700 miles on it (I had maybe 5k mi when this happened).  I was pretty upset and took evasive action.  Needless to say I got the bike perfect again (whole procedure is in the post).  Except for one detail.  One guy chimed in and said - you're lucky but you may start buring oil sometime down the road.  It took about a year and a couple thousand miles but inevitably he was right.  The cold water that got sucked into the engine thermally shocked the piston rings and they wore prematurely -and I started burning oil months later.  Finally I had the rings replaced and the bike has been perfect ever since.  I have almost 19k miles on it now...

 

You can monitor this with a good compression gauge.  Your XR600 should have a decompressor valve lever - warm up the bike first and turn it off, pull the spark plug, screw in the compression gauge hose and try to kick it over with the decompressor closed holding the throttle wide opened if possible (that is if it is not too difficult to kick it with the decompressor closed).  That bike should hold about 180psi or so (I think that is what it should be on my XR650L).  With the decompressor valve opened my XR650L, I recall, should be about 90psi.  Since XR650L is electric start and decompressor valve position closes with idle or greater engine RPM - it is near impossible to do a compression check (at least for me anyway) with the bike warm because in addition to all the steps you need to take getting the gauge in - you need to temporarily adjust your decompressor valve closed at the starter RPM which is less than engine RPM.

 

If you know your valves are correctly adjusted you can monitor compression degradation over time (every month or couple of months) and if you notice this is the case or you are burning oil - you may have compromised your rings.

 

The mechanic that replaced my rings said there is an easier way to check compression on an XR650L.  If anyone can explain this or has a link to a TT posting I would be greatful.  That's kind of off the subject here though so I won't elaborate any further on it.

 

Good luck -in the future try to keep the bike above water. ;)

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You'd need to either de-adjust the exhaust valve the decomp operates on or you'd need to push the bike in gear fast enough to simulate idling.

 

I've put my XRL about 4 feet under, just before nightfall, in november, in connecticut, just above freezing, and I was alone.

 

The headlight shining up through 4 feet of water makes one feel a bit lonesome, I can tell ya.
 

Had to ride it the 8 miles home without the airbox cover because all the water being pumped out of the crankcase would drown the engine.

 

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(Dive! Dive!)
Was out Sunday on the L, hitting some sandpits to test out my latest
mod, it was about 35 degrees and about 4 pm. It had been a
good ride, which was good because the last time I wore my aerostitch I
think I broke one or both feet. It was nice to know there wasn't any
bad juju lingering in the gore-tex.
I wandered through some adjoining woods, no trail but fairly open, and
found a small valley, about 15 feet deep, with a little stream running
through the bottom, where the valley was about 50' wide.
There were qwaaad tracks, so I could tell things were fairly firm and
rode in to try out the hill. Rode down, crossed the stream where the
tracks were, turned around, went to go back up the hill. Got bounced a
little in the stream and lost all my momentum, so I turned around and
re-crossed the stream about 2 feet down from the tracks.
Eased the front wheel in (the stream was about 6"-1' deep where I had
crossed previously) and the front end went down. And down. And down.
SONOFA<glub>! Needless to say, rule 1 is DON'T GET STUCK UNDER THE
BIKE, so I bailed and didn't ride it all the way in to see how deep it
was. Well, it was about 3-1/2 or 4 feet deep, I was standing there,
bike completely submerged and invisible, its 30-fricken-something
degrees, and its getting dark. The little oil-and-gas rainbows on the
stream were pretty to watch, though.
Muscled the bike out (much easier to lift in the water!), flipped it
over several times to get it out of the hole and onto the bank, got it
on the kickstand.
Side panel off the airbox- cut to that scene in risky business when
the door to the porsche is opened and all the water comes out. Ditto
for removing the air filter. Try cranking it- yep, its water-locked.
I got the air scoop off the left side of the tank, got the plug out,
cranked the water out. Waited 30 secs. Cranked out more water.
Repeated about 15 times until it seemed all the *excess* water was
pumped out of the crancase and the exhaust system. Got the plug back
in. Its getting dark. Turned the fuel on, drained the carb until
something that smelled like gas came out. Cranked it over and waited
for an encouraging sign. And cranked. And waited. Damn, I'm screwed.
Thought for a minute, and whanged myself upside the head- forgot the
plug cap. Dumbass!
Lots more cranking, it started to spit, then it started to run, and
the water was coming out the exhaust pipe like a hose, then like a
steam pipe. Got it turned around in the mud, got across the stream for
some runup, crossed again and got up the hill. Went back for the gear
and tools, by this time it was 5:30, dark, and below freezing (trusty
bank thermometers- at least some things don't change). On the way
home, my feet and my hands were the only things cold- nothing quite as
amazing as an aerostitch, but now I wonder even more- am I going to
have a little adventure everytime I wear it?
The rest of the stream was shallow, there must have been a little
sand-pocket right in this spot that just got scrubbed away. There was
even a little turbulence on the surface making it look like there were
some rocks just below the surface.

I changed the oil about 4 times until it didn't look like a mocha-cino, and fired a fair amount
of WD40 into the airbox (sans filter) while it was running to get rid
of all the white goo. Hopefully anthing else that got wet can wait
until the winter teardown-and-grease, and will tolerate a few more
rides between now and then.

Dave, U-650 commander.
 

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<< Dive! Dive!)
Was out Sunday on the L, hitting some sandpits to test out my latest
mod, it was about 35 degrees and about 4 pm. It had been a
good ride, which was good because the last time I wore my aerostitch I
think I broke one or both feet. It was nice to know there wasn't any
bad juju lingering in the gore-tex. >>
 

Great story..  :-)

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